Being a designer in a small country (was 'The non-Americans')

18 Jan 2005 - 4:02am
9 years ago
10 replies
783 reads
Welie, Martijn van
2005

After seeing the discussion in the topic of 'non-americans' in this list, I
thought I'd share some thoughts on how it is like being a designer in a
'small-country'...(which the Americans may freely interpret as 'everything
outside of the states'...:-).

I live in the Netherlands, a small country between the UK and Germany with
16 million inhabitants, and I work for an international (mostly
Finland-based though) web design agency. We work for large local clients and
some of those are also internationally present but we usually work for the
'Dutch branch'. Times are hard for us economically speaking although we
managed to survive so far and things are improving. We were even profitable
last year!

Although this is not based on thorough research let me share some thoughts
on issues I have to face every day which have an impact on my work as an
interaction designer, .....and then the others may shoot ;-) I am curious to
see how many of you face the same issues.

- Most of our projects are relatively small. The target audience in the
Netherlands is small since it is a small country. So Return on Investment
calculations and local budgets lead to fairly low budgets for projects. For
example, it is common to do an entire site redesign for a medium sized site
for 30.000 EURO (about $50.000 at the current rates). Which an average
hourly price of 800-1000 EURO/hour that gives us roughly 30 days for the
entire project. That translates to roughly 5-7 days for the interaction
design (that would be me) and perhaps 5 for the graphical design. That is
not much time for an entire site redesign!!! Efficiency is a major concern
because otherwise we loose money on every project. Naturally we also have
some larger projects but even then the pressure is always on. Basically, we
should be happy to be able to work for them, rather than they should be
happy they can work with us....

- Large companies don't do business with small (<15 persons) design agencies
or freelancers. We often become the 'intermediate' agency that coordinates
the entire job for a client and we use freelancers to help us out. Sometimes
we are even forced to give work a client-preferred company that we could
have done ourselves and now have to work with.

- Although the Netherlands is historically known for its achievements in
'Design', there are probably 15,9 million people in the Netherlands who
still have no clue about design!!! Our clients are usually among them. Very
few of our clients know what it takes to do a web design project which leads
to a continuous state of chaos and mismatches in expectations. Only when you
do more projects for a client, the process gets better because they have
learned how it works. For example, one client I worked for didn't want to
pay much for doing wireframes because they never did that and didn't see why
that was important (typical manager attitude) although I went through great
lengths to explain it. When I did it anyway (typical Dutch attitude?), the
client got enthusiastic and made it a rule that every project should be
wireframed entirely. The next project I did for them, I got 25 days for
doing the wireframes!!!! That was heaven....

- One of the characteristics of Dutch people is that they always have an
opinion and they are not shy in shouting it around. I am not sure whether
this is a positive of negative characteristic but I can notice that my
Finnish collegues (that is only about 1500 Km away) are definately
different!! What this leads to is that it is really important to avoid
'design by community' type of processes. Clients are always groups of people
and they often avoid taking decisions until everyone's opinion has been
heared. In Dutch we say: 'until everyone has peed over it' (but then in
Dutch of course...) A similar thing happens inside our project team although
that is controllable....often opinions are considered more important than
research on works best, especially if it's the boss's opinion.

I could probably come up with more issues but this message is getting long
enough already....
So what issues do other 'non-Americans' face? In Slovenia, Sweden, Austria
etc...?

Best regards,

Martijn van Welie

Comments

18 Jan 2005 - 6:55am
jarango
2004

> So what issues do other 'non-Americans' face? In Slovenia, Sweden, Austria
> etc...?

In my country (Panama) there's also less specialization. For example,
it's very hard to sell "information architecture" only -- customers
don't care about that -- they just want their sites to work and to
meet their objectives, and expect the firm that they hire to take care
of all the details.

That means I get to wear a lot of hats besides the IA one, and I
sometimes find myself doing stuff like managing content on the
customers' behalf, or helping them with their search engine
positioning, etc. which I would probably only touch tangentially or
not at all in a more developed market. (This is related to your
comment about becoming an 'intermediate' agency -- we also tend to end
up as the orchestra conductors. Interestingly, this also seems to be
how "brick and mortar" architects work. I digress...)

This can sometimes be frustrating, because I doesn't allow me to go as
deeply into IA/UX as I probably would otherwise. However, I like the
fact that I'm forced to look at other downstream and upstream factors
that usually end up influencing the design in one way or another.

