Driving users to register...

28 Jan 2010 - 10:43am
4 years ago
4 replies
447 reads
Marc B.
2010

Is there any general research or opinion out there when it comes to
driving users to register on a general information site?

For instance, is it better to "tease" content by offering one
recipe or advice column to give users a taste, and then to lock the
rest behind registration?

My concern is that 1) people won't register if they know they can
get the information for free on other sites 2) It feels like a cheap
ploy to offer content and then put up a barrier to accessing it 3)
the way to get users to register is to build trust and a sense of
value in a website

Comments

29 Jan 2010 - 8:54am
Graham Sear
2010

Hi Marc,

See my feedback below:

1) people won't register if they know they can get the information
for free on other sites.
If your website is offering the same content that's available for
free elsewhere chances are people won't register. It also means that
you, more than likely, wont end up as high on Google as people will be
less likely to link through to paid-for services.

As with most website unique, interesting content is what drives
people to visit and explore. A better service for registered users as
opposed to non-registered users is, for me a reason to register.

2) It feels like a cheap ploy to offer content and then put up a
barrier to accessing it.
Quite a few different media websites use a similar busines model to
get people to pay, New York Times, Business Week etc, where you
either get access to the first 4 articles for free then have to pay
or you are offered a short intro to the article and to view the
entire article requires registering/paying.

NYTimes paid for model
http://www.btobonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100120/MEDIABUSINESS/100129995/1001

3) the way to get users to register is to build trust and a sense of
value in a website
If you're giving people a better service, or access to unique
content for registering then you're more than likely to register.
Basically, for the user, what's the pay-off? I'm giving you my
details and what will I get in return. If you use IxDA as an example
you get to participate in online discussions with a well respected
peer group for registering your details.

I have a couple of questions:
1. Is the login to help build a sense of community for the website?
2. Are you collecting details just so you can market/spam to them?
3. What's the motivation for someone to register?

This research may help you
http://www.useit.com/alertbox/990711.html
http://www.usabilitynews.com/news/article2629.asp

Hope this helps

Graham Sear

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48799

29 Jan 2010 - 9:04am
Graham Sear
2010

Sorry ignore my last post, thought I would get some auto styling from
copying and pasting your previous comments. Here it is again but this
time with a slightly better visual hierachy...

Hi Marc,

See my feedback below:

1) people won't register if they know they can get the information
for free on other sites.

If your website is offering the same content that's available for
free elsewhere chances are people won't register. It also means that
you, more than likely, wont end up as high on Google as people will be
less likely to link through to paid-for services.

As with most website unique, interesting content is what drives
people to visit and explore. A better service for registered users as
opposed to non-registered users is, for me a reason to register.

2) It feels like a cheap ploy to offer content and then put up a
barrier to accessing it.

Quite a few different media websites use a similar busines model to
get people to pay, New York Times, Business Week etc, where you
either get access to the first 4 articles for free then have to pay
or you are offered a short intro to the article and to view the
entire article requires registering/paying.

NYTimes paid for model
http://www.btobonline.com/apps /pbcs.dll /article?AID= /20100120
/MEDIABUSINESS /100129995 /1001

3) the way to get users to register is to build trust and a sense of
value in a website.

If you're giving people a better service, or access to unique
content for registering then you're more than likely to register.
Basically, for the user, what's the pay-off? I'm giving you my
details and what will I get in return. If you use IxDA as an example
you get to participate in online discussions with a well respected
peer group for registering your details.

I have a couple of questions:

1. Is the login to help build a sense of community for the website?

2. Are you collecting details just so you can market/spam to them?

3. What's the motivation for someone to register?

This research may help you
http://www.useit.com/alertbox/990711.html
http://www.usabilitynews.com/news/article2629.asp

Hope this helps

Graham Sear

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48799

29 Jan 2010 - 5:25pm
Daniel Zollman
2009

Have you seen this presentation from Joshua Porter? It seems to be
aimed towards online software, but many of the same principles would
apply.
http://www.slideshare.net/bokardo/designing-for-sign-up

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48799

29 Jan 2010 - 10:44am
Marc B.
2010

Graham, thanks for the feedback and the links... to answer your
questions:

1. The login could build a sense of community, yes.
2. Yes, the details will be used for marketing purposes.
3. The motivation will be "premium" content, such as a customized
desktop widget.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48799

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