Looking for feedback on a functional banner that is always there and pinned to bottom of the browser - not context driven.

16 Feb 2010 - 9:53am
4 years ago
4 replies
969 reads
Peter Becker
2010

Does anyone have any experience with an "always there" functional
banner that is pinned to the bottom of the browser? An example of
this is at http://www.houselogic.com/

It seems of little use to me as it is redundant to
information/function that is already on the site, takes up real
estate and is more a distraction than anything else. Maybe with some
additional context driven function there might be something there,
but the CEO here liked it so I'm doing my due diligence. I can't
remember seeing anything like it before.

Thanks -

Comments

16 Feb 2010 - 12:25pm
Gail Swanson
2008

I'm seeing these with increasing frequency in the footers and
headers. I think Facebook started the trend. I think the banner
blindness research still holds true here.

A really good example I've used in the past to talk people out of
implementing such functionality are the header messages that show up
in Internet Explorer. You keep wondering why the page won't load
right, and just when you've reached your frustration threshold, you
see that there is a message asking if you want to install an active x
control.

These things aren't very visible and usually indicate functionality
that should be integrated in a different fashion.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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17 Feb 2010 - 12:34pm
Gil Pinheiro
2010

Generally, I am not a fan, but stackoverflow does something a little
different:

* They treat it as an alert
* They let the user dismiss it

It is, as you said, a visual distraction - but they use that property
to intentionally gain the user's attention.

http://stackoverflow.com/

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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22 Feb 2010 - 8:06am
Maria Cordell
2010

Crate and Barrel (http://www.crateandbarrel.com/) does this as well.
As a consumer, I think it works well in a shopping context, and it
doesn't get in my way. I like the way they've implemented it, and it
feels elegant, but then again, I haven't bought anything that online
at C&B; when I shop there it's always in store.

As a designer I have to wonder how many online shoppers get it, but it
seems the C&B design is doing a reasonable job of providing cues for
what's happening when an item gets added to the cart, and they're
showing item thumbnails for what's been added. Would be interesting to
know if/how they tested the design.

Maria

On Tue, Feb 16, 2010 at 1:53 AM, Peter Becker <peterbsemail at gmail.com> wrote:
> Does anyone have any experience with an "always there" functional
> banner that is pinned to the bottom of the browser? An example of
> this is at http://www.houselogic.com/
>
> It seems of little use to me as it is redundant to
> information/function that is already on the site, takes up real
> estate and is more a distraction than anything else. Maybe with some
> additional context driven function there might be something there,
> but the CEO here liked it so I'm doing my due diligence. I can't
> remember seeing anything like it before.
>
> Thanks -
> ________________________________________________________________
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--
Maria Cordell
mcordell at gmail.com

23 Feb 2010 - 4:25pm
Oleh Kovalchuke
2006

You are right, the bottom of computer screen is invisible. I think that is
the reason why Facebook has relocated that functionality to the left nav (I
do use Facebook).

The Crate and Barrel example (http://www.crateandbarrel.com/) is interesting
and might work. It's bigger and changes based on customer input. I wonder
how does it test with the real people going about their busy-buying
business.

--
Oleh Kovalchuke
(816) 808-6177
Skype: tangospring

On Tue, Feb 16, 2010 at 3:25 AM, gail swanson <gail_swanson at sbcglobal.net>wrote:

> I'm seeing these with increasing frequency in the footers and
> headers. I think Facebook started the trend. I think the banner
> blindness research still holds true here.
>
> A really good example I've used in the past to talk people out of
> implementing such functionality are the header messages that show up
> in Internet Explorer. You keep wondering why the page won't load
> right, and just when you've reached your frustration threshold, you
> see that there is a message asking if you want to install an active x
> control.
>
> These things aren't very visible and usually indicate functionality
> that should be integrated in a different fashion.
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=49414
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

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