1 Year Masters Course in Interaction Design

19 Jan 2010 - 5:25am
2 years ago
35 replies
16067 reads
Himanshu Agrawal
2009

Hello Everyone,
I want to pursue one year Masters course in Interaction Design.
Can you please suggest some good Design Instiutes of US and Europe which
offers
1 Year Masters Course in Interaction Design.

Thank You.
--
Himanshu

Comments

19 Jan 2010 - 5:54am
uxtweaker
2009

Have a look at this one! Not sure about the coursework itself but the
school and the teachers are great!

http://www.mdx.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/computing_and_it/interaction_design_msc.aspx

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48436

19 Jan 2010 - 6:11am
olgu demir
2010

Hi,
I am also looking for masters and phd courses in IntD. Also do anyone know
any online library or any source that i can find some articles and ebooks
about IntD?

Thanks.

Olgu
www.silo-1.com

On Tue, Jan 19, 2010 at 4:25 AM, Himanshu Agrawal <
architecthimanshu at gmail.com> wrote:

> Hello Everyone,
> I want to pursue one year Masters course in Interaction Design.
> Can you please suggest some good Design Instiutes of US and Europe which
> offers
> 1 Year Masters Course in Interaction Design.
>
> Thank You.
> --
> Himanshu
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Reply to this thread at ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48436
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

19 Jan 2010 - 6:02am
Jordi Parra
2010

I don't know that much about interaction MAs in the US, but right
now, in Europe, I think the biggest two are at CIID and Umeå
Institute of Design.

CIID is one year and Umeå's MA degree is two years long. You can
check their websites:

CIID: http://ciid.dk/education
Umeå Institute of Design: http://www.dh.umu.se

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48436

19 Jan 2010 - 7:15am
SemanticWill
2007

To the best of my knowledge - 1. all masters programs in IxD/Design
are 2 years; 2. there are no phds in IxD.

Sorry.

~ will

"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Will Evans | Director, Experience Design
tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
http://blog.semanticfoundry.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/semanticwill
aim: semanticwill
gtalk: semanticwill
twitter: semanticwill
skype: semanticwill
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

On Jan 19, 2010, at 6:11 AM, olgu demir wrote:

> Hi,
> I am also looking for masters and phd courses in IntD. Also do
> anyone know
> any online library or any source that i can find some articles and
> ebooks
> about IntD?
>
> Thanks.
>
> Olgu
> www.silo-1.com
>
> On Tue, Jan 19, 2010 at 4:25 AM, Himanshu Agrawal <
> architecthimanshu at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Hello Everyone,
>> I want to pursue one year Masters course in Interaction Design.
>> Can you please suggest some good Design Instiutes of US and Europe
>> which
>> offers
>> 1 Year Masters Course in Interaction Design.
>>
>> Thank You.
>> --
>> Himanshu
>>
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Reply to this thread at ixda.org
>> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48436
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

19 Jan 2010 - 7:28am
Rob Nero
2005

Malmö, Sweden, has a 2 year Masters in IxD, along with PhD's in IxD too.

www.ixdmalmo.se
(though the site is currently being developed more)

19 Jan 2010 - 7:28am
Dave Malouf
2005

The 1-yr course at CIID does not offers a Masters Degree. It DOES
offer a certificate.

Does a graduate certificate like this fill a market need? I am
considering what it might mean to develop a program like this in the
US, but not sure if a title-less program is of value to students and
employers.

-- dave

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48436

19 Jan 2010 - 8:41am
Will Hacker
2009

DePaul in Chicago offers an MS in HCI. It is 13 courses, so more like
two years if attending full time.
http://www.cdm.depaul.edu/academics/Pages/MSinHuman-ComputerInteraction.aspx

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48436

19 Jan 2010 - 11:31am
Hugh Griffith
2007

Just to play devil's advocate, what's a masters degree in ID going to get
you other than a depleted bank account? (FYI, I'm assuming ID refers to web
interaction.)

It seems like such a specialized field that most employers wouldn't really
care.

Hugh Griffith
User Interface Designer

On Tue, Jan 19, 2010 at 5:28 AM, Rob Nero <rob at nerointerfaces.com> wrote:

> Malmö, Sweden, has a 2 year Masters in IxD, along with PhD's in IxD too.
>
> www.ixdmalmo.se
> (though the site is currently being developed more)
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

19 Jan 2010 - 11:51am
Mark Schraad
2006

Hugh,

We have more than 30 IA's (we call them UXA's) in our group and close
to 75% have graduate degrees in Interaction design, HCI or an MBA. It
is not a critical criteria in our hiring process, but it's sure become
the norm amongst those able to show ability, experience and knowledge.
Does that help?