Cheers,

--
Jorge Arango
http://www.jarango.com

18 Jan 2005 - 9:11am
Tadej Maligoj
2004

> > So what issues do other 'non-Americans' face? In Slovenia, Sweden, Austria
> > etc...?

News from Slovenia! ... ;+)

As I said, two million of people on 20.000 sq km2 of earth of
condensed beauty (what else should I say? :+) See more about Slovenia:
http://www.slovenia-tourism.si/?home=0

IT companies
IT in Slovenia is rather developed, but also fragmented. A lot of
ingenius engineers, one big company and plenty of small companies. Big
company means 500 employee (what makes it the biggest IT company in
the area of middle Europe). Small company means 5 to 20. Companies
with 50 employees are rare.

Why is this important?
I myself am a freelance Interface Architect ( I can use this, my basic
education is Architecture ;+). Small companies have small projects.
Small projects seems they can't afford usability. I have proven that
my contribution spare money in project lifecycle, but still there is
hard to convience an owner (ex. engineer) that the project needs
anyone beside the computer programmers.
So there is one big company which I mostly live of. (This makes me a
funny freelancer, though, however, it gives me some more freedom for
projects on different fields of design).
I am a kind of the wizzard which is called in when the costumer needs
"realy good user interface".
There are dozens of projects running in the company at the time,
however, I am needed on some of them only.

What do I want to picture here? That IT companies are not aware of
importance of the quality of user interface themselves. They use a
designer when asked to by a customer.

IT customers
There are two big investors in Slovenia: the best spender is the
government. Next one is a mobile/cell phones provider. As you probably
can guess, they both suffer from abundance crisis. None of them care
much about the quality of IT they order.

The times changes, however. More and more are investors aware of the
big money they spend on IT and start to demand better products.
Interface is of course the first thing they can judge. More works for
UI designers. Fine.

Stil, most production in Slovenia is on the websites. On websites that
directly earns no money. That is the big difference in Slovenia
(compare to The Bay and surroundings ;+). There are very few websites
that actualy earns money. People just do not shop on the net, while
the real shop for most of us is more pleasant to visit than net shop.
(By the way, slovenians spend much more money on amazon.com than on
all the slovenian net shops together).

While there is no way to evaluate the quality of website through
usabiltiy (=profit), the only way to gain glory is to be a winner on
the advertising festival. Great graphic design and bright ideas, not
usabilty.

My work
As a freelancer, I do a lot of different things. Often it seems I am
the only who has a clue how to run a "user centric" project of design
an application. I observe users, study the business process, write
functional requirements, make html model of the user interface,
usability testings, design css stylesheet, cleaning html code, write
manuals, ... Sometimes I seat at the same project for months,
sometimes I just make a visit and do my advising on site in few hours.
Of course my work is not perfect, I can't manage it all. But I try to
do my best. I keep saying: participate a bit is better than do nothing
at all.

I charge 20 - 40 EUR per hour, depends on who hires and for how long.
When fully booked, that gives me - on my opinion - good salary to live
here.

That's for now.

I was a bit nutritious in previous posts, sorry. Thanks to all that
supported me anyway ;+) I am over it.

Tadej

On Tue, 18 Jan 2005 07:55:03 -0500, Jorge Arango <jarango at gmail.com> wrote:
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
> > So what issues do other 'non-Americans' face? In Slovenia, Sweden, Austria
> > etc...?
>
> In my country (Panama) there's also less specialization. For example,
> it's very hard to sell "information architecture" only -- customers
> don't care about that -- they just want their sites to work and to
> meet their objectives, and expect the firm that they hire to take care
> of all the details.
>
> That means I get to wear a lot of hats besides the IA one, and I
> sometimes find myself doing stuff like managing content on the
> customers' behalf, or helping them with their search engine
> positioning, etc. which I would probably only touch tangentially or
> not at all in a more developed market. (This is related to your
> comment about becoming an 'intermediate' agency -- we also tend to end
> up as the orchestra conductors. Interestingly, this also seems to be
> how "brick and mortar" architects work. I digress...)
>
> This can sometimes be frustrating, because I doesn't allow me to go as
> deeply into IA/UX as I probably would otherwise. However, I like the
> fact that I'm forced to look at other downstream and upstream factors
> that usually end up influencing the design in one way or another.
>
> Cheers,
>
> --
> Jorge Arango
> http://www.jarango.com
> _______________________________________________
> Interaction Design Discussion List
> discuss at ixdg.org
> --
> to change your options (unsubscribe or set digest): http://discuss.ixdg.org/
> --
> Questions: lists at ixdg.org
> --
> Announcement Online List (discussion list members get announcements already)
> http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
> --
> http://ixdg.org/
>

