MadLib form increases conversion

25 Feb 2010 - 1:08pm
4 years ago
14 replies
1609 reads
Peter Becker
2010

I loved this and that it produced the results it did was really cool.
I'm an orderly kinda guy and give me good clean lines, designs and
forms any day of the week.....but I loved the conversational and
informal feel that this provides.
In short, my eye hated it, but my heart welcomed it - the results
seems to bear out who wins in that match up.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=49660

Comments

25 Feb 2010 - 2:42pm
Oleh Kovalchuke
2006

Conversation vs. barking orders.
Two thumbs up.

--
Oleh Kovalchuke
(816) 808-6177
Skype: tangospring

On Thu, Feb 25, 2010 at 11:35 AM, Brandon E.B. Ward <brandonebward at gmail.com
> wrote:

> I thought this was an interesting (i.e. more fun) take on the traditional
> web form. I also find it compelling that using the MadLib format increased
> conversion by quite a bit.
>
> http://www.lukew.com/ff/entry.asp?1007
>
> B
>

25 Feb 2010 - 2:44pm
Stephen Collins
2009

On Thu, Feb 25, 2010 at 8:35 PM, Brandon E.B.Ward
<brandonebward at gmail.com> wrote:
> I thought this was an interesting (i.e. more fun) take on the traditional
> web form. I also find it compelling that using the MadLib format increased
> conversion by quite a bit.

I'm about to begin redesign for an online version of a large and
complex form for a government department here in Australia. I have
litle to zero chance of using this approach (and it might not work for
the form, anyway), but I wonder how much of the overall *idea and
feel* I can sneak in?

Maybe in some A/B... :)

Clever work!

Steve
--
Stephen Collins
trib at acidlabs.org | +61 410 680722 | @trib

acidlabs | Conversation. Collaboration. Community. | www.acidlabs.org

This email is: [ ] bloggable [X] ask first [ ] private

25 Feb 2010 - 5:16pm
jonesabi
2006

What's funny is that this is a lot like 'Cloze' activities I used when I taught 3rd grade: http://www.learnnc.org/reference/cloze activity

9 Jul 2010 - 3:25pm
susandoran
2010

I also appreciate it for its literal/actual implementation. And, as Stephen
says, for its idea and feel--it's engaging, respectful, low-key, and
evocative of play!

It's also gently, radical, which I *love*. It is completely user-centric
rather than "corporate data collection"-centric.

I'm thrilled in addition to be all the above: it's effective.

NICE work!

Susan

note: if this posts to the IxDA list I'm very sorry! I meant only to edit this post not send to the list but there does not seem to be an option solely to edit not edit & post.

26 Feb 2010 - 6:08am
Dave Weinberg
2010

love it in that it bridges data (collection) with story and context
(with a potential dash of surveyMonkey)- and YOU are the main
character so naturally you get drawn in. Not sure it would work for
all types of DC but things that involve some kind of service or a way
to personalize the mundane with humor. good stuff!

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=49660

28 Feb 2010 - 3:46am
Harry Brignull
2004
1 Mar 2010 - 4:14am
Thomas Petersen
2008

There are several issues with this test.

Just to name one

On the "before" form address doesn't appear to be optional. It is on the "after" form and then the increase is obvious and the "before" form exeptionally badly done.

1 Mar 2010 - 11:20am
Ariel Leroux
2009

I wasn't exactly sure what you guys were talking about so I did a little research and am finding quite the level of information.

At first sighting, I seriously saw huge benefits with the, "Geez, why haven't we been doing this already?" feeling, but then it hit me - the over-use alongside the mis-use could make this go from "very cool" to "Am I filling out a form at a lawyer office?"  In addition to this potential, I also feel that there are severe ways to - not - implement something of this nature.

The 4th or 5th site I came across which was talking about the application of this, shows the perfect example of how to NOT implement a change like this.

http://www.kalzumeus.com/2010/02/27/lesson-from-madlibs-signup-fad-do-your-own-tests/

Had he changed the general layout itself to allow for this design change I think he'd have seen different results than he did, but instead, his mode of implementation just made everything cluttered and took away from the white space which clearly outlined the signup information.  He likely confused his users as well as made them feel stupid because they couldn't differentiate between one area and another.

Poor test imo.

I fear too many trying to take up this "new" method, and just killing its shiny by implementing it with poor design insight.

26 Mar 2010 - 3:01pm
susandoran
2010

I took it as a given that no one would run forward implementing Mad Libs without thoughtful consideration of their own users, business goals, and context.  That naturally we'd be doing the necessary research and testing legwork, cuz...that's what we do.

  The result of seeing design innovation like this, for me, isn't to copy literally, but about being inspired, reflecting on what underlying design, interaction, and engagement principles might make this successful in other contexts.

On Mon, Mar 1, 2010 at 3:50 PM, Ariel Leroux <contact@ixda.org> wrote:

I wasn't exactly sure what you guys were talking about so I did a little research and am finding quite the level of information.