Mark

On Jan 19, 2010, at 10:31 AM, Hugh Griffith wrote:

> Just to play devil's advocate, what's a masters degree in ID going
> to get
> you other than a depleted bank account? (FYI, I'm assuming ID refers
> to web
> interaction.)
>
> It seems like such a specialized field that most employers wouldn't
> really
> care.
>
> Hugh Griffith
> User Interface Designer
>
>
> On Tue, Jan 19, 2010 at 5:28 AM, Rob Nero <rob at nerointerfaces.com>
> wrote:
>
>> Malmö, Sweden, has a 2 year Masters in IxD, along with PhD's in IxD
>> too.
>>
>> www.ixdmalmo.se
>> (though the site is currently being developed more)
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

19 Jan 2010 - 11:56am
Renee Rosen-Wakeford
2008

All UK taught masters are 1 year only. Most aren't in interaction design but
in HCI or usability.

If the original poster is only looking for IxD courses, there are a couple I
know of - I don't know much about the programs, except that they exist.

http://www.kingston.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/digital-media-institute-courses/
http://www-hcid.soi.city.ac.uk/

If they are interested in HCI courses as well, I can highly recommend the
HCI MSc from UCL that I did. It doesn't just cover design, but it is part of
the coursework. (I'm assuming other HCI courses are similar.)

http://www.uclic.ucl.ac.uk/

I don't know if there are any PhDs in IxD in the UK, but there are ones in
HCI, and you could specialise in IxD.

Hope that helps.

Renée

On Tue, Jan 19, 2010 at 12:15 PM, Will Evans <will at semanticfoundry.com>wrote:

> To the best of my knowledge - 1. all masters programs in IxD/Design are 2
> years; 2. there are no phds in IxD.
>
> Sorry.
>
>
> ~ will
>
> "Where you innovate, how you innovate,
> and what you innovate are design problems"
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Will Evans | Director, Experience Design
> tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
> http://blog.semanticfoundry.com
> http://www.linkedin.com/in/semanticwill
> aim: semanticwill
> gtalk: semanticwill
> twitter: semanticwill
> skype: semanticwill
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> On Jan 19, 2010, at 6:11 AM, olgu demir wrote:
>
> Hi,
>> I am also looking for masters and phd courses in IntD. Also do anyone know
>> any online library or any source that i can find some articles and ebooks
>> about IntD?
>>
>> Thanks.
>>
>> Olgu
>> www.silo-1.com
>>
>> On Tue, Jan 19, 2010 at 4:25 AM, Himanshu Agrawal <
>> architecthimanshu at gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> Hello Everyone,
>>> I want to pursue one year Masters course in Interaction Design.
>>> Can you please suggest some good Design Instiutes of US and Europe which
>>> offers
>>> 1 Year Masters Course in Interaction Design.
>>>
>>> Thank You.
>>> --
>>> Himanshu
>>>
>>>
>>> ________________________________________________________________
>>> Reply to this thread at ixda.org
>>> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48436
>>>
>>> ________________________________________________________________
>>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>>
>>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
Renée Rosen-Wakeford
reneerw at gmail.com
Twitter: @lilitu93

19 Jan 2010 - 11:59am
Dave Malouf
2005

Hugh,
cynicism aside, it really all depends on who you are what it will get
you.

First, I know of few programs that are "web interaction" programs.
I'm not saying that they are bad, but most "interaction design"
programs include all facets of designing for behavior. Product,
Interface, Service, Space.

But they are an opportunity to hone your craft, get more grounded
theory to back your craft decisions. Gain skills in collaboration,
etc.

Can you get a lot of this on your own? Hell yea!

But I challenge anyone to get the same level of depth in the real
world in 2-3 years that you'll get from many of the design programs
that people are talking about.

-- dave

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48436

19 Jan 2010 - 12:19pm
Hugh Griffith
2007

Good grief! That's a lot of IA's. I'd like to work somewhere there's even
one. :)

I'm thinking about this like a "realist" I suppose. (And that's probably not
even the right term I'm looking for!) That's a lot of time and money for
something that really isn't going to get you *that* far ahead. I understand
if you had your heart set on working at a GSSC (that's "giant, soul sucking,
corporation" for you folks at home), having that might elevate you above the
crowd a bit. But, for most I would think working and learning on your own
would be better in the short term, *and* still have the long term benefits.

Don't get me wrong, school is great. But, school usually means debt (for
most of us), and debt can really mess up your life and limit your career
options. Especially in this economy!

Anyhoo, best of luck whichever road they travel down.