--
_______________________________
Tadej Maligoj, Information Architect
e1: tadej.maligoj at gmail.com
e2: studio at maligoj.com
m: 031 306 986
w: www.maligoj.com

18 Jan 2005 - 2:25pm
Listera
2004

Welie, Martijn van:

> For example, it is common to do an entire site redesign for a medium sized
> site for 30.000 EURO (about $50.000 at the current rates).

Do you ever fear that much of this could one day be offshored?

Ziya
Nullius in Verba

18 Jan 2005 - 6:45pm
Tadej Maligoj
2004

There is a website competition going on in Slovenia. It is a good
opportunity to see what slovenian website production is about. It is a
new award and it is about the web excellence.

http://www.izidor.net/ ... then choose Tekmovanje

or direct link to the group lists:

http://www.netkonferenca.net/izidor/tekmovanje/glasuj.jsp?showpage=izidor&reference=http%3A//www.izidor.net/nagrada/

I was judging the group 13, which was rather difficult since there
were corporate sites competing against banners. New born difficulties.

It is all in Slovene language. But some of the links lead to bilingual sites.
Anyway, sometimes it is more easy to evaluate communication without
understand the language.

Take a look. I am curious about your opinion.

Tadej

On Tue, 18 Jan 2005 16:11:17 +0100, Tadej Maligoj
<tadej.maligoj at gmail.com> wrote:
> > > So what issues do other 'non-Americans' face? In Slovenia, Sweden, Austria
> > > etc...?
>
> News from Slovenia! ... ;+)
>
> As I said, two million of people on 20.000 sq km2 of earth of
> condensed beauty (what else should I say? :+) See more about Slovenia:
> http://www.slovenia-tourism.si/?home=0
>
> IT companies
> IT in Slovenia is rather developed, but also fragmented. A lot of
> ingenius engineers, one big company and plenty of small companies. Big
> company means 500 employee (what makes it the biggest IT company in
> the area of middle Europe). Small company means 5 to 20. Companies
> with 50 employees are rare.
>
> Why is this important?
> I myself am a freelance Interface Architect ( I can use this, my basic
> education is Architecture ;+). Small companies have small projects.
> Small projects seems they can't afford usability. I have proven that
> my contribution spare money in project lifecycle, but still there is
> hard to convience an owner (ex. engineer) that the project needs
> anyone beside the computer programmers.
> So there is one big company which I mostly live of. (This makes me a
> funny freelancer, though, however, it gives me some more freedom for
> projects on different fields of design).
> I am a kind of the wizzard which is called in when the costumer needs
> "realy good user interface".
> There are dozens of projects running in the company at the time,
> however, I am needed on some of them only.
>
> What do I want to picture here? That IT companies are not aware of
> importance of the quality of user interface themselves. They use a
> designer when asked to by a customer.
>
> IT customers
> There are two big investors in Slovenia: the best spender is the
> government. Next one is a mobile/cell phones provider. As you probably
> can guess, they both suffer from abundance crisis. None of them care
> much about the quality of IT they order.
>
> The times changes, however. More and more are investors aware of the
> big money they spend on IT and start to demand better products.
> Interface is of course the first thing they can judge. More works for
> UI designers. Fine.
>
> Stil, most production in Slovenia is on the websites. On websites that
> directly earns no money. That is the big difference in Slovenia
> (compare to The Bay and surroundings ;+). There are very few websites
> that actualy earns money. People just do not shop on the net, while
> the real shop for most of us is more pleasant to visit than net shop.
> (By the way, slovenians spend much more money on amazon.com than on
> all the slovenian net shops together).
>
> While there is no way to evaluate the quality of website through
> usabiltiy (=profit), the only way to gain glory is to be a winner on
> the advertising festival. Great graphic design and bright ideas, not
> usabilty.
>
> My work
> As a freelancer, I do a lot of different things. Often it seems I am
