Facebook on Google Buzz: How Well Does That Friendship Model Work?

10 Feb 2010 - 3:09pm
4 years ago
10 replies
1526 reads
Jarod Tang
2007

FYI

Sent to you by jtang via Google Reader: Facebook on Google Buzz: How
Well Does That Friendship Model Work? via ReadWriteWeb by Jolie O'Dell
on 2/9/10

While end users are eager to try out Google Buzz for themselves, many
of the Web's largest social properties have expressed a certain amount
of fear, uncertainty and doubt about the search giant's move into the
social space.

A Facebook rep said that the company is interested to see how Google's
latest product will make the Web more social and more open, but the
Facebook team has their concerns about whether Buzz's friendship model
is really all that functional. After a little bit of messing around
with the new product today, we can understand their point of view.

Sponsor

ReadWriteWeb's full coverage and analysis of Google Buzz:
"We're supportive of technologies that help make the web more social
and the world more open," a Facebook rep wrote to us today, "and we're
interested to see how Google Buzz progresses over time."

However, the Facebooker had words of warning about Buzz's hazy
friendship model.

To offer a brief explanation, Google has taken users' Gmail inboxes and
Google Talk IM contacts and programmatically tried to determine with
whom users communicate most frequently. Users can share Buzz posts with
the world (and Google search), or they can share privately through
their existing Gmail groups or custom-made groups in Buzz. For more
detail, take a look at this demo video:

Google Buzz seems to involve an asymmetric follower/friend model, but
we're not completely sure how friendships and shared posts will work.
As our Facebooker wrote, "The continued growth of the social web will
be determined by people and personal relationships. The people that you
email and chat with the most may not be your closest friends or the
people that you want to share and connect with."

We can definitely understand this point of view. Some folks rarely use
Gmail to communicate with their closest friends and family members
because they see them in person or use other networks to get in touch.
On the flip side of that coin, as more of us are using Gmail for work
communication, it might be irrelevant or overly personal to follow and
share with professional contacts.

All in all, one of our biggest concerns about Buzz adoption (being able
to play nicely with existing social apps) carries over into this part
of the conversation, as well: In addition to creating "best guesses"
for who to friend and follow using Gmail & Google Talk, why doesn't
Google simply use Twitter OAuth and Facebook Connect to import existing
friendships?

What do you think? Will Google Buzz's friendship model work? Or does
Facebook have a point about having carefully user-approved friendships
online?
Discuss

Things you can do from here:
- Subscribe to ReadWriteWeb using Google Reader
- Get started using Google Reader to easily keep up with all your
favorite sites

Comments

10 Feb 2010 - 3:11pm
SemanticWill
2007

Cross posting an article directly from a website is not really
encouraged behavior.

~ will

"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Will Evans | Director, Experience Design
tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
http://blog.semanticfoundry.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/semanticwill
aim: semanticwill
gtalk: semanticwill
twitter: semanticwill
skype: semanticwill
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

On Feb 10, 2010, at 3:09 PM, jtang wrote:

> FYI
>
> Sent to you by jtang via Google Reader: Facebook on Google Buzz: How
> Well Does That Friendship Model Work? via ReadWriteWeb by Jolie O'Dell
> on 2/9/10
>
> While end users are eager to try out Google Buzz for themselves, many
> of the Web's largest social properties have expressed a certain amount
> of fear, uncertainty and doubt about the search giant's move into the
> social space.
>
> A Facebook rep said that the company is interested to see how Google's
> latest product will make the Web more social and more open, but the
> Facebook team has their concerns about whether Buzz's friendship model
> is really all that functional. After a little bit of messing around
> with the new product today, we can understand their point of view.
>
> Sponsor
>
> ReadWriteWeb's full coverage and analysis of Google Buzz:
> "We're supportive of technologies that help make the web more social
> and the world more open," a Facebook rep wrote to us today, "and we're
> interested to see how Google Buzz progresses over time."
>
> However, the Facebooker had words of warning about Buzz's hazy
> friendship model.
>
> To offer a brief explanation, Google has taken users' Gmail inboxes
> and
> Google Talk IM contacts and programmatically tried to determine with
> whom users communicate most frequently. Users can share Buzz posts
> with
> the world (and Google search), or they can share privately through
> their existing Gmail groups or custom-made groups in Buzz. For more
> detail, take a look at this demo video:
>
>
>
> Google Buzz seems to involve an asymmetric follower/friend model, but
> we're not completely sure how friendships and shared posts will work.
> As our Facebooker wrote, "The continued growth of the social web will
> be determined by people and personal relationships. The people that
> you
> email and chat with the most may not be your closest friends or the
> people that you want to share and connect with."
>
> We can definitely understand this point of view. Some folks rarely use
> Gmail to communicate with their closest friends and family members
> because they see them in person or use other networks to get in touch.
> On the flip side of that coin, as more of us are using Gmail for work
> communication, it might be irrelevant or overly personal to follow and
> share with professional contacts.
>
> All in all, one of our biggest concerns about Buzz adoption (being
> able
> to play nicely with existing social apps) carries over into this part
> of the conversation, as well: In addition to creating "best guesses"
> for who to friend and follow using Gmail & Google Talk, why doesn't
> Google simply use Twitter OAuth and Facebook Connect to import
> existing
> friendships?
>
> What do you think? Will Google Buzz's friendship model work? Or does
> Facebook have a point about having carefully user-approved friendships
> online?
> Discuss
>
>
> Things you can do from here:
> - Subscribe to ReadWriteWeb using Google Reader
> - Get started using Google Reader to easily keep up with all your
> favorite sites
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

10 Feb 2010 - 3:24pm
Jarod Tang
2007

Hi Will,
Thanks for you kindly notice ( and sorry for the cross posting).

And, let's step further by asking a designer's questioin, Is "Cross posting
an article directly from a website" good for make life better or not?

Cheers,
Jarod

On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 9:11 PM, Will Evans <will at semanticfoundry.com>wrote:

>
> Cross posting an article directly from a website is not really encouraged
> behavior.
>
>
> ~ will
>