Hugh Griffith
User Interface Designer

On Tue, Jan 19, 2010 at 9:51 AM, mark schraad <mschraad at gmail.com> wrote:

> Hugh,
>
> We have more than 30 IA's (we call them UXA's) in our group and close to
> 75% have graduate degrees in Interaction design, HCI or an MBA. It is not a
> critical criteria in our hiring process, but it's sure become the norm
> amongst those able to show ability, experience and knowledge. Does that
> help?
>
> Mark
>
>
>
>
> On Jan 19, 2010, at 10:31 AM, Hugh Griffith wrote:
>
> Just to play devil's advocate, what's a masters degree in ID going to get
>> you other than a depleted bank account? (FYI, I'm assuming ID refers to
>> web
>> interaction.)
>>
>> It seems like such a specialized field that most employers wouldn't really
>> care.
>>
>> Hugh Griffith
>> User Interface Designer
>>
>>
>> On Tue, Jan 19, 2010 at 5:28 AM, Rob Nero <rob at nerointerfaces.com> wrote:
>>
>> Malmö, Sweden, has a 2 year Masters in IxD, along with PhD's in IxD too.
>>>
>>> www.ixdmalmo.se
>>> (though the site is currently being developed more)
>>>
>>> ________________________________________________________________
>>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>>
>>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
>
>

19 Jan 2010 - 12:30pm
Mark Schraad
2006

Hugh,

I think part of the issue is where you come from. Very few of the IA/
Ixd's I have worked with have a background or undergrad in design.
There are a lot reasons to move into the interactive field, and that
often occurs after the undrgrad work and in fact after some real world
eye opening work. That has been a very powerful and successful pattern
in our field.

The GSSC as you called it is a sometimes slow moving, but very big
stage to work on. It that floats your boat it is out there. There are
also plenty of start ups and small shops, agencies and even academia.
As with any purchase (and grad school should be handled as a very
large purchase) you should evaluate what you get out of it both
financially and otherwise. The demand is very hot for well trained and
smart interaction folks that can land at a desk and be productive in a
short time.

Like Dave M says in another message on this post... you can get a lot,
if not all of this stuff working in the rights spot or company, but
not as intense or as quickly - and without the paper.

Mark

On Jan 19, 2010, at 11:19 AM, Hugh Griffith wrote:

> Good grief! That's a lot of IA's. I'd like to work somewhere there's
> even
> one. :)
>
> I'm thinking about this like a "realist" I suppose. (And that's
> probably not
> even the right term I'm looking for!) That's a lot of time and money
> for
> something that really isn't going to get you *that* far ahead. I
> understand
> if you had your heart set on working at a GSSC (that's "giant, soul
> sucking,
> corporation" for you folks at home), having that might elevate you
> above the
> crowd a bit. But, for most I would think working and learning on
> your own
> would be better in the short term, *and* still have the long term
> benefits.
>
> Don't get me wrong, school is great. But, school usually means debt
> (for
> most of us), and debt can really mess up your life and limit your
> career
> options. Especially in this economy!
>
> Anyhoo, best of luck whichever road they travel down.
>
> Hugh Griffith
> User Interface Designer
>
>
> On Tue, Jan 19, 2010 at 9:51 AM, mark schraad <mschraad at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>> Hugh,
>>
>> We have more than 30 IA's (we call them UXA's) in our group and
>> close to
>> 75% have graduate degrees in Interaction design, HCI or an MBA. It
>> is not a
>> critical criteria in our hiring process, but it's sure become the
>> norm
>> amongst those able to show ability, experience and knowledge. Does
>> that
>> help?
>>
>> Mark
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Jan 19, 2010, at 10:31 AM, Hugh Griffith wrote:
>>
>> Just to play devil's advocate, what's a masters degree in ID going
>> to get
>>> you other than a depleted bank account? (FYI, I'm assuming ID
>>> refers to
>>> web
>>> interaction.)
>>>
>>> It seems like such a specialized field that most employers
>>> wouldn't really
>>> care.
>>>
>>> Hugh Griffith
>>> User Interface Designer
>>>
>>>
>>> On Tue, Jan 19, 2010 at 5:28 AM, Rob Nero <rob at nerointerfaces.com>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Malmö, Sweden, has a 2 year Masters in IxD, along with PhD's in
>>> IxD too.
>>>>
>>>> www.ixdmalmo.se
>>>> (though the site is currently being developed more)
>>>>
>>>> ________________________________________________________________
>>>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>>>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>>>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>>>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>>>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>>>
>>>> ________________________________________________________________
>>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>>
>>
>>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

19 Jan 2010 - 12:35pm
Hugh Griffith
2007

Noted, Dave. But I would expect an answer like that from a design professor!
:D

I kid, I kid.

I know my opinions are completely tainted by my own experiences. But, I
think it's important to think about. All that knowledge does me no good when
I'm stuck in a job I don't like because I have to pay off debt.

I know that's a *whole* other discussion though, so I'll shut the hell up.

