Future of IxD student???

31 Jan 2010 - 7:19am
4 years ago
8 replies
964 reads
Al Di
2008

Hi, I'm Studying IxD.
For this summer I'm looking for Internship around the world in
different companies in different field from Google and Microsoft to
small interactive art and media companies. I realized that the role
of interaction designers may differ very widely regarding the focus
of the companies.. form user interface designer to researcher and
finally to interactive artist. I'm really confused about the my own
future..because in order to get to any of these jobs(for future) one
must learn lots of different tools, approaches, methods.( please
correct me if I'm wrong). Now I have around 1.5 years of my Study in
front of me, I'm wondering what would be the role of an Interaction
designer in market and how can I use this 1.5 year to improve my
skills and what kind of skills would be required? and the most
important thing of all is that " what is the definition of
IxDesigner now and in 1.5 years?????

Comments

31 Jan 2010 - 7:42am
Dave Malouf
2005

I think you have a design problem. So the first thing you need to do
is reduce. You are aiming too broadly and looking for a simple answer
in an ever complex world.

First, what do you want to be when you grow up? I ask this to all my
students when they are asking me work related questions. Don't worry
about titles? Describe it in terms of activities. What do you like?
What excites you? What motivates you? This can be content, tools,
problem types, contexts, geography, political/social involvement,
etc.

Once you narrow that down, THEN you can ask, what skills do I need
other than generic design skills to conquer THAT role. Again, forget
titles and other semantics.

But the main thing is to not to aim yourself at everything at once.
you'll just end up being good for no one and end up settling. It's
the student with focus, passion and drive towards a bulls-eye that I
find does much better in early success.

oh! and learn to sketch. it never hurts to learn to sketch. ;-)

-- dave

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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31 Jan 2010 - 7:40am
Ali Mohamed
2010

Hi Ali,
I think the IxDesigner will get more responsibility to be a creator
not just adjusting usability. The more knowledge you have the more
opportunity you will get. Creativity will be more appreciated in this
profession and even more knowledge about globalization.

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31 Jan 2010 - 11:05am
Al Di
2008

Dear Dave...

Seeing my problem as design point of view will really help me a
lot...I'll Focus on that and I'll come back with more questions
soon....

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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31 Jan 2010 - 12:03pm
mattinteractive
2010

Ali,

I'd like to reinforce Dave's comments. I started my career in
interactive a little over 2 years ago (after undergrad). Since then
I've had the benefit of getting experience as an interactive
developer and designer. My philosophy was that if you get experience
in each of the different interactive disciplines, it will make you a
more dangerous professional in whichever discipline you choose to
become an expert -- and I was right.

However, you can't let that go on too long. You have to eventually
make a decision about which discipline you'd like to master.
Because, ultimately, it's the subject-matter experts that are the
most successful professionally.

So though I agree with Dave, I also think that during your studies
it's okay to explore all facets of interactive and gain a little
knowledge from each. It will help you make an informed decision about
what you really want to do.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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31 Jan 2010 - 12:51pm
Karl Nieberding
2010

On that note, any tips on a good resource to learn design sketching
from?

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31 Jan 2010 - 1:38pm
mattinteractive
2010

Hi Karl,

I just recently purchased this book: http://amzn.com/0123740371

Some really great tips for sketching UX!

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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31 Jan 2010 - 3:27pm
Dave Malouf
2005

This piece by our very own Will Evans (@semanticwill) is a tremendous
piece on the importance and value of sketching.
http://blog.semanticfoundry.com/2010/01/31/shades-of-gray-thoughts-on-sketching/

- dave

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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31 Jan 2010 - 4:39pm
jet
2008

Karl Nieberding wrote:
> On that note, any tips on a good resource to learn design sketching
> from?

Two answers:

1) Assuming you can't find a local class, I'd go with the Rapid Viz book.

2) Draw every day for 30-60 minutes. "Drawing tip of the day: It takes
about 1000 sketches to get pretty good at drawing...okay, go." -- Mark
Baskinger

--
J. E. 'jet' Townsend, IDSA
Design, Fabrication, Hacking
design: www.allartburns.org; hacking: www.flatline.net; HF: KG6ZVQ
PGP: 0xD0D8C2E8 AC9B 0A23 C61A 1B4A 27C5 F799 A681 3C11 D0D8 C2E8

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