Survey: can engineers play the same role as designers

5 Mar 2005 - 8:58pm
9 years ago
6 replies
646 reads
sandeepblues
2003

Do you believe that it is better to have separate
positions for UI design vs. UI engineering
(implementation) ? Suppose that the same person had
the time to collect all the user data, define the
design, create prototypes, conduct user studies and
then code the project.

I am currently UI engineer, and I used to be a UI
designer. I don't think the 2 can be melded.

Your opinions and why?

Thanks.

Sandeep

Comments

5 Mar 2005 - 9:04pm
dszuc
2005

Hi Sandeep:

Yes think so, as long as you as a UI designer can remove yourself from being
too close to your own design. This is especially important during Usability
Testing when you are in opening up your work for review.

I think it's a healthy position to be in, as it allows you to see/feel what
Product Designers and Developers feel when Usability folk test/review their
design work.

Daniel Szuc
Principal Usability Consultant
Apogee Usability Asia Ltd
www.apogeehk.com
'Usability in Asia'

-----Original Message-----
[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]

Do you believe that it is better to have separate
positions for UI design vs. UI engineering
(implementation) ? Suppose that the same person had
the time to collect all the user data, define the
design, create prototypes, conduct user studies and
then code the project.

I am currently UI engineer, and I used to be a UI
designer. I don't think the 2 can be melded.

Your opinions and why?

Thanks.

Sandeep
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6 Mar 2005 - 2:21am
Sachendra
2005

I was a UI Engineer and now I'm a UI Designer. I think its better to
have seperate positions because once you get down to designing
architecture and coding, performance of software and deadlines take
preference and "whats good for the user" takes a back seat.

On Sat, 5 Mar 2005 17:58:58 -0800 (PST), Sandeep Jain
<sandeepblues at yahoo.com> wrote:
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
> Do you believe that it is better to have separate
> positions for UI design vs. UI engineering
> (implementation) ? Suppose that the same person had
> the time to collect all the user data, define the
> design, create prototypes, conduct user studies and
> then code the project.
>
> I am currently UI engineer, and I used to be a UI
> designer. I don't think the 2 can be melded.
>
> Your opinions and why?
>
> Thanks.
>
> Sandeep
> _______________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixdg.org
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixdg.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixdg.org
> Home ....................... http://ixdg.org/
>

--
Sachendra Yadav
9886376231

6 Mar 2005 - 12:25pm
Abhishek Thakkar
2004

Ahem ..
Can you people define these roles more clearly... ?

-Thakkar
Engineer turning Designer and a Terminology N00b

On Sun, 6 Mar 2005 12:51:21 +0530, Sachendra Yadav <sachendra at gmail.com> wrote:
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
> I was a UI Engineer and now I'm a UI Designer. I think its better to
> have seperate positions because once you get down to designing
> architecture and coding, performance of software and deadlines take
> preference and "whats good for the user" takes a back seat.
>
> On Sat, 5 Mar 2005 17:58:58 -0800 (PST), Sandeep Jain
> <sandeepblues at yahoo.com> wrote:
> > [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
> >
> > Do you believe that it is better to have separate
> > positions for UI design vs. UI engineering
> > (implementation) ? Suppose that the same person had
> > the time to collect all the user data, define the
> > design, create prototypes, conduct user studies and
> > then code the project.
> >
> > I am currently UI engineer, and I used to be a UI
> > designer. I don't think the 2 can be melded.
> >
> > Your opinions and why?
> >
> > Thanks.
> >
> > Sandeep
> > _______________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixdg.org
> > (Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixdg.org/
> > Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
> > Questions .................. lists at ixdg.org
> > Home ....................... http://ixdg.org/
> >
>
> --
> Sachendra Yadav
> 9886376231
> _______________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixdg.org
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixdg.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixdg.org
> Home ....................... http://ixdg.org/
>

--
Abhishek Thakkar
The Last of the Giants

7 Mar 2005 - 6:39am
Damian Nepomnaschy
2004

I studied graphic design, HCI and I'm ending now a MSc in Software
Engineering course.

I'm not sure if an engineer can play the same role as a designer, it
depends on a lot of factors.
But people with skills in visual design and software design
(implementation), are very useful for any UI development team.
Why?
- Communication between customers, engineering and design areas, can be
improved.
- Requirements are enriched because different point of view are analyzed.
- It's easier to "sell" user-centered design and usability, within the
team and between areas.
- It's a good background for leading a team.

Damian Nepomnaschy
PS> I think both areas are somehow melded in the HCI field.

Sandeep Jain wrote:
>Do you believe that it is better to have separate
>positions for UI design vs. UI engineering
>(implementation) ? Suppose that the same person had
>the time to collect all the user data, define the
>design, create prototypes, conduct user studies and
>then code the project.
>
>I am currently UI engineer, and I used to be a UI
>designer. I don't think the 2 can be melded.
>
>Your opinions and why?
>
>Thanks.
>
>Sandeep

7 Mar 2005 - 6:27am
sandeepblues
2003

UI engineer writes code that implements a UI design.

UI designer does not write code. His/her deliverable
is a UI spec. based on user studies and prototyping.

Sandeep

--- Abhishek Thakkar <thakkar at gmail.com> wrote:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only
> relevant quoted material.]
>
> Ahem ..
> Can you people define these roles more clearly... ?
>
> -Thakkar
> Engineer turning Designer and a Terminology N00b
>
>

7 Mar 2005 - 10:40am
John Vaughan - ...
2004

Here's my (simplistic) opinion:

For the original presentation, plus other blather, go to
http://www.jcvtcs.com/_understanding/understanding.html
and Click on "Is it an Art or a Science?"

[CONTENT >> ]

The Customer Experience practice already embraces a broad umbrella of activity: graphics, navigation & structure, behavior, online help and personalization. Within all that, there are also two major approaches to usability.

The Interaction Designer
is a Creative person
with Proactive approach
who Innovates
in a Studio environment
making Prototypes & Models
is good at Proposing Solutions
through Skill & Talent

The Interaction Designer delivers immediate solutions. Many development teams look to them as a "short cut" to market.

The Usability Engineer
is an Academic person
with Analytical approach
who Evaluates
in a Laboratory environment
making Tests & Reports
is good at Identifying Issues
through Rigor & Methodology

The Usability Engineer is more likely to identify customer needs, data and behavior that have somehow been missed

With appropriate backgound information the Interaction Designer can look at a site and come up with a fair number of viable design improvements quickly. Often that's all the client wants.

But there are also strong arguments for Usability Analysis. We now expect our sites to handle a more intimate relationship with the customer. We have the tools to harvest the customer behavior, organize the business information and deliver personalization.

The Usability Engineer should be able to identify things you've missed. But you'll probably still need an Interaction Designer to come up with creative solutions.

Most production environments lump the two schools of effort together, even though they are actually very different. You rarely see this sort of rigorous separation of responsibilities. The "usability expert" is often expected to wear both hats, providing neutral analysis and creative advocacy. Sometimes that can get a little confusing.

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