Thanks for indulging me. :)

Hugh Griffith
User Interface Designer

On Tue, Jan 19, 2010 at 1:59 AM, dave malouf <dave.ixd at gmail.com> wrote:

> Hugh,
> cynicism aside, it really all depends on who you are what it will get
> you.
>
> First, I know of few programs that are "web interaction" programs.
> I'm not saying that they are bad, but most "interaction design"
> programs include all facets of designing for behavior. Product,
> Interface, Service, Space.
>
> But they are an opportunity to hone your craft, get more grounded
> theory to back your craft decisions. Gain skills in collaboration,
> etc.
>
> Can you get a lot of this on your own? Hell yea!
>
> But I challenge anyone to get the same level of depth in the real
> world in 2-3 years that you'll get from many of the design programs
> that people are talking about.
>
> -- dave
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48436
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

19 Jan 2010 - 12:52pm
Jack L. Moffett
2005

On Jan 19, 2010, at 12:35 PM, Hugh Griffith wrote:

> All that knowledge does me no good when
> I'm stuck in a job I don't like because I have to pay off debt.

Hugh,

Part of the reason for getting the degree is to get a job that you DO like. I got one that I absolutely love, and I have my Masters degree to thank for it.

Another part of the reason is to get a job that will comfortably pay off the debt. I don't consider it a purchase so much as an investment.

Best,
Jack

Jack L. Moffett
Senior Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.459.0310 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

If there's anything more annoying
than a machine that won't do what you want,
it's a machine that won't do what you want
and has been programmed to behave
as though it likes you.

- Don Norman

19 Jan 2010 - 12:59pm
Dan Saffer
2003

On Jan 19, 2010, at 9:19 AM, Hugh Griffith wrote:

> Don't get me wrong, school is great. But, school usually means debt (for
> most of us), and debt can really mess up your life and limit your career
> options. Especially in this economy!

School does mean debt, but it also, in study after study, equates to higher earnings. Just for one example, see last year's Coroflot survey:

<http://www.coroflot.com/designersalary/images/education_x_field.gif>

Granted, the difference there seems to be slight, but even a 5 or 10k difference means that graduate school would pay for itself after ten years. And some companies won't even look at you without one. But your career path is your career path. Weigh the pros and cons and decide where you want to be in five or ten years, and then figure out how to get the skills you'll need to get there (or once you're there).

Dan

19 Jan 2010 - 1:49pm
Phil Chung
2007

I think Himanshu's initial question (and Olgu's follow up) reflects a common need within the design community, specifically among experienced / working designers, many of whom got into IxD without formal training. If I look closely at the initial query from Himanshu I see:

- "good" (a rigorous program at an institution with a strong brand)
- short (1 year or less, possibly reflecting a need to continue working)

Olgu asks for, "an online library or source...[for] articles and ebooks about IntD."

I've brought this up before (and was hammered down for it), but I still believe there is a huge
opportunity for a one-year "executive" / part-time IxD masters program for the experienced
designer, who is seeking to refine their craft and gain some
academic credibility without quitting his / her job. As Hugh and others have brought up, many of us cannot realistically take time off from work for financial reasons. Moreover, in some ways part-time education is more effective. I'm 2/3 through a part-time MBA program now, and find the combination
of coursework while working to be especially effective from an
educational / vocational standpoint, by being able to apply what I learn in the
classroom directly to my work.

Despite objections that were raised the last time I voiced this opinion -- that design can only be taught properly in a classroom -- I know this type of program is coming, and why not? Many interaction designers work remotely. I envision a one-year IxD masters program for the experienced working professional (designer): distance-learning (e.g., Lynda.com) with in-person crits. As many of us know, CCA has already started something like it for design strategy. These type of programs have taken off in business education (e.g., the Jack Welch MBA, weekend executive MBA programs, etc.) at some very reputable institutions (e.g., Duke, Indiana), and I know it's only a matter of time before the design schools catch on.

Ironically, it's the academics in business who have been more innovative and forward thinking in their willingness to accept web-based education than those of us in IxD. Granted, they are possibly more profit-motivated than us.. or are they?

Phil

________________________________
From: Dan Saffer <dan at odannyboy.com>
To: IXDA list <discuss at ixda.org>
Sent: Tue, January 19, 2010 12:59:58 PM
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] 1 Year Masters Course in Interaction Design

On Jan 19, 2010, at 9:19 AM, Hugh Griffith wrote:

> Don't get me wrong, school is great. But, school usually means debt (for
> most of us), and debt can really mess up your life and limit your career
> options. Especially in this economy!

School does mean debt, but it also, in study after study, equates to higher earnings. Just for one example, see last year's Coroflot survey:

<http://www.coroflot.com/designersalary/images/education_x_field.gif>

Granted, the difference there seems to be slight, but even a 5 or 10k difference means that graduate school would pay for itself after ten years. And some companies won't even look at you without one. But your career path is your career path. Weigh the pros and cons and decide where you want to be in five or ten years, and then figure out how to get the skills you'll need to get there (or once you're there).

Dan

________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

9 Aug 2011 - 4:50pm
fclaros
2011

Phil mentions the possibility of Distance-Learning Interaction Design or HCI Masters. Does anyone know if such studies already exist? I live in Spain and cannot move abroad to study, so - even if the master I find is not as good as it would be in other place - it would be my only option. 

Thanks in advance, 

Fernando. 

