RFID and other fads

19 Jan 2005 - 4:37pm
9 years ago
12 replies
489 reads
John Vaughan - ...
2004

> According to Dell's CEO, UXP/IXD/all that stuff are just fads.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hula_hoop
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beanie_Babies
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betamax

And his point is....?

Hint: These are some fads that enjoyed tremendous popularity - not to mention "market share" - during their heyday. Some (like the hula hoop) have even enjoyed a retro resurgence.

A couple of sobering thoughts:
* Will Dell still be around in another 20 years?
* Is The Web a fad?
et cetera

Comments

19 Jan 2005 - 5:06pm
Listera
2004

vaughan1 at optonline.net:

> And his point is....?

Buy Dell?

Bill Gates also makes similar remarks from time to time, often about various
Apple hw/sw products, denigrating their impact. We can regard these gems of
wisdom as crude marketing/P.R. moves (they are, obviously), but I think they
also carry a deeper message. The message is: design doesn't matter, design
is faddish, boring is safe, conformity is expected, there's safety in
numbers, etc.

This is not some two-bit mid-level manager spouting ignorance, it's the CEO
of the world's largest PC maker. That's why these people are evil.

Ziya
Nullius in Verba

19 Jan 2005 - 5:41pm
Manu Sharma
2003

Ziya:
> Bill Gates also makes similar remarks from time to time, often about
various
> Apple hw/sw products, denigrating their impact. We can regard these
gems of
> wisdom as crude marketing/P.R. moves (they are, obviously), but I
think they
> also carry a deeper message. The message is: design doesn't matter,
design
> is faddish, boring is safe, conformity is expected, there's safety in
> numbers, etc.
>
> This is not some two-bit mid-level manager spouting ignorance, it's
the CEO
> of the world's largest PC maker. That's why these people are evil.

I agree with Dell not 'getting' design but it's perhaps a bit unfair to
read too much into his statement [crude P.R. moves etc]. Kevin Rollins
did ask us to not read his statement as any sort of disparagement of
Apple. Adding, "they've done a nice job." He even said a few nice words
about Mac Mini. [1]

Dell has been a innovator as well, not in design but in business models
[2]. It is one of the few companies that has always defied market
downturns and produced excellent results.

Manu.

[1] CNet interview of Kevin Rollins <url:
http://news.com.com/Dells+Rollins+Unfazed+by+iPod,+IBM/2008-1082_3-5540420.html>
[2] Fast Company profile of Dell <url:
http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/88/dell.html>

19 Jan 2005 - 5:48pm
Robert Reimann
2003

Ziya wrote:

>> And his point is....?
>
>Buy Dell?
>
> Bill Gates also makes similar remarks from time to time, often about
various Apple hw/sw products, denigrating their > impact. We can regard
these gems of wisdom as crude marketing/P.R. moves (they are, obviously),
but I think they also > carry a deeper message. The message is: design
doesn't matter, design is faddish, boring is safe, conformity is
> expected, there's safety in numbers, etc.
>
> This is not some two-bit mid-level manager spouting ignorance, it's the
CEO of the world's largest PC maker.
> That's why these people are evil.

I'm not going to defend Dell, but there's something
to keep in mind: Dell got where it is primarily by
creating an extremely efficient manufacturing and distribution
operation, while keeping away from high-risk, high investment
technologies. Dell's products are never at the cutting
edge of design, technology, or usability, but they are of
(relatively) high quality and (relatively) low cost.

In a presentation I gave as part of a panel at DIS 2004, I
discussed that business-people and designers are sometimes
speaking about two different things when they use the word
"innovation".

Business-people, especially at the C-level, often think of
innovation in terms of improving process, productivity and
efficiency within the organization, allowing cost savings and
higher profitability.

Designers think of innovation as developing new kinds of
products or experiences for the customer, either by inventing
entirely new technologies or features, or by combining existing
product/service technologies in new, more effective, or
more compelling ways.

These two approaches to innovation are very different, but
each, when executed well, can benefit both the company and the
end customer. I think it behooves each camp to better understand
the other's meaning of innovation, for a company that executes
both well will reap double the rewards.

Robert.

---

Robert Reimann
Manager, User Interface Design

Bose Corporation
The Mountain
Framingham, MA 01701

19 Jan 2005 - 6:13pm
Listera
2004

Manu Sharma:

> I agree with Dell not 'getting' design but it's perhaps a bit unfair to
> read too much into his statement [crude P.R. moves etc]. Kevin Rollins
> did ask us to not read his statement as any sort of disparagement of
> Apple. Adding, "they've done a nice job." He even said a few nice words
> about Mac Mini. [1]

You're jesting? This is the same company that said Apple should close shop
and give AAPL shareholders their money back.

> It is one of the few companies that has always defied market
> downturns and produced excellent results.

Nobody has disputed that. There's always an opportunity to serve the fat
part of the Bell curve. The question is, do you simply acknowledge that and
make your money or pretend that design doesn't matter and dis others? After
all, Dell tried all sorts schemes to compete directly against what it now
considers a fad (Apple's iPod) even to the point of offering people $100 to
switch to its own wretched player. Now that none of that worked, he's
dissing the iPod? Why am I supposed to have sympathy for this nonsense?

Walkman sold 340 million units and established Sony as the then-undisputed
leader of consumer electronics in the world. How's that a fad?

