Designers, Build your iPhone Apps with Corona

20 Aug 2009 - 5:46pm
5 years ago
16 replies
1335 reads
bambou
2009

If you feel technically challenged to build iPhone apps yourself, then you
need to know about this new tool.

While Apple¹s SDK is accessible to engineers, we designers have to leave the
honorable task of developing an iPhone application that we thought out and
carefully designed to technical savvy hands. But times are changing as the
guys at Ansca, Inc (www.anscamobile.com) just released an iPhone SDK that is
accessible to us! Ansca Corona makes it possible for us designers, web
developers and scripting engineers who aren¹t experienced in mobile
development to quickly and easily create native iPhone applications.

Corona decreases the volume and difficulty of learning and writing code for
iPhone applications, reducing development time and cost by up to 90 percent.
Today, several Ansca-powered applications created within a week by users of
Corona are already on the App Store.

Bamboudesign (http://www.bamboudesign.com), the San Francisco-based company
I run, is now developing iPhone apps exclusively with Corona.

Don¹t just build assets, build the full app and publish it in the App Store
yourself!

The SDK is free to download while in beta version.

Learn more about Corona and download the Corona SDK here while it¹s still
free (you need to register first):
http://developer.anscamobile.com/

Comments

21 Aug 2009 - 5:49am
Maurice
2009

You had me up until I came to the form.
Way too long and way too much *required information.
Too bad.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=44894

21 Aug 2009 - 9:22am
Anonymous

@Maurice re:

"You had me up until I came to the form.
Way too long and way too much *required information.
Too bad."

Really? So you'd be willing to learn a new language (Lua), API,
methodology etc., but if a form has a few too many fields for your
liking, you bail on the whole shebang?

Is this IxD elitism? Is it a privacy thing? Do you believe that the
extra 30 sec. it might take to fill out a form outweighs the benefits
of being able to develop iPhone apps w/out having to learn Obj-C?

I don't mean these questions to sound rude - I'm honestly curious. Do
you do this a lot w/ stuff you find on the web? In life in general?

I'm curious, because if there are a ton of users like you, whom when
presented w/ the keys to the kingdom as it were would nay-say it and
give up because a form had 5 too many fields in it, then I'm just...
wow. I don't know what to say. To me, that's like meeting someone for
the first time, and after a few minutes saying "Excuse me, I'm sorry,
but you just talk a little too much - I don't have time for people
like you. Goodbye." and walking away. It's like Moses and the serpent.
Look and live! Yet they would not look, because the form was too long.

I get the privacy thing, but there wasn't anything in there that sent
up any flags for me. It is pre-beta, and they're probably really
curious as to who is most interested in their SDK so they can lean
towards supporting their biggest user-base, so they'd really like you
to fill out a bunch of required fields. Small price to pay I say for a
free SDK that does what this does.

Am I totally off-base here? I'm just really, really shocked at a
response like that. Please - enlighten me!

Brandon E. B. Ward
brandonebward at gmail.com
UI • UX • Ix Design
Flex • Flash Development
Portfolio: http://www.uxd.me
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/brandonebward
VisualCV: http://www.visualcv.com/brandonebward

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
- Robert A. Heinlein

21 Aug 2009 - 10:06am
Joe Lanman
2007

It's a lot of information to put in for something a new user knows very
little about. New experiences generally need either a very low barrier to
entry, or recommendations from others in the industry/friends etc.

