IxD

14 Mar 2005 - 7:29am
9 years ago
21 replies
453 reads
Chris Kelly
2005

Hi All,

I have a question for all you IxD experts that could really help me. I have just qualified from a degree in HCI, and am aiming to start a job in Interaction Design. I have a good grounding in general usability, but would like to find out more about good, practical IxD that would help me prepare for a career in this field. I know a book alone isn't enough, and experience is the most vital thing, but everyone has to start somewhere.

Are there any good books people can recommend?

Is there an IxD bible?
Is there a good book that describes practical methodologies?
Is there any book you can recommend that you find invaluable, or that you use frequently?
What would you recommend as a good introduction to IxD?

I realise people have made lots of recommendations in the archives, but I know that new books come out all the time, so would like the best, most up to date recommendations.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated! You could really make a difference to my future career. Please help!

All the very best
Chris

Send instant messages to your online friends http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com

Comments

14 Mar 2005 - 9:04am
Patricia Mullenberg
2005

Just looking at my desk these are probably my most valuable books.

Where did you study? There isn't currently anywhere in South Africa where I can study so I'm looking to do it via correspondence. Can anyone recommend anywhere? The University of Idaho is the only one I could find that had an online degree.

Thanks
Trish

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com [mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Chris Kelly
Sent: Montag, 14. März 2005 14:30
To: discuss-interactiondesigners.com at lists.interactiondesigners.com
Subject: [ID Discuss] IxD

[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]

Hi All,

I have a question for all you IxD experts that could really help me. I have just qualified from a degree in HCI, and am aiming to start a job in Interaction Design. I have a good grounding in general usability, but would like to find out more about good, practical IxD that would help me prepare for a career in this field. I know a book alone isn't enough, and experience is the most vital thing, but everyone has to start somewhere.

Are there any good books people can recommend?

Is there an IxD bible?
Is there a good book that describes practical methodologies?
Is there any book you can recommend that you find invaluable, or that you use frequently?
What would you recommend as a good introduction to IxD?

I realise people have made lots of recommendations in the archives, but I know that new books come out all the time, so would like the best, most up to date recommendations.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated! You could really make a difference to my future career. Please help!

All the very best
Chris

Send instant messages to your online friends http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com
_______________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
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14 Mar 2005 - 9:15am
Petteri Hiisilä
2004

Chris Kelly wrote:

> Are there any good books people can recommend?
>
> Is there an IxD bible?
>

Yes: About Face 2.0: The Essentials of Interaction Design
http://dy.fi/01

> Is there a good book that describes practical methodologies?
>

Yes: About Face 2.0: The Essentials of Interaction Design
http://dy.fi/01

> Is there any book you can recommend that you find invaluable,
> or that you use frequently?
>

Yes: About Face 2.0: The Essentials of Interaction Design
http://dy.fi/01

> What would you recommend as a good introduction to IxD?
>

About Face 2.0: The Essentials of Interaction Design
http://dy.fi/01

> I realise people have made lots of recommendations in the
> archives, but I know that new books come out all the time,
> so would like the best, most up to date recommendations.
>

Actually, this one is good too. The first one will tell you
the practices, this one will tell you the mindset:

The Inmates Are Running the Asylum : Why High Tech Products
Drive Us Crazy and How to Restore the Sanity (2nd Edition)

http://dy.fi/im4

Those two really are the basic books right from the pioneers of IxD.

Taking this course is very useful, if your future employer pays it for you:
http://www.cooper.com/content/cooperu/classes.asp
http://www.cooper.com/content/cooperu/cooper_practicum.pdf

Best,
Petteri :)

--
Petteri Hiisilä
Palveluarkkitehti / Interaction Designer /
Alma Media Interactive Oy / NWS /
+358505050123 / petteri.hiisila at almamedia.fi

"I was told there's a miracle for each day that I try"
- John Petrucci

14 Mar 2005 - 9:28am
Dave Malouf
2005

On 3/14/05 9:15 AM, "Petteri Hiisilä" <petteri.hiisila at luukku.com> wrote:

> Yes: About Face 2.0: The Essentials of Interaction Design
> http://dy.fi/01

I think Petteri likes About Face. ;)

A book on more of the theoretical side of things is Digital Ground by Malcom
McCullough is an amazing book (and I'm only on Chapter 2). It talks about
foundational pieces of IxD that while not directly practical in nature, are
necessary in informing the practical. I'm lovin' it. It speaks of IxD in a
way that dream about when I think about the IxDG (mind you I think about
IxDG A LOT!).