19 Jan 2010 - 2:28pm
susandoran
2010

One thing people haven't mentioned yet is this.

Although our allied professions are still pretty young---for better and
worse---we're now moving beyond the early, unstructured, anything-goes,
invent-on-the-fly, "entrepreneurial" phase.

Just 10 years ago, our communications, connections, networks, learning,
sharing were largely informal -- and free.

*Fundamental* group values emerged re: ourselves and our shiny Y2K and 2.0
world --- i.e., self-organizing, nonhierarchical, everyone-is-an-expert,
inclusive, non-elite, nonlinear, open-source, embracing complexity ambiguity
risk, highly collaborative -- owing much to hackers and anarchists.

Remember all the tattoos, piercings, dreads, weird hats, truly funky glasses
(not merely expensive designer specs)?

That wasn't just silly young "students" or superficial fashion --- but a
reflection of the values of many who showed up and contributed.

And who, in their "professional" environments, were as credible (often more
so, in our area of knowledge) as the guy in khakis and a polo. Which was
radical, and *unprecedented, *in the world of commerce and work. A total
paradigm shifter.

Get-togethers happened -- virtually, locally, nationally, globally --
discussion forums, conferences sprang up. A sense of loose group
self-identity formed. Models, processes, toolkits, bodies of knowledge
emerged and were shared, improved upon, embellished, debated, discussed,
tossed when not useful.

Then -- as happens in bodies and systems -- thought leaders and then
commerce leaders codified and trademarked their approaches, published,
positioned as "experts" quite separate from their audiences, developed
"followings," established their own schools of thought. And
then....literally schools.

Part of it is a matter of scale. It's tempting to say the original
"non-model" was unsustainable in perpetuity -- i.e., if it were sustainable
it would still be as open-ended as it was.

But more, it's the natural progression and lifecycle of self-forming
groups------> formalized institutions.

Also, it reflects the reality of what happens when profit is to be made by
cleaving off parts of a body of knowledge and owning and selling them.

And nothing like a mortgage and children to shift an individual's priorities
from a freeform, nonpredictable professional and personal life to security,
management positions, and tenure. When those life changes happen to people
who've been positioned -- and positioned themselves -- to be leaders in a
new profession, it can shift the direction and priorities for the entire
profession.

The up-side of course is now theer are schools that anyone -- anyone who's
priveleged to afford it -- can be exposed to these experts, and to the body
of knowledge that has been determined to reflect "best thinking." The
upside is that really smart people can be accessed in a formal deliberate
manner. You can actually have regular conversations with them or be their
research assistant. You can spend 2 years with other people passionate about
this stuff really digging and diving into it, exploring, learning,
contributing, creating. **

Maybe it used to be that our "grad school experience" was sort of our lives
and informal connections -- and maybe it's just not practicable for many of
us to attend both to mundane realities of time and multiple conflicting
priorities AND to be learning, sharing, experimenting, at the level of
intensity, etc.

But part of grad school is not the skills/tactics conveyed (it's grad school
--- not voc/tech) -- but enculturation and socialization into a profession.
In a way that's UNIQUE to each institution and each profession. Each school
develops and markets its unique niches and approaches. That's what attracts
funding -- and of course grad schools are partly in the business of
perpetuating the institution itself -- not nefariously, but schools only
exist if funded. Graduates of these schools wave their school's flags (I do
mine...it's not a new degree but I still believe it's one of the most
kick-assed programs I could've gone to).

What it also means is the same people who graduate from these programs will
have a set idea of what is the "right" way to do things -- and will have
preference for hiring and listening to others who went to their grad school
or other similarly respected grad schools (or where their friends and
respected colleagues went/teach).

What that means possibly on the downside, to the marketplace of ideas,
is....ironically many of the same people who passionately decried
institutionalization of knowledge and "expertise" as being hierarchical,
exclusionary, and elite....is greater difficulty in introducing new and
unvetted ideas on equal footing if you're a "nobody" without grad school,
people quoting professors and thought leading authors, speaking in citations
instead of inventing on the fly. The emergence of new conventional wisdom
(which I know many of you who're teaching might find offensive or
inaccurate, but it's not)

What it also means is students with a 1- or 2-year degree will emerge with a
recognizable uniform skillset, and portfolio. This becomes the standard
bearer. If an existing professional's portfolio does not reflect that same
tactical thinking and output, it will become (is becoming) increasingly
difficult for their value to be measured.

So, grad school is not just about skills acquisition. And not just about
"alumni." It reflects and excelerates our allied professions' maturation.
As with any creative brilliant frontier-exploring barricade-pushing
profession of the past.

Anecdote: my great great grandfather was an attorney, constitutional scholar
(stuff still taught in law schools), abolitionist, and judge. He didn't go
to law school, as it was optional back then -- you just had to pass the bar
exam. One generation later that wasn't the case.