2009/8/21 Brandon E. B. Ward <brandonebward at gmail.com>

> @Maurice re:
>
> "You had me up until I came to the form.
> Way too long and way too much *required information.
> Too bad."
>
> Really? So you'd be willing to learn a new language (Lua), API, methodology
> etc., but if a form has a few too many fields for your liking, you bail on
> the whole shebang?
>
> Is this IxD elitism? Is it a privacy thing? Do you believe that the extra
> 30 sec. it might take to fill out a form outweighs the benefits of being
> able to develop iPhone apps w/out having to learn Obj-C?
>
> I don't mean these questions to sound rude - I'm honestly curious. Do you
> do this a lot w/ stuff you find on the web? In life in general?
>
> I'm curious, because if there are a ton of users like you, whom when
> presented w/ the keys to the kingdom as it were would nay-say it and give up
> because a form had 5 too many fields in it, then I'm just... wow. I don't
> know what to say. To me, that's like meeting someone for the first time, and
> after a few minutes saying "Excuse me, I'm sorry, but you just talk a little
> too much - I don't have time for people like you. Goodbye." and walking
> away. It's like Moses and the serpent. Look and live! Yet they would not
> look, because the form was too long.
>
> I get the privacy thing, but there wasn't anything in there that sent up
> any flags for me. It is pre-beta, and they're probably really curious as to
> who is most interested in their SDK so they can lean towards supporting
> their biggest user-base, so they'd really like you to fill out a bunch of
> required fields. Small price to pay I say for a free SDK that does what this
> does.
>
> Am I totally off-base here? I'm just really, really shocked at a response
> like that. Please - enlighten me!
>
> Brandon E. B. Ward
> brandonebward at gmail.com
> UI • UX • Ix Design
> Flex • Flash Development
> Portfolio: http://www.uxd.me
> LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/brandonebward
> VisualCV: http://www.visualcv.com/brandonebward
>
> A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher
> a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts,
> build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders,
> cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure,
> program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.
> Specialization is for insects.
> - Robert A. Heinlein
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--

http://formd.net

21 Aug 2009 - 10:52am
Hugh Griffith
2007

I'm guessing Maurice was looking more out of curiosity than someone who
genuinely wants to develop apps.

His point is still valid of course. Making the form less painful might
result in more participation. Who knows though, maybe they made it that way
deliberately to keep the sign ups manageable?

Hugh Griffith
User Interface Designer

On Fri, Aug 21, 2009 at 9:06 AM, Joe Lanman <joe at formd.net> wrote:

> It's a lot of information to put in for something a new user knows very
> little about. New experiences generally need either a very low barrier to
> entry, or recommendations from others in the industry/friends etc.
>
>
>
> 2009/8/21 Brandon E. B. Ward <brandonebward at gmail.com>
>
> > @Maurice re:
> >
> > "You had me up until I came to the form.
> > Way too long and way too much *required information.
> > Too bad."
> >
> > Really? So you'd be willing to learn a new language (Lua), API,
> methodology
> > etc., but if a form has a few too many fields for your liking, you bail
> on
> > the whole shebang?
> >
> > Is this IxD elitism? Is it a privacy thing? Do you believe that the extra
> > 30 sec. it might take to fill out a form outweighs the benefits of being
> > able to develop iPhone apps w/out having to learn Obj-C?
> >
> > I don't mean these questions to sound rude - I'm honestly curious. Do you
> > do this a lot w/ stuff you find on the web? In life in general?
> >
> > I'm curious, because if there are a ton of users like you, whom when
> > presented w/ the keys to the kingdom as it were would nay-say it and give
> up
> > because a form had 5 too many fields in it, then I'm just... wow. I don't
> > know what to say. To me, that's like meeting someone for the first time,
> and
> > after a few minutes saying "Excuse me, I'm sorry, but you just talk a
> little
> > too much - I don't have time for people like you. Goodbye." and walking
> > away. It's like Moses and the serpent. Look and live! Yet they would not
> > look, because the form was too long.
> >
> > I get the privacy thing, but there wasn't anything in there that sent up
> > any flags for me. It is pre-beta, and they're probably really curious as
> to
> > who is most interested in their SDK so they can lean towards supporting
> > their biggest user-base, so they'd really like you to fill out a bunch of
> > required fields. Small price to pay I say for a free SDK that does what
> this
> > does.
> >
> > Am I totally off-base here? I'm just really, really shocked at a response
> > like that. Please - enlighten me!
> >
> > Brandon E. B. Ward
> > brandonebward at gmail.com
> > UI • UX • Ix Design
> > Flex • Flash Development
> > Portfolio: http://www.uxd.me
> > LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/brandonebward
> > VisualCV: http://www.visualcv.com/brandonebward
> >
> > A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
> butcher
> > a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts,
> > build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders,
> > cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch
> manure,
> > program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.
> > Specialization is for insects.
> > - Robert A. Heinlein
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> > List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> >
>
>
>
> --
>
> http://formd.net
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

21 Aug 2009 - 11:20am
Anonymous

I am guessing it had to do with the fact that he didn't want to share
all the personal information which is why most people don't feel
comfortable filling out so many forms online as well. But then again,
I am guessing. I do love the fact that Brandon Ripped Maurice a new
one at 7 something in the morning...slow down on the starbucks bro.
Why would you care when someone responded with such a small response
in the first place. It is there opinion. They are most likely not
developers and didn't plan on doing any coding in the first place so
move along. Use it yourself and write up a good review based off of
your user experiences.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=44894

21 Aug 2009 - 11:51am
Anonymous

"...Brandon Ripped Maurice a new one at 7 something in the morning..."