-- dave

14 Mar 2005 - 9:32am
Lada Gorlenko
2004

PH> Yes: About Face 2.0: The Essentials of Interaction Design
[snip]

PH> Yes: About Face 2.0: The Essentials of Interaction Design
PH> http://dy.fi/01
[snip]

PH> Yes: About Face 2.0: The Essentials of Interaction Design
PH> http://dy.fi/01
[snip, snip, snip]

Petteri, ever heard of the Ten Commandments (the 2nd* one in
particular?) :-)

Lada

(*) "You shall have no other gods besides Me..."

14 Mar 2005 - 9:38am
Dave Malouf
2005

On 3/14/05 9:32 AM, "Lada Gorlenko" <lada at acm.org> wrote:

> Petteri, ever heard of the Ten Commandments (the 2nd* one in
> particular?) :-)
>
> Lada
>
> (*) "You shall have no other gods besides Me..."

Oh this is fun on too many levels.
Who is "Me"?

Also, the 10 commandments says nothing about demigods, just gods.
Neither does it mention cult-of-personalities. ;)

Wait! Don't the 10-commandments only count if you believe in a Judeo
Christian Islamic Druze ... G-d?

Ok, I'll cease ... But we do have to find more ways to have fun on Monday,
right?

I suggest you check out OK-Cancel (www.ok-cancel.com) ... It is always a
great way to wake up on a Monday (if you didn't check it over the weekend).

-- dave

14 Mar 2005 - 9:47am
Richard Czerwonka
2005

> Are there any good books people can recommend?

Not books exactly, but some good web sites to look at:

http://www.asktog.com/menus/designMenu.html#columns
http://www.joelonsoftware.com/uibook/chapters/fog0000000057.html

If you're really keen, you can check out Microsofts official Windows standards, even
though they rarely follow the standards themselves:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/dnwue/html/ch14a.asp

=================
Richard Czerwonka,
Delphi Programmer
ENT Technologies
Mob: 0412 104 042
=================

14 Mar 2005 - 9:57am
Petteri Hiisilä
2004

>PH> Yes: About Face 2.0: The Essentials of Interaction Design
>PH> http://dy.fi/01
>[snip, snip, snip]
>
>Petteri, ever heard of the Ten Commandments (the 2nd* one in
>particular?) :-)
>
>
>

Yeah, and I break them all the time, except this one :)

But seriously: since Chris has to start from somewhere, I cannot think
of any other "first" book
that covers the essentials as well as this one. It's an easy read,
practical, full of insight, and
gives a solid platform to read any other book on the subject.

Digital Ground sounds brilliant too, but perhaps not as a first book.

Best,
Petteri

--
Petteri Hiisilä
Palveluarkkitehti / Interaction Designer /
Alma Media Interactive Oy / NWS /
+358505050123 / petteri.hiisila at almamedia.fi

"I was told there's a miracle for each day that I try"
- John Petrucci

14 Mar 2005 - 10:06am
Lada Gorlenko
2004

DH> Ok, I'll cease ... But we do have to find more ways to have fun on Monday,
DH> right?

Right.

IBM Research hosts an internal online publication "Blue Monday".
One of the hottest sections is "Buzzword Bingo": from 667 entries (the
number is growing everyday), 25 buzzwords are randomly selected on
page (re)load (5x5 table). The game is simple... Print out the Bingo
card on your screen and take it to your next meeting. Whenever a
buzzword is used, cross it off. When you have five in a row (across,
down, or diagonal), shout "BINGO!" - you've won.