As Dan and others have suggested: think about your life in 5-10 years. The
reality is hundreds(?) of people are emerging into the employment
marketplace with graduate degrees. This is a shortcut for employers to know
someone knows their stuff. Because if you get a grad degree it will truly be
intellectually and creatively challenging -- and you will be more current in
terms of market expectations.

- Susan

On Tue, Jan 19, 2010 at 12:59 PM, Dan Saffer <dan at odannyboy.com> wrote:

>
> On Jan 19, 2010, at 9:19 AM, Hugh Griffith wrote:
>
> > Don't get me wrong, school is great. But, school usually means debt (for
> > most of us), and debt can really mess up your life and limit your career
> > options. Especially in this economy!
>
> School does mean debt, but it also, in study after study, equates to higher
> earnings. Just for one example, see last year's Coroflot survey:
>
> <http://www.coroflot.com/designersalary/images/education_x_field.gif>
>
> Granted, the difference there seems to be slight, but even a 5 or 10k
> difference means that graduate school would pay for itself after ten years.
> And some companies won't even look at you without one. But your career path
> is your career path. Weigh the pros and cons and decide where you want to be
> in five or ten years, and then figure out how to get the skills you'll need
> to get there (or once you're there).
>
> Dan
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Susan Doran
55 Morning Street
Portland ME 04101
207-774-4963 (land)
202-296-4849 (cell)

/susandoran (facebook)
@susandoran (twitter)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

19 Jan 2010 - 6:14pm
cjwillet
2009

Most Master's programs are two years. If you are looking on the East
coast here, definitely check out:

M.S. Interaction Design and Information Architecture -University of
Baltimore - http://iat.ubalt.edu/IDIA/

M.F.A Interaction Design - SVA - http://interactiondesign.sva.edu/

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48436

19 Jan 2010 - 12:09pm
Jay Steele
2009

@himanshu - Like Will said, a master's degree in the US will
typically take two years. The HCI/d master's at Indiana University
requires 36 credit hours to graduate. Technically, you could do that
in about 16 months if you took classes in the summer. For more info
on our program, check out the website:
http://xavier.informatics.indiana.edu/gradsites/hcid/masters/

Just for clarification purposes in response to Will's comment,
Indiana does offer a PhD in Human-Computer Interaction Design. We are
still waiting to award the first degree but several students are in
the final dissertation stages. For more info, check out the site:
http://xavier.informatics.indiana.edu/gradsites/hcid/phd/

@Hugh - First, you can get a master's without depleting your bank
account AND without accumulating any debt if you really want to.
Second, here is some information that will answer the question as to
"what it will get you".

What we%u2019ve accomplished
%u2022 Won the student design competition and the student research
competition at the CHI conference five times.
%u2022 Had at least one team invited to the student design
competition at the CHI conference every year since it's inception.
%u2022 Won the International Usability Professional Association
student design competition.
%u2022 Won the interface design category of Microsoft%u2019s Imagine
Cup in 2008 (one of only two US teams to win).
%u2022 Placed second in the design category of Imagine Cup 2009, and
won the accessible design award, a special commendation for which the
final six teams competed.

Where we go - Opportunities for HCI/d students are plentiful when
combined with tangible skills in technology and business. Our program
provides exactly that mix. Our graduates have gone to work for
(whether as an intern or full-time) Accenture, Adaptive Path, Adobe,
AOL, ARC World Wide, Cerner Corporation, CIBER, Cisco Systems, Cook
Medical, Design Kitchen, Disney Animation Studios, EA, eComplex, Epic
Systems, Google, Hewlett Packard, Intuit, Level, Lexmark, Manhatten
Associates, Microsoft, NAVTEQ, Option Six, Oracle, Pearson Education,
Siemens, Volkswagen, Whirlpool.

I am sure that Dave and others can give you many more examples of the
benefits of an IxD Master's degree.

@Dave - I think the "certificate" issue is a very pertinent
question and deserves further exploration. Don't want to hijack this
thread but would like to find out where employers stand on this.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48436

19 Jan 2010 - 12:26pm
Anonymous

Hi,
I have heard quite a name for these institutes for interaction
design.

Domus Academy - http://www.domusacademy.com/eng/index.php

INTERACTION DESIGN INSTITUTE IVREA -
http://interactionivrea.org/en/about/interactiondesign/index.asp

Plus I did research about MS Design in IxD at Arizona State
University. Seemed like a decent program.

And I do agree with Griffith. You can look at some other broader
programs like Human Factors or HCI. And you can have a healthy dose
of factors you need to consider for a career in IxD.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48436

19 Jan 2010 - 10:56am
Anonymous

- Carnegie Mellon offers a one year program in HCI
(http://www.hcii.cmu.edu/) and a two year program in IxD
(http://www.design.cmu.edu/show_program.php?s=2&t=1); they also offer
a PhD program in Design
- Georgia Tech offers a two year program in HCI:
http://www.cc.gatech.edu/education/grad/ms-hci/overview

I don't know how good the programs are, but it would be worth
looking into.