> "Where you innovate, how you innovate,
> and what you innovate are design problems"
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Will Evans | Director, Experience Design
> tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
> http://blog.semanticfoundry.com
> http://www.linkedin.com/in/semanticwill
> aim: semanticwill
> gtalk: semanticwill
> twitter: semanticwill
> skype: semanticwill
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> On Feb 10, 2010, at 3:09 PM, jtang wrote:
>
> FYI
>
> Sent to you by jtang via Google Reader: Facebook on Google Buzz: How
> Well Does That Friendship Model Work? via ReadWriteWeb by Jolie O'Dell
> on 2/9/10
>
> While end users are eager to try out Google Buzz for themselves, many
> of the Web's largest social properties have expressed a certain amount
> of fear, uncertainty and doubt about the search giant's move into the
> social space.
>
> A Facebook rep said that the company is interested to see how Google's
> latest product will make the Web more social and more open, but the
> Facebook team has their concerns about whether Buzz's friendship model
> is really all that functional. After a little bit of messing around
> with the new product today, we can understand their point of view.
>
> Sponsor
>
> ReadWriteWeb's full coverage and analysis of Google Buzz:
> "We're supportive of technologies that help make the web more social
> and the world more open," a Facebook rep wrote to us today, "and we're
> interested to see how Google Buzz progresses over time."
>
> However, the Facebooker had words of warning about Buzz's hazy
> friendship model.
>
> To offer a brief explanation, Google has taken users' Gmail inboxes and
> Google Talk IM contacts and programmatically tried to determine with
> whom users communicate most frequently. Users can share Buzz posts with
> the world (and Google search), or they can share privately through
> their existing Gmail groups or custom-made groups in Buzz. For more
> detail, take a look at this demo video:
>
>
>
> Google Buzz seems to involve an asymmetric follower/friend model, but
> we're not completely sure how friendships and shared posts will work.
> As our Facebooker wrote, "The continued growth of the social web will
> be determined by people and personal relationships. The people that you
> email and chat with the most may not be your closest friends or the
> people that you want to share and connect with."
>
> We can definitely understand this point of view. Some folks rarely use
> Gmail to communicate with their closest friends and family members
> because they see them in person or use other networks to get in touch.
> On the flip side of that coin, as more of us are using Gmail for work
> communication, it might be irrelevant or overly personal to follow and
> share with professional contacts.
>
> All in all, one of our biggest concerns about Buzz adoption (being able
> to play nicely with existing social apps) carries over into this part
> of the conversation, as well: In addition to creating "best guesses"
> for who to friend and follow using Gmail & Google Talk, why doesn't
> Google simply use Twitter OAuth and Facebook Connect to import existing
> friendships?
>
> What do you think? Will Google Buzz's friendship model work? Or does
> Facebook have a point about having carefully user-approved friendships
> online?
> Discuss
>
>
> Things you can do from here:
> - Subscribe to ReadWriteWeb using Google Reader
> - Get started using Google Reader to easily keep up with all your
> favorite sites
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>
>
>

