Nice integration of HW and SW

23 Jan 2004 - 2:51pm
10 years ago
10 replies
612 reads
Josh Seiden
2003

Thought you all might enjoy this...

http://www.designiris.com/graphiclink/

Comments

23 Jan 2004 - 2:57pm
Dave Malouf
2005

<<http://www.designiris.com/graphiclink/>>

Is that really patentable? It's a neat concept, but I wonder if it is really
defendable. I guess if adobe could patent tabbed palettes then this is
patentable, eh?

I like the designs and I like the presentation.

Time to get those creative off hours juices churning, eh?

-- dave

23 Jan 2004 - 5:22pm
IdoShavit
2004

Nice idea and nice presentation, but a bit immature, and not really "nice
integration" (MHO). Clearly shows that decent interaction design is much
more than nice graphical innovations.

I would also argue that these ideas, as much as they are eye-candies, do not
solve any real world problems. (Though I do see the "coolness factor", and
appreciate the effect of "coolness" on sales and marketing and to an extent,
on user experience).

1. The "Watch" idea: Very innovative, but is it applicable? Users would have
to wear the watch loose enough to slide it up and down. Even worse, you
would need to rotate both your arms to some very uncomfortable angles to
work with this interface.

2. MP3 players: one of the bigger pains in the current trend of MP3 players
is the lack of screen real-estate. I can not see how the design presented
here addresses this problem. On the contrary, this would waste valuable
space for visual gimmickry.

3. The Washing Machine: too many (contradicting) "indicators", wrong
selector design.
A. The blue dot on the 'rotary selector' - points always to the 60 degree
mark. At the minimum, the blue dot should be removed.
Actually, the whole idea of this rotary design was to enable the user to
apply enough force to change the mechanical washer settings. This is no
longer the case. The settings are electronically controlled, and you can
provide other, gentler and more precise means of selection.
B. There is a small notch as part of the temperature dial which points to
the selected temperature. However, it is much less prominent than the left
pointing triangle with the word TEMP at the bottom of the LCD screen, next
to the control buttons, which points to a different temperature on the dial.
This design will no doubt cause confusion.
C. Is the temperature dial physical? I believe not, as it changes according
to the mode. Why list the options in a rotating fashion on the dial? Isn't
it better to display the options in a way it will be easy to read? Why not
limit the display in the dial to a single (current) option?

I could go on and on. My point is: this is absolutely not a good example of
"Nice integration of HW and SW".

BTW
The Washing Machine example is a good starting point to a class discussion
about the role of legacy in (tangible) interface design, and about whether
and when older (tangible) interaction conventions should be broken.

Ido

-----Original Message-----

From: Joshua Seiden [mailto:josh at 36partners.com]
Sent: Friday, January 23, 2004 11:51 AM
To: discuss at interactiondesigners.com
Subject: [ID Discuss] Nice integration of HW and SW

Thought you all might enjoy this...

http://www.designiris.com/graphiclink/

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24 Jan 2004 - 10:20pm
Erik Harrison
2004

Actually, I think that it's a fabulous integration of HW and SW. The overall demo
is better than the terrible applications that demonstrate.

Really, what I see is that Interaction Design or whatever we call it this week has
two prongs which don't always get along, which is the physical design, and the
cognitive design. In portable devices, who hasn't turned the scroll wheel the wrong
way? This design makes it really easy to link the physical interface to the
virtual interface cognitively, but then you have problems with the physical effects
of the design - cognitively its simple enough, but turning your arm that way is
not.

For example, a washing machine as a legacy interface - but I've learned on the
legacy interface. The cognitive burden of learning a new interface may be greater
than the physical inconvinience of the design.

-Erik

--- "Shavit, Ido" <IShavit at athoc.com> wrote:
Nice idea and nice presentation, but a bit immature, and not really "nice
integration" (MHO). Clearly shows that decent interaction design is much
more than nice graphical innovations.

I would also argue that these ideas, as much as they are eye-candies, do not
solve any real world problems. (Though I do see the "coolness factor", and
appreciate the effect of "coolness" on sales and marketing and to an extent,
on user experience).

