Fwd: Google does it again - with maps

8 Feb 2005 - 2:52pm
9 years ago
3 replies
733 reads
Noah Mittman
2005

(Rather surprised that the list address isn't in the reply-to, but oh well...)

---------- Forwarded message ----------
For kicks, I decided to "fly" west from my home in Brooklyn (start at
decent height above street level and hold down the left arrow), but by
the time I got bored I hadn't even made it out of New Jersey.

The only thing missing was an Indiana Jones-themed airplane icon in the middle.

Was the most literal sense of distance I'd gotten from a map system
ever, however. Scale legends are requisites, but for a pure visceral
effect nothing beats time. If there's a command (more like an easter egg) for
auto-scrolling along a direction route path, I'd love to see it.

On Tue, 8 Feb 2005 10:54:08 -0500, Steve Mulder <smulder at molecular.com> wrote:
> Click-and-drag panning is addictive.

--
Noah Mittman
http://www.teradome.com

Comments

8 Feb 2005 - 4:04pm
Joan Linskey
2003

Impressive.

I especially like the pizza search example.

My Furniture Store search returned all the major furniture stores near my home along with links to thier web sites... Cool! I think Google got it right.

It's impressive that this is all javascript DHTML. Even though it has a few javascript errors here and there, it performs really well on the client.

Joan Linskey

---------------------------------
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Search presents - Jib Jab's 'Second Term'

8 Feb 2005 - 4:41pm
subimage interactive
2004

In response to the "Why DHTML?" questions I ask you...Why not? It's
pretty common knowledge that Google is working on their own browser
based on FireFox. What's to stop them from making a version of
GBrowser for PDA's and leveraging their existing applications to use
it? (besides screen real estate of course)

Regardless, very cool use of DHTML. They're really working the
XMLHTTPRequest object. :)

8 Feb 2005 - 7:27pm
Manu Sharma
2003

Joan:
"It's impressive that this is all javascript DHTML. Even though it has
a few javascript errors here and there, it performs really well on the
client."

Yes, very impressive indeed. There's an Indian map site that does the
same although the quality/ accuracy/ detail of maps is far from Google
or Mapquest versions. The design of the site is led by a Stanford
sophomore.

http://mapmyindia.com [search for Juhu, Mumbai, Maharastra]

Manu.

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