iPhone turnover (was We don't make consumer products, hence no need for a User Centered Design development process.)

31 Aug 2009 - 3:09pm
4 years ago
1 reply
1104 reads
cfmdesigns
2004

On Aug 29, 2009, at 8:35 PM, Ali Naqvi <Ali at amroha.dk> wrote:

> With regards to iPhone I would say that many users are now complaining
> about the phone.

Well, 1/10 of 1% are complaining, and 90% of those due to AppStore
approvals rather than the phone. Is thar "many"? Maybe "many who I
talk to to see if they want to complain".

Your closeness to the interviewed set gives an illusion of numbers, I
think. The vast majority of iPhone users have little they complain
about.

> What did the Iphone have apart from its touchscreen and "finger
> moving" interaction?

That and software that was fully integrated are all it needed.

I test software that interacts with a myriad of phones and other
devices. Many of these work perfectly okay. Which is to say none of
them work beyond adequately. They do the job, but nothing — nothing!
— is impressive enough to brag about, or even consider enjoyable to
work with.

That is the only feature that the iPhone needed: 9 times out of 10,
you will say "Yes, that worked just like it should.". No other phone's
non-phone tools come remotely close to that. You use them because they
are there, not because they are good.

> If it fell to the ground it was done over with. My colleague
> accidentally
> dropped it to the ground and the phone was "dead".

That's why I consider my TV to be substandard, because it breaks if I
drop it. And I definitely have no ceramic coffee mugs.

If a droppable phone is the important feature, buy one suited for
that. (Me, I got a shock resistant iPhone app to help with the issue.
People who don't are probably foolish.)

> Tons of my friends went back to Nokia or other models after trying
> Iphone for 6 months.

The only person I know who did that was someone for whom the prime
feature was being able to muck with the OS code, so he went to to an
Android.

I tend to suspect "tons" is measured in pounds here, and it was either
people with major misconceptions going in or those predisposed to find
fault and never expected to hang onto the iPhone.

Are there any stats out there for actual turnover if actual users?

-- Jim
Via my iPhone

Comments

31 Aug 2009 - 3:44pm
Todd Warfel
2003

On Aug 29, 2009, at 8:35 PM, Ali Naqvi <Ali at amroha.dk> wrote:

> With regards to iPhone I would say that many users are now complaining
> about the phone.

I'm calling BS here. I'd like to see some real numbers on this rather
than these claims of "many users are complaining" and "tons of my
friends went back to Nokia".

> What did the Iphone have apart from its touchscreen and "finger
> moving" interaction?

Pleasure. Seriously, it's the first phone that's actually a pleasure
to use. Apple took the pain out of mobile phone use (and then
introduced a few pains of their own).

I remember walking through Home Depot the first week I had my iPhone
and a 20 something was trying to explain YouTube to a 60 something. I
just pulled up YouTube on my iPhone and handed it to him. You should
have seen that conversation evolve.

And the App store. Oh, sure you can claim that Nokia has an app store,
but really, what kind of penetration does that have? Insignificant to
almost non-existent. Seriously, if it's been out for several years and
people still don't know about it outside of the Netherlands is it
really a success?

> If it fell to the ground it was done over with. My colleague
> accidentally dropped it to the ground and the phone was "dead".

I've seen several iPhones that have been dropped, screens shattered,
and guess what... the touchscreen still works. Your friend must have
run it over with a tractor. I've dropped mine dozens of times and it
still works. Of course I didn't toss it off a 10 story building, but...

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
Principal Design Researcher
Messagefirst | Designing Information. Beautifully.
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Email: todd at messagefirst.com
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In practice, they are not.

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