- Jared

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48436

20 Jan 2010 - 5:02am
Turgay Oktem
2008

London College of Communication offers a one year MA program in
Interactive Media. I hear it's pretty reputable:

http://maimm.arts.ac.uk/

On Tue, Jan 19, 2010 at 9:56 AM, Jared <jpearce at sandia.gov> wrote:
>  - Carnegie Mellon offers a one year program in HCI
> (http://www.hcii.cmu.edu/) and a two year program in IxD
> (http://www.design.cmu.edu/show_program.php?s=2&t=1); they also offer
> a PhD program in Design
>  - Georgia Tech offers a two year program in HCI:
> http://www.cc.gatech.edu/education/grad/ms-hci/overview
>
> I don't know how good the programs are, but it would be worth
> looking into.
>
> - Jared
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48436
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

21 Jan 2010 - 1:31pm
mattinteractive
2010

@Susan: that was terribly insightful. And I, as a higher education
advocate, whole-heartedly agree.

I also think that continuing formal education contributes to
developing one's moral and social character.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48436

24 Jan 2010 - 2:45pm
Chris Braunsdorf
2008

One perspective that I'd like to offer on this discussion is the
difference between working as a consultant vs. working as part of an
internal UX team. As someone who came to IA/usability/UX myself
almost a dozen years ago with no formal training (undergrad major was
History), I've often had this discussion with myself - would it be
worth the time and money to go back and get a grad degree in IX or
HCI? Besides the fact that the older you get (kids, mortgage, etc),
the harder it is to add grad school into the mix, I found that the
need for a grad degree became less relevant working on internal
teams. Now that I'm in the position of hiring, I can definitely tell
you that I'd far rather hire someone with lots of good real world
experience (who also makes a point of keeping up with the field
through papers, books, blogs, conferences, etc). Working as an
internal UXer (I've been at financial services, insurance, and
retail) demands a particular combination of skills that I don't
think is taught in most HCI/IX programs. An MBA with a focus on
design (which I think Northwestern has) might offer this, but then
you really have to start considering the cost benefit analysis of a
50K/yr MBA program like Kellogg.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from ixda.org (via iPhone)
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48436

24 Jan 2010 - 2:56pm
Chris Braunsdorf
2008

One other quick note on this - when considering the cost of a grad
program, it is potentially much more than the sticker price of the
degree (for which you can get student loans). Unless you're able to
find a good online program, you need to factor in the facts that you
will need to move if the program is not where you are located and
likely leave your full time job to attend grad school full time. I
live a few hours from Pittsburgh so I've looked at Carnegie
Mellon's HCI program in the past. But with two young children and a
mortgage, there's no way we could afford to move and absorb such a
loss of income.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from ixda.org (via iPhone)
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48436

24 Jan 2010 - 10:58pm
jet
2008

Jared wrote:
> - Carnegie Mellon offers a one year program in HCI

and it's "hella intense", as the kids would say. I took classes with
people doing the one-year HCI degree and the workload is pretty insane.
I have to wonder what you actually have time to reflect upon, as you're
always burning the candle at both ends trying to finish projects. CMU
is chock full of amazing resources, but it seems like the one-year HCI
students never have time to go to talks, browse the libraries, etc.

The two-year degree at CMU gives you a bit more room to work/think.
It's still hard as hell, but at least you have a chance to take an
elective or two and hang out or go to talks.

--
J. E. 'jet' Townsend, IDSA
Design, Fabrication, Hacking
design: www.allartburns.org; hacking: www.flatline.net; HF: KG6ZVQ
PGP: 0xD0D8C2E8 AC9B 0A23 C61A 1B4A 27C5 F799 A681 3C11 D0D8 C2E8

24 Jan 2010 - 11:05pm
Bonnie E. John
2008

As the former head of the Masters in HCI at Carnegie Mellon, I can
attest to the intensity, but I can remind folks that you don't HAVE to
do the program in one year! The classes are sequenced so you CAN do it
in a year, so it fits with some industry programs that sponsor their
employees to go away to school for a masters program for just a year.
And the one-year pace is great for folks who want to bite the
tuition-and-living-cost bullet for as short a time as possible.
But plenty of people have decided that they want a slower pace and it is
easy to take one or two less courses a semester and just take one extra
semester to finish up your electives. Other folks have worked locally
and taken two or more years to go through. One local person took about
six years. CMU is very flexible.
Bonnie

j. eric townsend wrote:
> Jared wrote:
>> - Carnegie Mellon offers a one year program in HCI
>
> and it's "hella intense", as the kids would say. I took classes with
> people doing the one-year HCI degree and the workload is pretty
> insane. I have to wonder what you actually have time to reflect upon,
> as you're always burning the candle at both ends trying to finish
> projects. CMU is chock full of amazing resources, but it seems like
> the one-year HCI students never have time to go to talks, browse the
> libraries, etc.
>
> The two-year degree at CMU gives you a bit more room to work/think.
> It's still hard as hell, but at least you have a chance to take an
> elective or two and hang out or go to talks.
>