> the only who has a clue how to run a "user centric" project of design
> an application. I observe users, study the business process, write
> functional requirements, make html model of the user interface,
> usability testings, design css stylesheet, cleaning html code, write
> manuals, ... Sometimes I seat at the same project for months,
> sometimes I just make a visit and do my advising on site in few hours.
> Of course my work is not perfect, I can't manage it all. But I try to
> do my best. I keep saying: participate a bit is better than do nothing
> at all.
>
> I charge 20 - 40 EUR per hour, depends on who hires and for how long.
> When fully booked, that gives me - on my opinion - good salary to live
> here.
>
> That's for now.
>
> I was a bit nutritious in previous posts, sorry. Thanks to all that
> supported me anyway ;+) I am over it.
>
> Tadej
>
>
> On Tue, 18 Jan 2005 07:55:03 -0500, Jorge Arango <jarango at gmail.com> wrote:
> > [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
> >
> > > So what issues do other 'non-Americans' face? In Slovenia, Sweden, Austria
> > > etc...?
> >
> > In my country (Panama) there's also less specialization. For example,
> > it's very hard to sell "information architecture" only -- customers
> > don't care about that -- they just want their sites to work and to
> > meet their objectives, and expect the firm that they hire to take care
> > of all the details.
> >
> > That means I get to wear a lot of hats besides the IA one, and I
> > sometimes find myself doing stuff like managing content on the
> > customers' behalf, or helping them with their search engine
> > positioning, etc. which I would probably only touch tangentially or
> > not at all in a more developed market. (This is related to your
> > comment about becoming an 'intermediate' agency -- we also tend to end
> > up as the orchestra conductors. Interestingly, this also seems to be
> > how "brick and mortar" architects work. I digress...)
> >
> > This can sometimes be frustrating, because I doesn't allow me to go as
> > deeply into IA/UX as I probably would otherwise. However, I like the
> > fact that I'm forced to look at other downstream and upstream factors
> > that usually end up influencing the design in one way or another.
> >
> > Cheers,
> >
> > --
> > Jorge Arango
> > http://www.jarango.com
> > _______________________________________________
> > Interaction Design Discussion List
> > discuss at ixdg.org
> > --
> > to change your options (unsubscribe or set digest): http://discuss.ixdg.org/
> > --
> > Questions: lists at ixdg.org
> > --
> > Announcement Online List (discussion list members get announcements already)
> > http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
> > --
> > http://ixdg.org/
> >
>
>
> --
> _______________________________
> Tadej Maligoj, Information Architect
> e1: tadej.maligoj at gmail.com
> e2: studio at maligoj.com
> m: 031 306 986
> w: www.maligoj.com
>

--
_______________________________
Tadej Maligoj, Information Architect
e1: tadej.maligoj at gmail.com
e2: studio at maligoj.com
m: 031 306 986
w: www.maligoj.com

18 Jan 2005 - 9:01pm
Listera
2004

Tadej Maligoj:

> It is all in Slovene language.

What can you say about this one:

<http://www.adriatic.si/skocizmano/index.htm>

Ziya
Nullius in Verba

19 Jan 2005 - 12:17am
Tadej Maligoj
2004

This is an insurance company mini site, which opens on click on
banner. Two of slovenian top athletics explain the benefits of
investment in this fond. It looks very spectacular with the movie,
voice, graphs and on-the-fly calculation of your savings through time
based on data entered.

After clicking a while it is clear that this is not quite a powerful
tool. You are soon redirected to the main site (with a telephone
number of the agent: Call now and you save ... ).

It is technologicaly well done (flash) and it is attractive (well,
"movie stars" are not very persuasive). We - as judges - have not
cheked, how well it works for a client; does their site visit rise or
not. It was beyond our purpose.

My favourite is Potres - Earthquake (in group 13). It is a banner that
invites visitors to donate victims. I find this thing technologicaly
brillant (the right use for the right purpose). We have not checked
the efficieny about this either.

