Mass transit.

17 Jan 2005 - 7:51am
9 years ago
5 replies
309 reads
Marcin Wichary
2004

I've always been interested in how to make mass transit (air
transport, railways, subways, buses and trams, etc.) more friendly --
not sure if it can be classified as IxD or usability, but information
visualization and industrial design are definitely playing a major role
here.

Everyone knows the ubiquitous London Underground Tube map example,
which I've read a lot about, I also have some books about other
underground maps and signage designs for airports, etc., but it's far
too little to keep me satisfied. Is anyone here also interested in that
and could give me some literature/website pointers? I'd be very
grateful.

One of the nice examples of "humane approach" for me was in London,
where the "This is an emergency stairway" plaque on some of the
stations is accompanied by a delightful addition in smaller print:
"This stairway has 180 steps" (or something to that extent).

Marcin Wichary
e:\> mwichary at usability.pl
w:\> www.aci.com.pl/mwichary >> Attached
w:\> www.aci.com.pl/mwichary/gui >> Graphical User Interface gallery
w:\> www.10yearsofbeingboring.com >> 10 years of Being Boring
w:\> www.usability.pl >> Usability.pl

Comments

17 Jan 2005 - 8:26am
Alain D. M. G. ...
2003

Hello!

Prototypes of PRT (Personal Rapid Transit) systems and APM (Automated
People Mover) systems and also those APM systems which are actually
running, have the greatest concentration of interactive user devices
(in the form of touch screens or orther) among all mass transit systems
since one of their goals or "raison d'etre" is to eliminate nearly all
the usual human ticket punchers and drivers and operators. From what I
have seen of the destination selecting touchscreens in prototype PRT
systems, they need a lot of help from the HCI/IxD/usability/UE
community!

Take a look at professor Jerry Schneider's Innovative Transportation
Technologies site to get an idea of the systems where those interfaces
wil pop up or have already popped up. Yes, the site is a bit odd but
it is extremely comprehensive.

http://faculty.washington.edu/~jbs/itrans/

Alain Vaillancourt

--- Marcin Wichary <mwichary at aci.com.pl> a écrit :
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> I've always been interested in how to make mass transit (air
> transport, railways, subways, buses and trams, etc.) more friendly --
>
> not sure if it can be classified as IxD or usability, but information
>
> visualization and industrial design are definitely playing a major
> role
> here.
>
> Everyone knows the ubiquitous London Underground Tube map example,
> which I've read a lot about, I also have some books about other
> underground maps and signage designs for airports, etc., but it's far
>
> too little to keep me satisfied. Is anyone here also interested in
> that
> and could give me some literature/website pointers? I'd be very
> grateful.
>
> One of the nice examples of "humane approach" for me was in London,
> where the "This is an emergency stairway" plaque on some of the
> stations is accompanied by a delightful addition in smaller print:
> "This stairway has 180 steps" (or something to that extent).
>
>
> Marcin Wichary
> e:\> mwichary at usability.pl
> w:\> www.aci.com.pl/mwichary >> Attached
> w:\> www.aci.com.pl/mwichary/gui >> Graphical User Interface gallery
> w:\> www.10yearsofbeingboring.com >> 10 years of Being Boring
> w:\> www.usability.pl >> Usability.pl
>
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__________________________________________________________
Lèche-vitrine ou lèche-écran ?
magasinage.yahoo.ca

17 Jan 2005 - 5:41pm
Dan Zlotnikov
2004

Wikipedia has a very good collection of links to projects -- both
planned and already operational.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_transit (esp. under "Emerging
transportation technologies")

I wonder who would actually bother to read the small print about the
number of steps in an emergency, though...

Dan

--
WatCHI
http://www.acm.org/chapters/watchi

17 Jan 2005 - 7:25pm
John Vaughan - ...
2004

Dan said:
> I wonder who would actually bother to read the small print about the
> number of steps in an emergency, though...

Probably very few, but then, very few of us are "cool headed" in times of crisis.

A better bet is that someone waiting for a train (or an elevator), might take a look at the emergency map or instructions out of boredom....and if the info registers, then it may be remembered when needed.

John

currently consulting at

User eXperience Practice
Bunge Global Markets
White Plains, NY

18 Jan 2005 - 2:50am
Marcin Wichary
2004

>> I wonder who would actually bother to read the small print about the
>> number of steps in an emergency, though...
>
> Probably very few, but then, very few of us are "cool headed" in times
> of crisis.

Hmmmm. I always assumed that the small print (not really that small,
mind you) is just for all those people who would otherwise thought
"it's gonna be faster than the elevator" and then die of exhaustion
mid-journey. :)

Marcin Wichary
e:\> mwichary at usability.pl
w:\> www.aci.com.pl/mwichary >> Attached
w:\> www.aci.com.pl/mwichary/gui >> Graphical User Interface gallery
w:\> www.10yearsofbeingboring.com >> 10 years of Being Boring
w:\> www.usability.pl >> Usability.pl

18 Jan 2005 - 10:00am
Songtao Liu
2005

>"This is an emergency stairway" plaque on some of the
>stations is accompanied by a delightful addition in smaller print:
>"This stairway has 180 steps" (or something to that extent).

I believe some people will appreciate these smaller prints, as they
give them a hint and let estimate how much effort you will be taking.

Songtao

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