One of my favorite quotes - "I love the power of the written language
to convey tone of voice." You know, because it's not very good?
Because you have to explicitly state sarcasm w/ emoticons and junk :-
P :-O. I sometimes forget to do so. Picture me eyes wide open, big
smile on my facing saying "Really? How come? That sounds crazy to me -
please explain..." with patent sincerity, frivolity and good-will.

I intend no disrespect, no harm, no ill-will, no ripping. I'm just
honestly and eagerly curious. Maurice's response shocked me, partly
because I'm currently so twitterpated with Corona. Tomorrow will
probably be less so. I can go from Fanboy to hater in a heartbeat.
Right now I'm Fanboy. I get really excited about new, interesting
things. I like it when others do too. So I'm genuinely curious as to
what reasons one would have for rejecting so quickly something (that
to me is) awesome for something (that to me is) trivial. See? I have
my opinions, but I love to hear why others have theirs. That's all I
meant.

Also - I wrote it at 10:20 PM my time - no caffeine here. Now it's
almost 1 AM - so maybe it's the opposite.

Brandon E. B. Ward
brandonebward at gmail.com
UI • UX • Ix Design
Flex • Flash Development
Portfolio: http://www.uxd.me
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/brandonebward
VisualCV: http://www.visualcv.com/brandonebward

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
- Robert A. Heinlein

21 Aug 2009 - 12:54pm
jaketrimble
2008

"Because you have to explicitly state sarcasm w/ emoticons and junk
:- P :-O."

There is a great need for sarcasm font :)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=44894

21 Aug 2009 - 1:19pm
Andrei Herasimchuk
2004

On Aug 21, 2009, at 7:22 AM, Brandon E. B. Ward wrote:

> Really? So you'd be willing to learn a new language (Lua), API,
> methodology etc., but if a form has a few too many fields for your
> liking, you bail on the whole shebang?

I'll answer!

Um... Yes.

8^)

I too bailed on the form. Because I think the point was that the
*required* information was too much to ask for when one has no idea if
the Dev kit is actually worth it since it's sight unseen. I'd actually
like to check it out, but I won't given the sign up process.

--
Andrei Herasimchuk

Chief Design Officer, Involution Studios
innovating the digital world

e. andrei at involutionstudios.com
c. +1 408 306 6422

21 Aug 2009 - 1:40pm
Jack L. Moffett
2005

On Aug 21, 2009, at 2:19 PM, Andrei Herasimchuk wrote:

> I too bailed on the form. Because I think the point was that the
> *required* information was too much to ask for when one has no idea
> if the Dev kit is actually worth it since it's sight unseen. I'd
> actually like to check it out, but I won't given the sign up process.

Ha! But you wanted us to pay $30 to try out Fever!

Best,
Jack

Jack L. Moffett
Senior Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.459.0310 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

Some men see things as they are and say "why?"
I dream of things that never were and say "why not?"

- George Bernard
Shaw

21 Aug 2009 - 1:59pm
Andrei Herasimchuk
2004

On Aug 21, 2009, at 11:40 AM, Jack Moffett wrote:

> Ha! But you wanted us to pay $30 to try out Fever!

Which had an extensive demo video to show you the full product before
you bought it.

I'd a demo video, screenshots, anything for Corona. Again... I'm
actually quite interested in it, but I won't drop all the personal
information they want in that sign up form without seeing *something*
beforehand.

--
Andrei Herasimchuk

Chief Design Officer, Involution Studios
innovating the digital world

e. andrei at involutionstudios.com
c. +1 408 306 6422

21 Aug 2009 - 2:05pm
Jack L. Moffett
2005

On Aug 21, 2009, at 2:59 PM, Andrei Herasimchuk wrote:

> Which had an extensive demo video to show you the full product
> before you bought it.

Ah, right. Good point.
Still, I couldn't resist poking fun. ;-)

Best,
Jack

Jack L. Moffett
Senior Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.459.0310 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

You could design a process to catch
everything, but then you're overprocessing.
You kill creativity. You kill productivity.
By definition, a culture like ours that
drives innovation is managed chaos.