1. The "Watch" idea: Very innovative, but is it applicable? Users would have
to wear the watch loose enough to slide it up and down. Even worse, you
would need to rotate both your arms to some very uncomfortable angles to
work with this interface.

2. MP3 players: one of the bigger pains in the current trend of MP3 players
is the lack of screen real-estate. I can not see how the design presented
here addresses this problem. On the contrary, this would waste valuable
space for visual gimmickry.

3. The Washing Machine: too many (contradicting) "indicators", wrong
selector design.
A. The blue dot on the 'rotary selector' - points always to the 60 degree
mark. At the minimum, the blue dot should be removed.
Actually, the whole idea of this rotary design was to enable the user to
apply enough force to change the mechanical washer settings. This is no
longer the case. The settings are electronically controlled, and you can
provide other, gentler and more precise means of selection.
B. There is a small notch as part of the temperature dial which points to
the selected temperature. However, it is much less prominent than the left
pointing triangle with the word TEMP at the bottom of the LCD screen, next
to the control buttons, which points to a different temperature on the dial.
This design will no doubt cause confusion.
C. Is the temperature dial physical? I believe not, as it changes according
to the mode. Why list the options in a rotating fashion on the dial? Isn't
it better to display the options in a way it will be easy to read? Why not
limit the display in the dial to a single (current) option?

I could go on and on. My point is: this is absolutely not a good example of
"Nice integration of HW and SW".

BTW
The Washing Machine example is a good starting point to a class discussion
about the role of legacy in (tangible) interface design, and about whether
and when older (tangible) interaction conventions should be broken.

Ido

-----Original Message-----

From: Joshua Seiden [mailto:josh at 36partners.com]
Sent: Friday, January 23, 2004 11:51 AM
To: discuss at interactiondesigners.com
Subject: [ID Discuss] Nice integration of HW and SW

Thought you all might enjoy this...

http://www.designiris.com/graphiclink/

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25 Jan 2004 - 3:52am
Mads Vedel Jensen
2004

I agree with Erik, that "The overall demo is better than the terrible applications that demonstrate". When I first saw the Graphic Link demo I was impressed with the lovely eye-candy effect and regarded it as being that and not much more. Trying out Oliver's working mock-ups in real life convinced me otherwise.
The mental and physical links that are created are quite impressive and the difference in experience clearly underlines many of the limitations in screen/mouse/keyboard based interaction. It also shows how difficult it is to convey tangible 3D ideas in a 2D space.
I also agree with Ido that it "Clearly shows that decent interaction design is much
more than nice graphical innovations", only that my point is that Oliver has added more than nice graphical innovations to the interaction design.

I think this could be a good starting point to a class discussion
about the role of legacy in (tangible) interface design, and about whether
and when older (tangible) interaction conventions should be reconsidered.
(thank you Ido :o)

Mads Vedel Jensen
Ph.D. Candidate
Mads Clausen Institute for Product Innovation
University of Southern Denmark

-----Original Message-----
From: Erik Harrison [;]
Sent: Sun 1/25/2004 4:20 AM
To: Shavit, Ido; 'josh at 36partners.com'; discuss at interactiondesigners.com
Cc:
Subject: RE: [ID Discuss] Nice integration of HW and SW

Actually, I think that it's a fabulous integration of HW and SW. The overall demo
is better than the terrible applications that demonstrate.

Really, what I see is that Interaction Design or whatever we call it this week has
two prongs which don't always get along, which is the physical design, and the
cognitive design. In portable devices, who hasn't turned the scroll wheel the wrong
way? This design makes it really easy to link the physical interface to the
virtual interface cognitively, but then you have problems with the physical effects
of the design - cognitively its simple enough, but turning your arm that way is
not.

For example, a washing machine as a legacy interface - but I've learned on the
legacy interface. The cognitive burden of learning a new interface may be greater
than the physical inconvinience of the design.