For your amusement, my today's card (seven cross-offs so far, no
Bingo-s yet):

Row 1: point_of_arrival | maniacal_focus | yadda_yadda_yadda | x-functional | ready to roll
Row 2: new_agenda | to_the_extent_that | intuitive | strategize | evolve
Row 3: autognomic | proactive | productionize | guesstimate | meltdown
Row 4: walk_the_talk | visioning | one-on-one | sector | taxonomize
Row 5: COB(close_of_business)| e-cronym | opportunity_challenge | out-of-pocket | e-enable

Thoroughly enjoyable and very much addictive game :-)

Lada

14 Mar 2005 - 10:29am
Narey, Kevin
2004

Lada wrote:
>Row 1: point_of_arrival | maniacal_focus | yadda_yadda_yadda | x-functional
| ready to roll
>Row 2: new_agenda | to_the_extent_that | intuitive | strategize | evolve
>Row 3: autognomic | proactive | productionize | guesstimate | meltdown
>Row 4: walk_the_talk | visioning | one-on-one | sector | taxonomize
>Row 5: COB(close_of_business)| e-cronym | opportunity_challenge |
out-of-pocket | e-enable

House!

Many excellent books mentioned previously, but didn't notice Mullet and
Sano's "Designing Visual Interfaces" ISBN 0-13-303389-9. An essential IxD
read IMHO.

Kevin

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14 Mar 2005 - 10:34am
Robert Reimann
2003

Designing Visual Interfaces is one of my favorites, too.

Here's a few other useful/interesting titles:

The Art of Interactive Design, by Chris Crawford

Software for Use, by Constantine and Lockwood

The Elements of User Experience, by Jesse James Garrett

Understanding Comics, by Scott McCloud

Observing the User Experience, by Mike Kuniavsky

Emotional Design (Ch. 1-3), by Don Norman
and of course The Design of Everyday Things

The Timeless Way of Building, by Christopher Alexander

Design for the Real World, by Victor Papanek

Learning How to Learn, by Novak and Gowin

The Visual Display of Quantitative Information, by Edward Tufte

Robert.

-----Original Message-----
From:
discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesign
ers.com] On Behalf Of Chris Kelly
Sent: Monday, March 14, 2005 7:30 AM
To: discuss-interactiondesigners.com at lists.interactiondesigners.com
Subject: [ID Discuss] IxD

[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
material.]

Hi All,

I have a question for all you IxD experts that could really help me. I
have just qualified from a degree in HCI, and am aiming to start a job
in Interaction Design. I have a good grounding in general usability,
but would like to find out more about good, practical IxD that would
help me prepare for a career in this field. I know a book alone isn't
enough, and experience is the most vital thing, but everyone has to
start somewhere.

Are there any good books people can recommend?

Is there an IxD bible?
Is there a good book that describes practical methodologies?
Is there any book you can recommend that you find invaluable, or that
you use frequently?
What would you recommend as a good introduction to IxD?

I realise people have made lots of recommendations in the archives, but
I know that new books come out all the time, so would like the best,
most up to date recommendations.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated! You could really make a
difference to my future career. Please help!

All the very best
Chris

Send instant messages to your online friends
http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com
_______________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixdg.org
(Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixdg.org/ Announcements List
......... http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
Questions .................. lists at ixdg.org
Home ....................... http://ixdg.org/

14 Mar 2005 - 10:50am
John Vaughan - ...
2004

My Votes:

Alan Cooper (my hero, sigh......)

Understanding Comics, by Scott McCloud

The Visual Display of Quantitative Information, by Edward Tufte

Ok/Cancel

And a suggestion:
(A bit dated, but always interesting)
Marshall McLuhan
"If it works, It's obsolete."

* Thanks to all for suggestions - invigorating...

14 Mar 2005 - 2:32pm
Per Sökjer
2004

I notice Understanding Comics is already mentioned...
I find Sequential Art by the late Will Eisner being in the same league
as McClouds book
and also really relevant for IxD.