Tadej

On Tue, 18 Jan 2005 22:01:58 -0500, Listera <listera at rcn.com> wrote:
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
> Tadej Maligoj:
>
> > It is all in Slovene language.
>
> What can you say about this one:
>
> <http://www.adriatic.si/skocizmano/index.htm>
>
> Ziya
> Nullius in Verba
>
> _______________________________________________
> Interaction Design Discussion List
> discuss at ixdg.org
> --
> to change your options (unsubscribe or set digest): http://discuss.ixdg.org/
> --
> Questions: lists at ixdg.org
> --
> Announcement Online List (discussion list members get announcements already)
> http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
> --
> http://ixdg.org/
>

--
_______________________________
Tadej Maligoj, Information Architect
e1: tadej.maligoj at gmail.com
e2: studio at maligoj.com
m: 031 306 986
w: www.maligoj.com

19 Jan 2005 - 12:24am
Listera
2004

Tadej Maligoj:

> My favourite is Potres - Earthquake (in group 13). It is a banner that
> invites visitors to donate victims. I find this thing technologicaly
> brillant (the right use for the right purpose).

Yes, the effect is very gutsy and jarring. If <blink> could work, it'd be
like this.

Ziya
Nullius in Verba

19 Jan 2005 - 12:28am
Listera
2004

Tadej Maligoj:

> After clicking a while it is clear that this is not quite a powerful
> tool. You are soon redirected to the main site (with a telephone
> number of the agent: Call now and you save ... ).

It reminded me of a Flash app I designed for a French company several months
ago. Mine was contextual and covered the entire functionality of a site in a
simple interface like that one. It was difficult to design deep, that's why
I wondered if they pulled off something elegant there. Thanks for the
explanation.