-Erik

--- "Shavit, Ido" <IShavit at athoc.com> wrote:
Nice idea and nice presentation, but a bit immature, and not really "nice
integration" (MHO). Clearly shows that decent interaction design is much
more than nice graphical innovations.

I would also argue that these ideas, as much as they are eye-candies, do not
solve any real world problems. (Though I do see the "coolness factor", and
appreciate the effect of "coolness" on sales and marketing and to an extent,
on user experience).

1. The "Watch" idea: Very innovative, but is it applicable? Users would have
to wear the watch loose enough to slide it up and down. Even worse, you
would need to rotate both your arms to some very uncomfortable angles to
work with this interface.

2. MP3 players: one of the bigger pains in the current trend of MP3 players
is the lack of screen real-estate. I can not see how the design presented
here addresses this problem. On the contrary, this would waste valuable
space for visual gimmickry.

3. The Washing Machine: too many (contradicting) "indicators", wrong
selector design.
A. The blue dot on the 'rotary selector' - points always to the 60 degree
mark. At the minimum, the blue dot should be removed.
Actually, the whole idea of this rotary design was to enable the user to
apply enough force to change the mechanical washer settings. This is no
longer the case. The settings are electronically controlled, and you can
provide other, gentler and more precise means of selection.
B. There is a small notch as part of the temperature dial which points to
the selected temperature. However, it is much less prominent than the left
pointing triangle with the word TEMP at the bottom of the LCD screen, next
to the control buttons, which points to a different temperature on the dial.
This design will no doubt cause confusion.
C. Is the temperature dial physical? I believe not, as it changes according
to the mode. Why list the options in a rotating fashion on the dial? Isn't
it better to display the options in a way it will be easy to read? Why not
limit the display in the dial to a single (current) option?

I could go on and on. My point is: this is absolutely not a good example of
"Nice integration of HW and SW".

BTW
The Washing Machine example is a good starting point to a class discussion
about the role of legacy in (tangible) interface design, and about whether
and when older (tangible) interaction conventions should be broken.

Ido

-----Original Message-----

From: Joshua Seiden [mailto:josh at 36partners.com]
Sent: Friday, January 23, 2004 11:51 AM
To: discuss at interactiondesigners.com
Subject: [ID Discuss] Nice integration of HW and SW

Thought you all might enjoy this...

http://www.designiris.com/graphiclink/

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25 Jan 2004 - 10:52pm
Nick Ragouzis
2004

Re: designiris.com/GraphicLink
Thanks for the pointer Joshua, I hadn't seen this.

While I generally agree with assessments so far, pro and con
(even though I find Ido's remarks compelling) I'm left wondering
about something ... which I can sum up in a phrase that a friend
recently used about an idea of mine:

"It's so 1990's."

Well, yes, the idea was from the (late) 1990s ... but it -was- a
good idea.

Anyway, this "was" nature seems to be the legacy of all indexes
... things we build or use to point at other things.

Indexes as Flashbacks
---------------------
This isn't limited to physical indexes, although it includes them.
You will recall how 'indexed' movies of the past were, and how
(although differently) they are now. A primary use of the index
there was to demonstrate or insert the parallel to the prior era's
stage-based event.

And so it has been in screen-based computing. The scroll bar is one
such index that will leave us, eventually. Certainly the manipulator,
and probably too the indicator as we know it.

Advertising has a long history of indexes in many forms. And is an
interesting case with which GraphicLink might share some characteristics
... advertisers are driven to move faster than the idioms of the age
(well, they try to! ... to stay not far behind the innovators of the age)
and indexes serve as a form of interpreter/navigator to those following
behind. In general though, flashbacks are a weak form in communications.

Following this line, GraphicLink likely *was* a good idea, when
first conceived ... but now it's more problematic. The problems
are easy to see, and mostly involve the designer's choice of a
perspective. Thus you end up with the (obvious, I think :-) )
error of putting the index (and marking dot) on the twist knob of
the washing machine control. More machinery but still high
dependence on design-time decisions. That's not good.