Books I feel important to add to any IxD reading list are:
Design Methods by J.C. Jones
and of course
Thoughtful Interaction Design by J. Lowgren & E. Stolterman.

I'm reading Interface Culture by Steven Johnson for the moment and
might put it on some list some day... :-)

Regards.
:Per

2005-03-14 kl. 16.34 skrev Reimann, Robert:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
>
> Designing Visual Interfaces is one of my favorites, too.
>
>
> Here's a few other useful/interesting titles:
>
> The Art of Interactive Design, by Chris Crawford
>
> Software for Use, by Constantine and Lockwood
>
> The Elements of User Experience, by Jesse James Garrett
>
> Understanding Comics, by Scott McCloud
>
> Observing the User Experience, by Mike Kuniavsky
>
> Emotional Design (Ch. 1-3), by Don Norman
> and of course The Design of Everyday Things
>
> The Timeless Way of Building, by Christopher Alexander
>
> Design for the Real World, by Victor Papanek
>
> Learning How to Learn, by Novak and Gowin
>
> The Visual Display of Quantitative Information, by Edward Tufte
>
>
> Robert.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From:
> discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
> [mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-
> bounces at lists.interactiondesign
> ers.com] On Behalf Of Chris Kelly
> Sent: Monday, March 14, 2005 7:30 AM
> To: discuss-interactiondesigners.com at lists.interactiondesigners.com
> Subject: [ID Discuss] IxD
>
>
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
>
> Hi All,
>
>
>
> I have a question for all you IxD experts that could really help me. I
> have just qualified from a degree in HCI, and am aiming to start a job
> in Interaction Design. I have a good grounding in general usability,
> but would like to find out more about good, practical IxD that would
> help me prepare for a career in this field. I know a book alone isn't
> enough, and experience is the most vital thing, but everyone has to
> start somewhere.
>
> Are there any good books people can recommend?
>
> Is there an IxD bible?
> Is there a good book that describes practical methodologies?
> Is there any book you can recommend that you find invaluable, or
> that
> you use frequently?
> What would you recommend as a good introduction to IxD?
>
> I realise people have made lots of recommendations in the archives, but
> I know that new books come out all the time, so would like the best,
> most up to date recommendations.
>
>
>
> Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated! You could really make a
> difference to my future career. Please help!
>
>
>
> All the very best
> Chris
>
> Send instant messages to your online friends
> http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com
> _______________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixdg.org
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixdg.org/ Announcements
> List
> ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixdg.org
> Home ....................... http://ixdg.org/
> _______________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixdg.org
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixdg.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixdg.org
> Home ....................... http://ixdg.org/
>

14 Mar 2005 - 2:36pm
Bill DeRouchey
2010

On Understanding Comics, it's not only a wonderful book to think big about
interaction, but it's also helpful for designing deliverables. I'm going
through a phase right now where I'm trying to apply some of the principles
from UC into creating documentation that conveys more in less space. We'll
see how it goes.

Bill DeRouchey

14 Mar 2005 - 2:43pm
Dave Malouf
2005

Robert (and others), While I think these lists are great ... I'm "concerned"
that we are putting examples out there that are beyond the realm of IxD.

The ones that jump out at me are "Elements of UX", "observing UX", and
"emotional design".

One of our primary caveats in creating a viable and feasible organization is
that we must remained focused on Interaction Design, and not be about
everything. This person's request was about IxD, no?

Is there a space for us to even begin to talk about IxD w/o crossing into
the realm of all of UX? I realize that everything listed is completely
relevant, but if I was to create a taxonomy where UX is the parent and I
wanted to put resources into it where IxD is a child of UX ... Using the
books below as a sample set, I see many of them being in UX, and only a few
in IxD.

I realize this might seem like an academic exercise, but I am also thinking
of this as a group building exercise ( and in fact a test run) to determine
viability and feasibility.