--
@jarodtang
http://designforuse.blogspot.com/

10 Feb 2010 - 3:33pm
SemanticWill
2007

Jarod,

There are very good reasons why we don't encourage cross posting
entire articles from the web. We have over 10,000 members. There are
perhaps 100s of articles of interest to the IxD community posted every
day. Imagine getting thousands of articles clogging up you inbox
everyday. Snippets of articles with commentary and thoughtful
reflection are great, but simply cross posting articles from the web
would quickly get out of hand, clog our email servers, and ultimately
hurt our community. It's really for the best.

Cheers,

~ will

"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Will Evans | Director, Experience Design
tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
http://blog.semanticfoundry.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/semanticwill
aim: semanticwill
gtalk: semanticwill
twitter: semanticwill
skype: semanticwill
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

On Feb 10, 2010, at 3:24 PM, Jarod Tang wrote:

> Hi Will,
> Thanks for you kindly notice ( and sorry for the cross posting).
>
> And, let's step further by asking a designer's questioin, Is "Cross
> posting an article directly from a website" good for make life
> better or not?
>
> Cheers,
> Jarod
>
>
> On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 9:11 PM, Will Evans
> <will at semanticfoundry.com> wrote:
>
> Cross posting an article directly from a website is not really
> encouraged behavior.
>
>
> ~ will
>
> "Where you innovate, how you innovate,
> and what you innovate are design problems"
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Will Evans | Director, Experience Design
> tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
> http://blog.semanticfoundry.com
> http://www.linkedin.com/in/semanticwill
> aim: semanticwill
> gtalk: semanticwill
> twitter: semanticwill
> skype: semanticwill
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> On Feb 10, 2010, at 3:09 PM, jtang wrote:
>
>> FYI
>>
>> Sent to you by jtang via Google Reader: Facebook on Google Buzz: How
>> Well Does That Friendship Model Work? via ReadWriteWeb by Jolie
>> O'Dell
>> on 2/9/10
>>
>> While end users are eager to try out Google Buzz for themselves, many
>> of the Web's largest social properties have expressed a certain
>> amount
>> of fear, uncertainty and doubt about the search giant's move into the
>> social space.
>>
>> A Facebook rep said that the company is interested to see how
>> Google's
>> latest product will make the Web more social and more open, but the
>> Facebook team has their concerns about whether Buzz's friendship
>> model
>> is really all that functional. After a little bit of messing around
>> with the new product today, we can understand their point of view.
>>
>> Sponsor
>>
>> ReadWriteWeb's full coverage and analysis of Google Buzz:
>> "We're supportive of technologies that help make the web more social
>> and the world more open," a Facebook rep wrote to us today, "and
>> we're
>> interested to see how Google Buzz progresses over time."
>>
>> However, the Facebooker had words of warning about Buzz's hazy
>> friendship model.
>>
>> To offer a brief explanation, Google has taken users' Gmail inboxes
>> and
>> Google Talk IM contacts and programmatically tried to determine with
>> whom users communicate most frequently. Users can share Buzz posts
>> with
>> the world (and Google search), or they can share privately through
>> their existing Gmail groups or custom-made groups in Buzz. For more
>> detail, take a look at this demo video:
>>
>>
>>
>> Google Buzz seems to involve an asymmetric follower/friend model, but
>> we're not completely sure how friendships and shared posts will work.
>> As our Facebooker wrote, "The continued growth of the social web will
>> be determined by people and personal relationships. The people that
>> you
>> email and chat with the most may not be your closest friends or the
>> people that you want to share and connect with."
>>
>> We can definitely understand this point of view. Some folks rarely
>> use
>> Gmail to communicate with their closest friends and family members
>> because they see them in person or use other networks to get in
>> touch.
>> On the flip side of that coin, as more of us are using Gmail for work
>> communication, it might be irrelevant or overly personal to follow
>> and
>> share with professional contacts.
>>
>> All in all, one of our biggest concerns about Buzz adoption (being
>> able
>> to play nicely with existing social apps) carries over into this part
>> of the conversation, as well: In addition to creating "best guesses"
>> for who to friend and follow using Gmail & Google Talk, why doesn't
>> Google simply use Twitter OAuth and Facebook Connect to import
>> existing
>> friendships?
>>
>> What do you think? Will Google Buzz's friendship model work? Or does
>> Facebook have a point about having carefully user-approved
>> friendships
>> online?
>> Discuss
>>
>>
>> Things you can do from here:
>> - Subscribe to ReadWriteWeb using Google Reader
>> - Get started using Google Reader to easily keep up with all your
>> favorite sites
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>
>
>
>
> --
> @jarodtang
> http://designforuse.blogspot.com/

10 Feb 2010 - 3:56pm
Jarod Tang
2007

Got it, your main concern is on inspiration ( if it's too easy to cross
past, it's more risk a spam ), maybe Google reader's cross past could be
redesign accordingly (with some social enabling feature), :)

Br,
Jarod

On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 9:33 PM, Will Evans <will at semanticfoundry.com>wrote:

> Jarod,
>
> There are very good reasons why we don't encourage cross posting entire
> articles from the web. We have over 10,000 members. There are perhaps 100s
> of articles of interest to the IxD community posted every day. Imagine
> getting thousands of articles clogging up you inbox everyday. Snippets of
> articles with commentary and thoughtful reflection are great, but simply
> cross posting articles from the web would quickly get out of hand, clog our
> email servers, and ultimately hurt our community. It's really for the best.
>
> Cheers,
>
>
>
> ~ will
>
> "Where you innovate, how you innovate,
> and what you innovate are design problems"
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Will Evans | Director, Experience Design
> tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
> http://blog.semanticfoundry.com
> http://www.linkedin.com/in/semanticwill
> aim: semanticwill
> gtalk: semanticwill
> twitter: semanticwill
> skype: semanticwill
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> On Feb 10, 2010, at 3:24 PM, Jarod Tang wrote:
>
> Hi Will,
> Thanks for you kindly notice ( and sorry for the cross posting).
>
> And, let's step further by asking a designer's questioin, Is "Cross posting
> an article directly from a website" good for make life better or not?
>
> Cheers,
> Jarod
>
>
> On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 9:11 PM, Will Evans <will at semanticfoundry.com>wrote:
>
>>
>> Cross posting an article directly from a website is not really encouraged
>> behavior.
>>
>>
>> ~ will
>>
>> "Where you innovate, how you innovate,
>> and what you innovate are design problems"
>>
>>
>> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> Will Evans | Director, Experience Design
>> tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
>> http://blog.semanticfoundry.com
>> http://www.linkedin.com/in/semanticwill
>> aim: semanticwill
>> gtalk: semanticwill
>> twitter: semanticwill
>> skype: semanticwill
>>
>> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> On Feb 10, 2010, at 3:09 PM, jtang wrote:
>>
>> FYI
>>
>> Sent to you by jtang via Google Reader: Facebook on Google Buzz: How
>> Well Does That Friendship Model Work? via ReadWriteWeb by Jolie O'Dell
>> on 2/9/10
>>
>> While end users are eager to try out Google Buzz for themselves, many
>> of the Web's largest social properties have expressed a certain amount
>> of fear, uncertainty and doubt about the search giant's move into the
>> social space.
>>
>> A Facebook rep said that the company is interested to see how Google's
>> latest product will make the Web more social and more open, but the
>> Facebook team has their concerns about whether Buzz's friendship model
>> is really all that functional. After a little bit of messing around
>> with the new product today, we can understand their point of view.
>>
>> Sponsor
>>
>> ReadWriteWeb's full coverage and analysis of Google Buzz:
>> "We're supportive of technologies that help make the web more social
>> and the world more open," a Facebook rep wrote to us today, "and we're
>> interested to see how Google Buzz progresses over time."
>>
>> However, the Facebooker had words of warning about Buzz's hazy
>> friendship model.
>>
>> To offer a brief explanation, Google has taken users' Gmail inboxes and
>> Google Talk IM contacts and programmatically tried to determine with
>> whom users communicate most frequently. Users can share Buzz posts with
>> the world (and Google search), or they can share privately through
>> their existing Gmail groups or custom-made groups in Buzz. For more
>> detail, take a look at this demo video:
>>
>>
>>
>> Google Buzz seems to involve an asymmetric follower/friend model, but
>> we're not completely sure how friendships and shared posts will work.
>> As our Facebooker wrote, "The continued growth of the social web will
>> be determined by people and personal relationships. The people that you
>> email and chat with the most may not be your closest friends or the
>> people that you want to share and connect with."
>>
>> We can definitely understand this point of view. Some folks rarely use
>> Gmail to communicate with their closest friends and family members
>> because they see them in person or use other networks to get in touch.
>> On the flip side of that coin, as more of us are using Gmail for work
>> communication, it might be irrelevant or overly personal to follow and
>> share with professional contacts.
>>
>> All in all, one of our biggest concerns about Buzz adoption (being able
>> to play nicely with existing social apps) carries over into this part
>> of the conversation, as well: In addition to creating "best guesses"
>> for who to friend and follow using Gmail & Google Talk, why doesn't
>> Google simply use Twitter OAuth and Facebook Connect to import existing
>> friendships?
>>
>> What do you think? Will Google Buzz's friendship model work? Or does
>> Facebook have a point about having carefully user-approved friendships
>> online?
>> Discuss
>>
>>
>> Things you can do from here:
>> - Subscribe to ReadWriteWeb using Google Reader
>> - Get started using Google Reader to easily keep up with all your
>> favorite sites
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> @jarodtang
> http://designforuse.blogspot.com/
>
>
>

--
@jarodtang
http://designforuse.blogspot.com/

11 Feb 2010 - 9:42am
johnwromano
2008

As a long time Facebook and (intermittent) Twitter user, I was
completely frustrated by the lack of clear privacy settings and
explicit friendships. Their algorithm to determine my friendships was
far from accurate. And I have no idea what they will "recommend."

On the other hand, it's like having Pownce back! Images, videos and
links. Explicit commenting. Yea!