At first sighting, I seriously saw huge benefits with the, "Geez, why haven't we been doing this already?" feeling, but then it hit me - the over-use alongside the mis-use could make this go from "very cool" to "Am I filling out a form at a lawyer office?"  In addition to this potential, I also feel that there are severe ways to - not - implement something of this nature.

The 4th or 5th site I came across which was talking about the application of this, shows the perfect example of how to NOT implement a change like this.

http://www.kalzumeus.com/2010/02/27/lesson-from-madlibs-signup-fad-do-your-own-tests/ [1]

Had he changed the general layout itself to allow for this design change I think he'd have seen different results than he did, but instead, his mode of implementation just made everything cluttered and took away from the white space which clearly outlined the signup information.  He likely confused his users as well as made them feel stupid because they couldn't differentiate between one area and another.

Poor test imo.

I fear too many trying to take up this "new" method, and just killing its shiny by implementing it with poor design insight.

(((Please
1 Mar 2010 - 11:40pm
Audrey Crane
2009

I'm sold, but playing devil's advocate, and thinking about the boundaries of this:

  • We know people don't read, but clearly they have to read this. What's so interesting they're willing to read? Is it because that disinclination is offset by the value of understanding where my info is going / what's happening with it? Or is it the novelty?
  • Does that imply that this is more successful with non-standard forms where I am not sure what's happening, and just annoying with, say, a standard registration form?
  • More difficult for people who are ESL?
  • Harder to understand what it is at a glance?
  • It seems like there are also limits to the length of a form, or number of forms (e.g. several page signup) that you could do this successfully with?

 

2 Mar 2010 - 12:38pm
susandoran
2010

I sent this via email soon after Ariel's yesterday's post but it didn't seem to "take." Not that it's profound or anything, but I am going to try submitting it directly via ixda.org

..............................

I took it as a given that no one would run forward implementing Mad Libs without thoughtful consideration of their own users, business goals, and context.  That naturally we'd be doing the necessary research and testing legwork, cuz...that's what we do.
 

The result of seeing design innovation like this, for me, isn't to copy literally, but about being inspired, reflecting on what underlying design, interaction, and engagement principles might make this successful in other contexts.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Susan Doran
Portland, Maine

/susandoran  (facebook)
@susandoran (twitter)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

26 Mar 2010 - 3:01pm
Jamie Cain
2009

Who is this and how did you get my email????

Stop emailing me.

-----Original Message----- From: ixdaor@host.ixda.org [mailto:ixdaor@host.ixda.org] On Behalf Of Susan Doran Sent: Tuesday, March 02, 2010 3:02 PM To: Jamie Cain Subject: Re: [IxDA] MadLib form increases conversion

I sent this via email soon after Ariel's yesterday's post but it didn't seem
to "take." Not that it's profound or anything, but I am going to try
submitting it directly via ixda.org

..............................

I took it as a given that no one would run forward implementing Mad Libs without thoughtful consideration of their own users, business goals, and context.  That naturally we'd be doing the necessary research and testing legwork, cuz...that's what we do.   The result of seeing design innovation like this, for me, isn't to copy literally, but about being inspired, reflecting on what underlying design, interaction, and engagement principles might make this successful in other contexts.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Susan DoranPortland, Maine/susandoran
 (facebook)@susandoran (twitter) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

(((Plea

26 Mar 2010 - 3:01pm
Daniel Barnett
2009

Does anyone realize that non-internal people are receiving tons of
emails about this launch?? Are you testing something? Because I've
literally received like 50 emails over the last 3 days...

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 2, 2010, at 3:03 PM, Susan Doran wrote:

> I sent this via email soon after Ariel's yesterday's post but it
> didn't seem to "take." Not that it's profound or anything, but I am
> going to try submitting it directly via ixda.org > > .............................. > > I took it as a given that no one would run forward implementing > Mad Libs without thoughtful consideration of their own users, business > goals, and context. That naturally we'd be doing the necessary > research and testing legwork, cuz...that's what we do. > The result of seeing design innovation like this, for me, isn't to > copy literally, but about being inspired, reflecting on what
> underlying > design, interaction, and engagement principles might make this > successful in other contexts. > > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Susan DoranPortland, Maine/susandoran
> (facebook)@susandoran (twitter) > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ > >

2 Mar 2010 - 11:24pm
Charles Boyung
2009

The big thing to consider here is that the new version changes SEVERAL items, not just the layout. He essentially removed the big, ugly comment box and also changed the phone number field from a really annoying group of 3 text boxes to a nice, simple single text box. These are not the only changes, either, but I think that those two changes alone would increase conversion rates. A true test of the success of this form would be to go back to the old style, but keep the same set of fields and functionality as the new form. Then compare the results of that with the mad-libs form. That is the only way that you could (semi-)accurately determine if the mad-libs form increases conversions or if it is just the fact that the fields on the form are now more user-friendly as-is.

I like the mad-libs idea, but I really think that it is very flawed to say that switching to this style did ANYTHING in increasing conversion rates because there really is no proof of that.

Syndicate content Get the feed