Immutable Modality?: Panning and Tracking
-----------------------------------------
I agree with the difficulties too in consuming screen real estate. But
what would the trade off be? Well, better than indicating navigation
would be indicating effect. And that's what we've been tending too,
and away from indexes and deep menus, etc -- removing that indirection
is crucial. Idempotence, simulation, preview, and smarter 'smarts' are
probably more important to pursue and indicate
in more complex devices.

On the heels of the wash demo, the watch demo reinforces the one
very deep problem with the GraphicLink as a candidate for a robust
solution that extends past designer decisions: the differences
between panning and tracking will always be with us. It seems to be
one modal thing that's insurmountable -- and up to the designer (and
those users who will change settings) to make the decision about
what's default. So GraphicLink's role would be to communicate the
*design decision* ... but not solve it.

Interactive Frames
------------------
For the actual solution (in high-interaction devices) we await fully
interactive frames -- and the break from the immoveable iris that is
the desktop we've known. With such frames, when you push the frame
you are panning (i.e., translating the camera, what GraphicLink
demonstrates); when you push the content (as in a touch screen gesture)
you are tracking.

Until then, activating, executing, and indicating autoscrolling might
do just as well. By indication, I mean that some users might perform
better if the hot area at the edge of the frame (e.g., a virtual window)
is marked in a way that indicates it's symbiosis with the actual device
frame (the real iris) even when the area isn't active. Know of anyone
who's studied that effect? Or the performance of that scroller that comes
up when you (depending on platform) cord-click or wheel-click or whatever,
(although I see few users who know about it)? What is that called anyway?

Having said all that, I'll note that GraphicLink may test well ... it's
interesting eye candy, I agree. But before I'd 'go' with any results I'd
pay close attention to the payoff for onset effect -- that ability to tell
the multi-device user what's up *at/before* the first toggle, and then to
get out of the way. If the payoff is high (for example, in a situation
where an initial twiddle would have a high relative cost) then I'd look
further at it but otherwise (and without longer trials with a specific
solution) I'd pass. I think.

Best,
--Nick

25 Jan 2004 - 10:55pm
Matt White
2004

This is definitely an interesting design. The input device and the
screen have a very strong, direct relationship. The side of the input
wheel turning to a pointer on the settings screen (in the overview) was
the best part. If any part of this system becomes popular, this should
be it.

I'm not sure everyone would benefit from the tractor feed hole system
in the mp3 or the gear meshing in the overview. It seems to be
wow-factor/clutter more than a good means to scroll.

As others have noted, the watch is nice but my wrist isn't that large.
Exactly what does turning the bezel do when in the "time" position?

The washing machine, well, confused the heck out of me. I have no idea
what was going on there.

On Jan 23, 2004, at 2:51 PM, Joshua Seiden wrote:

> Thought you all might enjoy this...
>
> http://www.designiris.com/graphiclink/
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Interaction Design Discussion List
> discuss at interactiondesigners.com
> --
> to change your options (unsubscribe or set digest):
> http://discuss.interactiondesigners.com
> --
> Questions: lists at interactiondesigners.com
> --
> Announcement Online List (discussion list members get announcements
> already)
> http://interactiondesigners.com/announceList/
> --
> http://interactiondesigners.com/
>

26 Jan 2004 - 2:31pm
Svoboda, Eric
2004

Does anyone know the author? Tell him/her to spell check the Benefits
page... don't want to give the whole comunitee a bad name!

-----Original Message-----
From:
discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesign
ers.com]On Behalf Of Matt White
Sent: Sunday, January 25, 2004 9:56 PM
To: discuss at interactiondesigners.com
Subject: Re: [ID Discuss] Nice integration of HW and SW

This is definitely an interesting design. The input device and the
screen have a very strong, direct relationship. The side of the input
wheel turning to a pointer on the settings screen (in the overview) was
the best part. If any part of this system becomes popular, this should
be it.

I'm not sure everyone would benefit from the tractor feed hole system
in the mp3 or the gear meshing in the overview. It seems to be
wow-factor/clutter more than a good means to scroll.