19 Nov 2011 - 4:56pm
Josh Coe
2009

[redacted]

24 Jun 2010 - 6:01pm
Katie Gillespie
2009

I wanted to append to this thread --

I have recently been accepted into a one-year Masters (Master of Advanced Studies) Interaction Design program at SUPSI, a Swiss university in Lugano, Switzerland.  I'm excited about it --it seems very hands-on to help create a portfolio, is geared towards professionals changing tack in their careers, and is only a year long. I haven't read any discussion about the program here: I'd love to hear thoughts and opinions from actual interaction designers about it. Program information is here:
http://www.maind.supsi.ch/

Best,
Katie Gillespie

19 Nov 2011 - 7:05pm
tonyzeoli
2008

Hi Katie,
This program looks fantastic. I'm very interested in applying. Does the program require a GRE or other standardized test? Did you receive a partial scholarship?

Tony Zeoli, Founder
®
The New Social Music Guide
P.O. Box 597, Chapel Hill, NC 27510
✉  tonyzeoli@netmix.com
☎ 917.705.4700
Adviser to 8tracks.com, HipHopMuseum.org

Social:
Contact me: tonyzeoli djtonyz djtonyz anthonyzeoli
Feed: Tiesto Lands Billboard Cover and Headlines Electric Zoo

Tweets: @wired article Steven Levy, The Future of Music http://t.co/bjzsNNEy. subject: @spotify, @facebook, @seanparker Follow @netmix Reply Retweet   10:40 Oct-28

My recent favorite song: It's You, It's Me (More Vox Mix) by Kaskade via Pandora | ► listen



On Thu, Jun 24, 2010 at 8:13 PM, Katie Gillespie <katiegi2001@yahoo.com> wrote:

I wanted to append to this thread --

I have recently been accepted into a one-year Masters (Master of
Advanced Studies) Interaction Design program at SUPSI, a Swiss
university in Lugano, Switzerland.  I'm excited about it --it seems
very hands-on to help create a portfolio, is geared towards
professionals changing tack in their careers, and is only a year long.
I haven't read any discussion about the program here: I'd love to hear
thoughts and opinions from actual interaction designers about it.
Program information is here:
http://www.maind.supsi.ch/ [1]

Best,
Katie Gillespie

(((Please leav
19 Nov 2011 - 8:05pm
Maydina Zakiah
2010

Is there any scholarship for this program?

On Jun 25, 2010 6:50 AM, "Katie Gillespie" <katiegi2001@yahoo.com> wrote:

I wanted to append to this thread --

I have recently been accepted into a one-year Masters (Master of
Advanced Studies) Interaction Design program at SUPSI, a Swiss
university in Lugano, Switzerland.  I'm excited about it --it seems
very hands-on to help create a portfolio, is geared towards
professionals changing tack in their careers, and is only a year long.
I haven't read any discussion about the program here: I'd love to hear
thoughts and opinions from actual interaction designers about it.
Program information is here:
http://www.maind.supsi.ch/ [1]

Best,
Katie Gillespie

(
4 Nov 2010 - 5:58pm
SouSoulebarbu
2010

Hi,

So katie,

What do you think about this Master? And just a question, are the courses in English or in Italian?

Best,

SouSou

19 Nov 2011 - 7:05pm
tonyzeoli
2008

SouSou,
Go to the link and you'll find that the courses are taught in English. It's 1600 Swiss francs a semester or $1,725 US dollars. That's pretty short money for what looks like a pretty fantastic program. I'm assuming the SUPSI is subsidized by the Swiss government.
My girlfriend lived in Lugano. She said it's pretty expensive there.

Tony Zeoli, Founder
®
The New Social Music Guide
P.O. Box 597, Chapel Hill, NC 27510
✉  tonyzeoli@netmix.com
☎ 917.705.4700
Adviser to 8tracks.com, HipHopMuseum.org

Social:
Contact me: tonyzeoli djtonyz djtonyz anthonyzeoli
Feed: Tiesto Lands Billboard Cover and Headlines Electric Zoo

Tweets: @wired article Steven Levy, The Future of Music http://t.co/bjzsNNEy. subject: @spotify, @facebook, @seanparker Follow @netmix Reply Retweet   10:40 Oct-28

My recent favorite song: It's You, It's Me (More Vox Mix) by Kaskade via Pandora | ► listen



On Fri, Nov 5, 2010 at 8:08 AM, SouSoulebarbu <sousoublogfiles@free.fr> wrote:

Hi,

So katie,

What do you think about this Master? And just a question, are the courses in English or in Italian?

Best,

SouSou

(((Please lea
Syndicate content Get the feed