-Alex Lee
President, OXO International

21 Aug 2009 - 3:20pm
Brian Mila
2009

You know, you could always enter fake information if you were *really*
that interested in it. I know Joe Blow at 123 Fake St. gets a ton of
spam because of me ;)

Brian

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=44894

21 Aug 2009 - 4:06pm
Todd Warfel
2003

On Aug 21, 2009, at 10:22 AM, Brandon E. B. Ward wrote:

> Am I totally off-base here? I'm just really, really shocked at a
> response like that. Please - enlighten me!

It's called perception. And in fact, I see this quite often. That
initial form is the first contact a potential customer will have with
the company and speaks to what it's going to be like to work with
their product.

Think of it this way: if the initial form is this complicated,
complex, and inefficient, then what is the platform like? Most likely,
it's complex, complicated, and not a pleasure to use either.

Now, perhaps the software is easier to use than an API, but if that
initial point of contact, the form, doesn't clearly show that, then
they've lost the sale before the customer even walks in the door.

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
Principal Design Researcher
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
Twitter: zakiwarfel
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

22 Aug 2009 - 6:04pm
cfmdesigns
2004

On Aug 21, 2009, at 7:22 AM, Brandon E. B. Ward wrote:

> @Maurice re:
>
> "You had me up until I came to the form.
> Way too long and way too much *required information.
> Too bad."
>
> Really? So you'd be willing to learn a new language (Lua), API,
> methodology etc., but if a form has a few too many fields for your
> liking, you bail on the whole shebang?

On the surface, yes this seems odd. But there are two mindsets
involved here: there's the "I want to explore, find something new"
mindset which will rise to the challenge of the new language, etc.,
and there's the "what's the hook, what will it cost me" mindset which
balks at the upfront overhead and the concerns about privacy and such.

The latter is a "stopper" mindset, and those will slam on the brakes
with more power than the "explore" one will press on the gas.

> I'm curious, because if there are a ton of users like you, whom when
> presented w/ the keys to the kingdom as it were would nay-say it and
> give up because a form had 5 too many fields in it, then I'm just...
> wow. I don't know what to say. To me, that's like meeting someone
> for the first time, and after a few minutes saying "Excuse me, I'm
> sorry, but you just talk a little too much - I don't have time for
> people like you. Goodbye." and walking away. It's like Moses and the
> serpent. Look and live! Yet they would not look, because the form
> was too long.

"Completing the sale" has always been one of the big challenges. The
more reasons or opportunities you give people to bow out, the more
will. If you're getting feedback that a sign-up form is onerous,
don't get defensive (because that will prove to people that they were
*right* to opt-out). Look at why people are saying such stuff and how
to make it better.

-- Jim

24 Aug 2009 - 5:47am
Anonymous

Thanks for everyone's replies. You've helped me to see things from
some different perspectives which weren't clear to me before. I'm
definitely going to make sure any intro form I have is as absolutely
simple and requires as little info as possible!

Thanks,

Brandon E. B. Ward
brandonebward at gmail.com
UI • UX • Ix Design
Flex • Flash Development
Portfolio: http://www.uxd.me
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/brandonebward
VisualCV: http://www.visualcv.com/brandonebward

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
- Robert A. Heinlein

24 Aug 2009 - 6:42am
Andy Edmonds
2004

Back to the iphone topic, there are lots of tools for using HTML/JS to build
iphone apps.

Phonegap, http://www.phonegap.com, is open source and has limited support
for native tab bars. I built my first iphone app with this (iblipper.com).

TitaniumApp.com is a hybrid open source SAAS play with rich support for
native controls.

Objective-C is really no longer the only way to do iphone dev.

--AndyEd, creator of the expressive typography rapid serial visual
presentation app, http://www.iblipper.com

On Thu, Aug 20, 2009 at 6:46 PM, Marine Leroux <marine at bamboudesign.com>wrote:

> If you feel technically challenged to build iPhone apps yourself, then you
> need to know about this new tool.
>
> ...
> Corona decreases the volume and difficulty of learning and writing code for
> iPhone applications, reducing development time and cost by up to 90
> percent.
> Today, several Ansca-powered applications created within a week by users of
> Corona are already on the App Store.
>
>

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