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=49241

11 Feb 2010 - 11:10am
Michael Micheletti
2006

Google increasingly gives me the creeps. Yes I am sending this from my Gmail
account, which is a widget in my iGoogle home page. And I am increasingly
wondering if having Gmail & iGoogle accounts is such a good idea. I really
don't want any other integrated cleverness from Google. They have become too
pervasive and inscrutable for me to completely trust now. Although
undoubtedly irrational on my part, my sense of unease is affecting
consideration of other Google initiatives which are probably completely
unconnected, like Android.

If any clever Google intelligences are monitoring, artificially or
otherwise, know that Buzz is the point at which you overstretched and went
too far for my comfort.

Michael Micheletti

On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 10:42 PM, John Romano <jromano at capstrat.com> wrote:

> As a long time Facebook and (intermittent) Twitter user, I was
> completely frustrated by the lack of clear privacy settings and
> explicit friendships. Their algorithm to determine my friendships was
> far from accurate. And I have no idea what they will "recommend."
>
> On the other hand, it's like having Pownce back! Images, videos and
> links. Explicit commenting. Yea!
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=49241
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
Michael Micheletti
michael.micheletti at gmail.com

11 Feb 2010 - 12:22pm
Jarod Tang
2007

> If any clever Google intelligences are monitoring, artificially or
> otherwise, know that Buzz is the point at which you overstretched and went
> too far for my comfort.
>
> yup, share the same feeling

--
@jarodtang
http://designforuse.blogspot.com/

11 Feb 2010 - 12:31pm
Sharon Greenfield5
2008

Oh please, you guys!
Buzz is just Facebook but with your Gmail connections.
Buzz is Facebook mobile - and these two companies are going to be
fighting it out for top Social Network.

My prediction is this: when the masses start invading and annoying
Facebook, the digitally savvy will move over to Google Buzz. And then
Buzz will have a certain sector to polish the concept and features. By
the time the mainstream gets over to Buzz, there will be a cultural
standard that will be followed, and mainstream people won't be
bitching about changes since there won't be many more as Buzz will
have already perfected most features.

Mark it: I said it.

On Feb 11, 2010, at 9:22 AM, Jarod Tang wrote:

>> If any clever Google intelligences are monitoring, artificially or
>> otherwise, know that Buzz is the point at which you overstretched
>> and went
>> too far for my comfort.
>>
>> yup, share the same feeling
>
> --
> @jarodtang
>

11 Feb 2010 - 1:45pm
jet
2008

Michael Micheletti wrote:
> Google increasingly gives me the creeps. Yes I am sending this from my Gmail
> account, which is a widget in my iGoogle home page. And I am increasingly
> wondering if having Gmail & iGoogle accounts is such a good idea. I really
> don't want any other integrated cleverness from Google. They have become too
> pervasive and inscrutable for me to completely trust now. Although
> undoubtedly irrational on my part

Speaking as someone with rather extensive experience in the privacy and
security arena, I don't think it's irrational at all. I have an
Android G1 and I set up a special account for calendar/address book
syncing. I really don't want all of my business information tied to my
browsing history, my purchasing history, and my personal life in general.

--
J. E. 'jet' Townsend, IDSA
Design, Fabrication, Hacking
design: www.allartburns.org; hacking: www.flatline.net; HF: KG6ZVQ
PGP: 0xD0D8C2E8 AC9B 0A23 C61A 1B4A 27C5 F799 A681 3C11 D0D8 C2E8

11 Feb 2010 - 3:51pm
James Goudy
2009

>From a brand perspective alone, all features aside, I think Facebook
is a better name, and lends a more traditional and substantial aspect
to the social network, linking subtly to scrapbook, notebook,
real-life media. Whereas Buzz sounds (to me) more like transient
fluff, noise on the wind. Ultimately I think this brand identity
will also play a role, along with the wariness people are feeling
after finally getting re-friended up after the myspace/friendster
migration. Facebook will be in the mix, at least for a few years,
and won't go away until it is absorbed. People don't want to
migrate again any time soon, so challengers will be forced to come to
them. My prediction anyway.

James

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=49241

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