Ziya
Nullius in Verba

19 Jan 2005 - 9:42pm
Thea
2004

At 01:45 AM 19/01/2005 +0100, Tadej Maligoj wrote:
>[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
>There is a website competition going on in Slovenia. It is a good
>opportunity to see what slovenian website production is about. It is a
>new award and it is about the web excellence.
>
>http://www.izidor.net/ ... then choose Tekmovanje
>
>or direct link to the group lists:
>
>http://www.netkonferenca.net/izidor/tekmovanje/glasuj.jsp?showpage=izidor&reference=http%3A//www.izidor.net/nagrada/
>
>I was judging the group 13, which was rather difficult since there
>were corporate sites competing against banners. New born difficulties.
>
>It is all in Slovene language. But some of the links lead to bilingual sites.
>Anyway, sometimes it is more easy to evaluate communication without
>understand the language.
>
>Take a look. I am curious about your opinion.
>
>Tadej
>
>
>On Tue, 18 Jan 2005 16:11:17 +0100, Tadej Maligoj
><tadej.maligoj at gmail.com> wrote:
> > > > So what issues do other 'non-Americans' face? In Slovenia, Sweden,
> Austria
> > > > etc...?
> >
> > News from Slovenia! ... ;+)
> >
> > As I said, two million of people on 20.000 sq km2 of earth of
> > condensed beauty (what else should I say? :+) See more about Slovenia:
> > http://www.slovenia-tourism.si/?home=0
> >
> > IT companies
> > IT in Slovenia is rather developed, but also fragmented. A lot of
> > ingenius engineers, one big company and plenty of small companies. Big
> > company means 500 employee (what makes it the biggest IT company in
> > the area of middle Europe). Small company means 5 to 20. Companies
> > with 50 employees are rare.
> >
> > Why is this important?
> > I myself am a freelance Interface Architect ( I can use this, my basic
> > education is Architecture ;+). Small companies have small projects.
> > Small projects seems they can't afford usability. I have proven that
> > my contribution spare money in project lifecycle, but still there is
> > hard to convience an owner (ex. engineer) that the project needs
> > anyone beside the computer programmers.
> > So there is one big company which I mostly live of. (This makes me a
> > funny freelancer, though, however, it gives me some more freedom for
> > projects on different fields of design).
> > I am a kind of the wizzard which is called in when the costumer needs
> > "realy good user interface".
> > There are dozens of projects running in the company at the time,
> > however, I am needed on some of them only.
> >
> > What do I want to picture here? That IT companies are not aware of
> > importance of the quality of user interface themselves. They use a
> > designer when asked to by a customer.
> >
> > IT customers
> > There are two big investors in Slovenia: the best spender is the
> > government. Next one is a mobile/cell phones provider. As you probably
> > can guess, they both suffer from abundance crisis. None of them care
> > much about the quality of IT they order.
> >
> > The times changes, however. More and more are investors aware of the
> > big money they spend on IT and start to demand better products.
> > Interface is of course the first thing they can judge. More works for
> > UI designers. Fine.
> >
> > Stil, most production in Slovenia is on the websites. On websites that
> > directly earns no money. That is the big difference in Slovenia
> > (compare to The Bay and surroundings ;+). There are very few websites
> > that actualy earns money. People just do not shop on the net, while
> > the real shop for most of us is more pleasant to visit than net shop.
> > (By the way, slovenians spend much more money on amazon.com than on
> > all the slovenian net shops together).
> >
> > While there is no way to evaluate the quality of website through
> > usabiltiy (=profit), the only way to gain glory is to be a winner on
> > the advertising festival. Great graphic design and bright ideas, not
> > usabilty.
> >
> > My work
> > As a freelancer, I do a lot of different things. Often it seems I am
> > the only who has a clue how to run a "user centric" project of design
> > an application. I observe users, study the business process, write
> > functional requirements, make html model of the user interface,
> > usability testings, design css stylesheet, cleaning html code, write
> > manuals, ... Sometimes I seat at the same project for months,
> > sometimes I just make a visit and do my advising on site in few hours.
> > Of course my work is not perfect, I can't manage it all. But I try to
> > do my best. I keep saying: participate a bit is better than do nothing
> > at all.
> >
> > I charge 20 - 40 EUR per hour, depends on who hires and for how long.
> > When fully booked, that gives me - on my opinion - good salary to live
> > here.
> >
> > That's for now.
> >
> > I was a bit nutritious in previous posts, sorry. Thanks to all that
> > supported me anyway ;+) I am over it.
> >
> > Tadej
> >
> >
> > On Tue, 18 Jan 2005 07:55:03 -0500, Jorge Arango <jarango at gmail.com> wrote:
> > > [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
> > >
> > > > So what issues do other 'non-Americans' face? In Slovenia, Sweden,
> Austria
> > > > etc...?
> > >
> > > In my country (Panama) there's also less specialization. For example,
> > > it's very hard to sell "information architecture" only -- customers
> > > don't care about that -- they just want their sites to work and to
> > > meet their objectives, and expect the firm that they hire to take care
> > > of all the details.
> > >
> > > That means I get to wear a lot of hats besides the IA one, and I
> > > sometimes find myself doing stuff like managing content on the
> > > customers' behalf, or helping them with their search engine
> > > positioning, etc. which I would probably only touch tangentially or
> > > not at all in a more developed market. (This is related to your
> > > comment about becoming an 'intermediate' agency -- we also tend to end
> > > up as the orchestra conductors. Interestingly, this also seems to be
> > > how "brick and mortar" architects work. I digress...)
> > >
> > > This can sometimes be frustrating, because I doesn't allow me to go as
> > > deeply into IA/UX as I probably would otherwise. However, I like the
> > > fact that I'm forced to look at other downstream and upstream factors
> > > that usually end up influencing the design in one way or another.
> > >
> > > Cheers,
> > >
> > > --
> > > Jorge Arango
> > > http://www.jarango.com
> > > _______________________________________________
> > > Interaction Design Discussion List
> > > discuss at ixdg.org
> > > --
> > > to change your options (unsubscribe or set digest):
> http://discuss.ixdg.org/
> > > --
> > > Questions: lists at ixdg.org
> > > --
> > > Announcement Online List (discussion list members get announcements
> already)
> > > http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
> > > --
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Thea Blackler
PhD Candidate
P/T Lecturer in Industrial Design
School of Design and Built Environment
Queensland University of Technology
CRICOS No 00213J.

19 Jan 2005 - 10:35pm
Thea
2004

I am an Aussie (originally from England) working in Australia where of
course we live next to the world's best beaches and rainforests (not to
mention the coral).

I am no longer a practicing designer and IxD is not even my main
specialism. Industrial design is my background but I still find the list
very interesting and informative and have participated at times.

I am a design researcher and lecturer working in a university. One of the
many advantages is that I get the list postings on my email at work rather
than having to do it from home. Therefore I can keep up a bit more with
what is happening during the mronings.

I think this is a great thread and it has been very interesting to hear a
bit more about what goes on outside the US. Hopefully many of us can
continue participating a bit more.

Thea Blackler
Lecturer in Design
Queensland Univeristy of Technology
Brisbane (Moreton Bay)
Australia

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