As others have noted, the watch is nice but my wrist isn't that large.
Exactly what does turning the bezel do when in the "time" position?

The washing machine, well, confused the heck out of me. I have no idea
what was going on there.

On Jan 23, 2004, at 2:51 PM, Joshua Seiden wrote:

> Thought you all might enjoy this...
>
> http://www.designiris.com/graphiclink/
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Interaction Design Discussion List
> discuss at interactiondesigners.com
> --
> to change your options (unsubscribe or set digest):
> http://discuss.interactiondesigners.com
> --
> Questions: lists at interactiondesigners.com
> --
> Announcement Online List (discussion list members get announcements
> already)
> http://interactiondesigners.com/announceList/
> --
> http://interactiondesigners.com/
>

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26 Jan 2004 - 11:49pm
Mark Canlas
2003

The thing I don't like about the design on the "overview" page is how the
jog dial (yeah?) is pushable. The force required to push the dial inward is
unstable. That is, when a user wants to confirm a selection and doesn't push
inward at a very perpendicular angle, the force of the button push could
change into a rotary selection and maybe make an incorrect selection. Just a
thought.

Mark Canlas
Human-Computer Interaction Representative
NJIT Student Senate

-----Original Message-----
From:
discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.
com] On Behalf Of Joshua Seiden
Sent: Friday, January 23, 2004 14:51
To: discuss at interactiondesigners.com
Subject: [ID Discuss] Nice integration of HW and SW

Thought you all might enjoy this...

http://www.designiris.com/graphiclink/

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27 Jan 2004 - 9:42am
Coryndon Luxmoore
2004

Saw this article on Gizmodo.com (fabulous site) It has a nice high-level
overview of how electronics manufacturers are exploring more
physical/gestural feedback in electronic interfaces.

http://neasia.nikkeibp.com/wcs/leaf?CID=onair/asabt/fw/287415

My favorite is the screen that can change its physical button configuration
based on mode. Very fancy.

--CML

-----Original Message-----
From:
discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.
com] On Behalf Of Mark Canlas
Sent: Monday, January 26, 2004 11:49 PM
To: josh at 36partners.com; discuss at interactiondesigners.com
Subject: RE: [ID Discuss] Nice integration of HW and SW

The thing I don't like about the design on the "overview" page is how the
jog dial (yeah?) is pushable. The force required to push the dial inward is
unstable. That is, when a user wants to confirm a selection and doesn't push
inward at a very perpendicular angle, the force of the button push could
change into a rotary selection and maybe make an incorrect selection. Just a
thought.

Mark Canlas
Human-Computer Interaction Representative NJIT Student Senate

-----Original Message-----
From:
discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.
com] On Behalf Of Joshua Seiden
Sent: Friday, January 23, 2004 14:51
To: discuss at interactiondesigners.com
Subject: [ID Discuss] Nice integration of HW and SW

Thought you all might enjoy this...

http://www.designiris.com/graphiclink/

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30 Jan 2004 - 1:58am
Dan Zlotnikov
2004

A new age of mistaken intentions being heralded in? The problem that
immediately pops into my head is that a user would be unable to make a
movement without the risk of accidentally issuing a command.

Alternatively, the sensors would either have to focus on a very narrow
location (which counters the convenience given to us by a remote control
in the first place) or would have to get a lot smarter, tracking things
like the user's focus or which way the user's head is turned. Of course,
that still doesn't solve the problem of looking away at something and
hitting "pause" at the same time.

Dan Zlotnikov

On Tue, 27 Jan 2004, Coryndon Luxmoore wrote:

> Saw this article on Gizmodo.com (fabulous site) It has a nice high-level
> overview of how electronics manufacturers are exploring more
> physical/gestural feedback in electronic interfaces.
>
> http://neasia.nikkeibp.com/wcs/leaf?CID=onair/asabt/fw/287415
>
> My favorite is the screen that can change its physical button configuration
> based on mode. Very fancy.
>
> --CML

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