-- dave

On 3/14/05 10:34 AM, "Reimann, Robert" <Robert_Reimann at bose.com> wrote:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
>
> Designing Visual Interfaces is one of my favorites, too.
>
>
> Here's a few other useful/interesting titles:
>
> The Art of Interactive Design, by Chris Crawford
>
> Software for Use, by Constantine and Lockwood
>
> The Elements of User Experience, by Jesse James Garrett
>
> Understanding Comics, by Scott McCloud
>
> Observing the User Experience, by Mike Kuniavsky
>
> Emotional Design (Ch. 1-3), by Don Norman
> and of course The Design of Everyday Things
>
> The Timeless Way of Building, by Christopher Alexander
>
> Design for the Real World, by Victor Papanek
>
> Learning How to Learn, by Novak and Gowin
>
> The Visual Display of Quantitative Information, by Edward Tufte
>
>
> Robert.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From:
> discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
> [mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesign
> ers.com] On Behalf Of Chris Kelly
> Sent: Monday, March 14, 2005 7:30 AM
> To: discuss-interactiondesigners.com at lists.interactiondesigners.com
> Subject: [ID Discuss] IxD
>
>
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
>
> Hi All,
>
>
>
> I have a question for all you IxD experts that could really help me. I
> have just qualified from a degree in HCI, and am aiming to start a job
> in Interaction Design. I have a good grounding in general usability,
> but would like to find out more about good, practical IxD that would
> help me prepare for a career in this field. I know a book alone isn't
> enough, and experience is the most vital thing, but everyone has to
> start somewhere.
>
> Are there any good books people can recommend?
>
> Is there an IxD bible?
> Is there a good book that describes practical methodologies?
> Is there any book you can recommend that you find invaluable, or that
> you use frequently?
> What would you recommend as a good introduction to IxD?
>
> I realise people have made lots of recommendations in the archives, but
> I know that new books come out all the time, so would like the best,
> most up to date recommendations.
>
>
>
> Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated! You could really make a
> difference to my future career. Please help!
>
>
>
> All the very best
> Chris
>
> Send instant messages to your online friends
> http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com
> _______________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixdg.org
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixdg.org/ Announcements List
> ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixdg.org
> Home ....................... http://ixdg.org/
> _______________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixdg.org
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixdg.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixdg.org
> Home ....................... http://ixdg.org/

14 Mar 2005 - 5:16pm
John Vaughan - ...
2004

Dave sez>While I think these lists are great ... I'm
> "concerned"that we are putting examples out there that are beyond
> the realm of IxD.
> Is there a space for us to even begin to talk about IxD w/o
> crossing into
> the realm of all of UX?

hmmmm.....

Reasonable points - Esp the implicit understanding that there's a lot of grey area, overlap and synergy beneath the Big Umbrella. Within the broad scope of UX, IxD is uniquely challenged to provide practical solutions. As a generalist - and I believe that "we" tend to be such, by definition - I find a lot of value in the full range of UX resources.

Perhaps I'm a romantic, but it seems that we take those wide-ranging UX-type observations & insights, apply them to the task at hand and - somehow - (poof!) - A Miracle Happens. In a sense, IxD is magic.

The spark of creative insight often occurs at the boundaries of IxD.

Maybe that's just crazy talk...

14 Mar 2005 - 5:24pm
Lada Gorlenko
2004

von> Perhaps I'm a romantic, but it seems that we take those
von> wide-ranging UX-type observations & insights, apply them to the
von> task at hand and - somehow - (poof!) - A Miracle Happens. In a
von> sense, IxD is magic.

von> The spark of creative insight often occurs at the boundaries of IxD.

It makes two of us (romantics), and we urgently need someone else to
join us, before it gets out of hands and becomes too cosy and totally
politically incorrect a union :-)

Lada

14 Mar 2005 - 5:35pm
Dave Malouf
2005

On 3/14/05 5:24 PM, "Lada Gorlenko" <lada at acm.org> wrote:

> It makes two of us (romantics), and we urgently need someone else to
> join us, before it gets out of hands and becomes too cosy and totally
> politically incorrect a union :-)

Hmmm? I think there are a lot of romantics out there ... I think that's
great. I'm not talking about "who owns it" ... What I am asking is, "is
there any need to define what makes up the whole, but defining the
components?"

