Netbooks lead the way on how we'll be using our mobile phones in the near future

26 Aug 2009 - 1:46pm
4 years ago
2 replies
473 reads
Andrei Herasimchuk
2004

On Aug 26, 2009, at 11:30 AM, dave malouf wrote:

> Have people seen this company called Modu?
> they have an interesting take on all this:
> http://modumobile.com/

They've got an interesting story for sure. I wonder how successful
they'll be against bigger players like Apple though.

I've brought up the idea a few times with people I know over at Apple
about how what I want is my iPhone to slide or dock into the spot
where the current trackpad is, and use the iPhone as a touch based
input on my laptop to replace the trackpad. Basically make my iPhone
an integral part of my laptop when I'm at my desk, where the iPhone
brings me a touch I/O to my computer instead of having to make the
entire computer screen a touch-based model.

You can also do more interesting things like what was on display at
TED with the blocks mini-computers, only here the laptop and the
iPhone talk to each other to create computer-to-computer interactions
that make sense in a working environment, using both screens for
unique things not possible currently. Then when I head home, I undock
the iPhone and have all my data and personal stuff on it already and
can use it as I do today. By docking the iPhone to your laptop in this
fashion, you get nice benefits like it can auto-sync and get
recharged. It can also store all my application keys and prefs so when
I change laptops, I don't have to reinstall and reconfigure my tools
like the Creative Suite or Mail or iTunes.

Whenever I mention this sort of idea, I get the typical sly wink and
smile from Apple people. Even my good friends there have become part
of the cult of secrecy. Frustration!

Anyway, once Apple and other computer manufacturer's do this kind of
stuff, which I imagine is probably within the next five years, I think
it might put some of these other companies out of business. Guess
we'll see.

--
Andrei Herasimchuk

Chief Design Officer, Involution Studios
innovating the digital world

e. andrei at involutionstudios.com
c. +1 408 306 6422

Comments

26 Aug 2009 - 2:09pm
Nasir Barday
2006

This is all sounds akin to Mark Weiser's vision for tabs, pads, and boards:
(if you're in a hurry, do a Ctrl+F for "Ubiquitous computers will also come
in different sizes"):
http://www.ubiq.com/hypertext/weiser/SciAmDraft3.html

I'm not sold on the idea of a mobile as a central, dockable device-- at the
end of the day, you're still interacting with (or carrying) multiple devices
in your pocket, right? What are we winning here-- savings on buying the
processor and memory over and over? I wonder if we could accomplish the same
UbiComp greatness by making data flow effortless. You could say docking is a
crude, physical way to get "easy data flow," but I think the interactions in
this scheme would be richer if the devices remain as separate entities, not
simply multiple views of the same device.

- N

26 Aug 2009 - 2:13pm
Nasir Barday
2006

AH! Just realized Andrei is describing exactly that-- that the mobile device
becomes an extension of the laptop, not its brain, as the Modu concept
proposes. So I could, say, minimize a document to my mobile, carry it over
to a meeting room, and continue working on it on the room's large multitouch
computer.

- N

On Wed, Aug 26, 2009 at 3:09 PM, Nasir Barday
<nbarday+ixda at gmail.com<nbarday%2Bixda at gmail.com>
> wrote:

> This is all sounds akin to Mark Weiser's vision for tabs, pads, and boards:
> (if you're in a hurry, do a Ctrl+F for "Ubiquitous computers will also come
> in different sizes"):
> http://www.ubiq.com/hypertext/weiser/SciAmDraft3.html
>
> I'm not sold on the idea of a mobile as a central, dockable device-- at the
> end of the day, you're still interacting with (or carrying) multiple devices
> in your pocket, right? What are we winning here-- savings on buying the
> processor and memory over and over? I wonder if we could accomplish the same
> UbiComp greatness by making data flow effortless. You could say docking is a
> crude, physical way to get "easy data flow," but I think the interactions in
> this scheme would be richer if the devices remain as separate entities, not
> simply multiple views of the same device.
>
> - N
>

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