Ziya
Nullius in Verba

19 Jan 2005 - 6:10pm
Frank Ramirez
2004

To elaborate Robert's point, I think Doblin's "Ten types of innovation"
is a good model to apply when evaluating the innovativeness of products
and companies. Take note that Customer Experience is but 1/10th of the
equation.
http://www.doblin.com/pov/TenTypesOverview.html

Frank

> -----Original Message-----
> From:
> discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesi
> gners.com
> [mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interac
> tiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Reimann, Robert
> Sent: Wednesday, January 19, 2005 2:49 PM
> To: IxD
> Subject: RE: [ID Discuss] RFID and other fads
>
>
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant
> quoted material.]
>
>
> Ziya wrote:
>
> >> And his point is....?
> >
> >Buy Dell?
> >
> > Bill Gates also makes similar remarks from time to time, often about
> various Apple hw/sw products, denigrating their > impact. We
> can regard these gems of wisdom as crude marketing/P.R. moves
> (they are, obviously), but I think they also > carry a deeper
> message. The message is: design doesn't matter, design is
> faddish, boring is safe, conformity is
> > expected, there's safety in numbers, etc.
> >
> > This is not some two-bit mid-level manager spouting ignorance, it's
> > the
> CEO of the world's largest PC maker.
> > That's why these people are evil.
>
> I'm not going to defend Dell, but there's something
> to keep in mind: Dell got where it is primarily by
> creating an extremely efficient manufacturing and
> distribution operation, while keeping away from high-risk,
> high investment technologies. Dell's products are never at
> the cutting edge of design, technology, or usability, but they are of
> (relatively) high quality and (relatively) low cost.
>
> In a presentation I gave as part of a panel at DIS 2004, I
> discussed that business-people and designers are sometimes
> speaking about two different things when they use the word
> "innovation".
>
> Business-people, especially at the C-level, often think of
> innovation in terms of improving process, productivity and
> efficiency within the organization, allowing cost savings and
> higher profitability.
>
> Designers think of innovation as developing new kinds of
> products or experiences for the customer, either by inventing
> entirely new technologies or features, or by combining
> existing product/service technologies in new, more effective,
> or more compelling ways.
>
> These two approaches to innovation are very different, but
> each, when executed well, can benefit both the company and
> the end customer. I think it behooves each camp to better
> understand the other's meaning of innovation, for a company
> that executes both well will reap double the rewards.
>
> Robert.
>
> ---
>
> Robert Reimann
> Manager, User Interface Design
>
> Bose Corporation
> The Mountain
> Framingham, MA 01701
>
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> discuss at ixdg.org
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19 Jan 2005 - 6:17pm
Listera
2004

Reimann, Robert:

> These two approaches to innovation are very different

Innovation is innovation.

Ziya
Nullius in Verba

19 Jan 2005 - 6:38pm
Manu Sharma
2003

Ziya:
"Dell tried all sorts schemes to compete directly against what it now
considers a fad (Apple's iPod) even to the point of offering people
$100 to switch to its own wretched player. Now that none of that
worked, he's dissing the iPod? Why am I supposed to have sympathy for
this nonsense?"

You're not. Apple is on a resurgence. It has already thwarted Dell's
attempt at entering the consumer goods market which Dell now labels as
'not profitable enough'. It's not difficult to envision Apple giving it
a tough time in the future in PCs as well.

So, they'll learn their lesson if they haven't already. All I'm saying
is that just because Dell doesn't get design is no reason to call it
ignorant, evil and employing crude marketing moves. It doesn't need any
attention nor does it deserve these labels. There are legends of Dell's
innovation...let's give respect where it's due.

Manu.

19 Jan 2005 - 7:05pm
Listera
2004

Manu Sharma:

> All I'm saying is that just because Dell doesn't get design is no reason to
> call it ignorant...

Ignorant of DESIGN.

I don't care about Dell, except when they dis design/innovation, which
hopefully we all do care about.

Ziya
Nullius in Verba

19 Jan 2005 - 7:16pm
Manu Sharma
2003

Ziya:
"I don't care about Dell, except when they dis design/innovation [...]"

So you accept, there are two kinds of innovation? :-)

Manu.

19 Jan 2005 - 7:22pm
Listera
2004

Manu Sharma:

> So you accept, there are two kinds of innovation? :-)

Nope. It all boils down to: would you want to have dinner with Kevin Rollins
or Steve Jobs (even if you had to eat vegan)?

Ziya
Nullius in Verba

19 Jan 2005 - 8:00pm
Manu Sharma
2003

Manu:
"So you accept, there are two kinds of innovation?"

Ziya:
"Nope. It all boils down to: would you want to have dinner with Kevin
Rollins or Steve Jobs (even if you had to eat vegan)?"

Oh, I'd choose Steve Jobs without thinking -- this man has vision (a
vegan diet won't make a difference since I'm a veggie). I love Apple
and its CEO for everything they stand for. I'd choose Apple without
doubt.

But this is only a personal preference. I also know that if you look at
the big picture, despite all its achievements, Apple's _past_ is
largely considered a story of lost opportunity. Micheal Dell's past, on
the other hand, is considered to be one of remarkable innovation and
success. Of course, it's anybody's guess what happens in the future.

Manu.

20 Jan 2005 - 5:07am
Rob van Kranenburg
2005

Hi,

In this respect perhaps my "Real Rules of Innovation for the 21th
century" might also be useful
http://www.noemalab.org/sections/ideas/ideas_35.html

salut! Rob.

>To elaborate Robert's point, I think Doblin's "Ten types of innovation"
>is a good model to apply ....
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