Why here? Why not CHIWEB? Why not SIGIA-L? Why not UPA? Or other
communities. There are some 1500 subscribers to this list who in some way
found this group and decided that (or's):
1. what is going on here is "different"
2. IxD is different from what already exists

AND there is a significant group of people who are working on creating a new
organization out of this psuedo-community based on some evaluation of what
exists, and a conclusion that what exists does not meet the primary needs of
this group, as loosely (or actually quite specifically) defined on our web
site (http://define.ixdg.org/).

THAT definition and our mission tries to put us in the light of being a
piece of UX, and not a filter of it - a possibility that many people don't
talk about; that I beginning to explore in my head. If we are a "filter" of
UX, that means that our set of cross-disciplinary tools gravitates towards
the "type" of problem sets we are must accustomed to working with (now) +
those problem sets we were working on previously. This is very disjointed,
but in the end there are still those "disciplines" that make up that
"cross-disciplinary" tool bag.

Oy! This is getting circular. I can't wait for this discussion tomorrow
night at the UXnet event, which btw, if you are hooked on the fact that
there is UX and only UX and everything else is just too particular to truly
discuss, then there is UXnet protecting you. ;)

Personally, I'm not convinced that the parts don't exist quite yet. I also
don't believe that any one part is more "special" than any other. I.e. IxD
is more important than IA or Visual Design. Being a "generalist" is a luxury
of the experienced. To get there you had to cross many roads and boudaries
and gain many experiences. What I don't like is (this not an accusation) is
why less experienced souls claim generalist stature without ever having done
all the work necessary to obtain that stature. While they are "rising" what
should they look at? Now for IxD, what are those items?

-- dave

-- dave

David Heller
http://synapticburn.com/
http://ixdg.org
dave at ixdg.org
dave at synapticburn.com
AIM: bolinhanyc || Y!: dave_ux || MSN: hippiefunk at hotmail.com

14 Mar 2005 - 6:27pm
Lada Gorlenko
2004

DH> What I am asking is, "is there any need to define what makes up
DH> the whole, but defining the components?"

Yes, there is. A huge one.

DH> Being a "generalist" is a luxury of the experienced.

I disagree. Totally, completely, passionately and wholeheartedly.

Being able to carefully separate a component from the whole and from
other components, being able to concentrate and see the true beauty of
a particular part among the textures and flavours of many other parts
IS a luxury of the experienced. THEY have an eye for it, they can
define the primary needs, the boundaries, the overall goals, and
whatever. Because THEY know what the part is all about.

If novices start concentrating on a component and learning the
component and nothing but it, they will end up living in a world of a
single component. They will grow up believing that there is little
beyond the component, because they haven't developed proper
understanding and appreciation for the whole. For the big. For the
mechanism where the component is an essential cog that is more
important as part of the system than as an individual entity. But the
grown up specialists won't know it, if no one explained it to them in
due time.

It's a spiral. You start with learning the whole to understand the
place of the part in it and how the part is affected by the whole and
by the part's neighbours. Then you learn the details of the part
itself, get your hands dirty fixing it, start knowing it inside out.
The whole must be there all the time -- to guide you, not to distract.
And then you look at the whole once again, from the platform of your
experience, your knowledge of the detail. And then and only then you
realise the true place and shape of the component.

This is what the true value of education is all about, as opposed to
vocational and other training. Education is about learning to see, to
draw parallels, to understand - about learning to *think*, not to
memorise examples and follow instructions. The worst one can do to an
inquisitive mind is to set boundaries and directions when it is eager
to explore.

Don't be afraid of getting some sand when looking for gold particles,
they will wash away. Be afraid of throwing a baby with the water when
searching for life on a new planet.

Lada

14 Mar 2005 - 7:18pm
Robert Reimann
2003

Emotional Design (Ch. 1-3) is very much about IxD, even if
Norman himself isn't completely clear on the matter. What he
and others traditionally think of as IxD is the aspect he calls
"Behavioral" design. These chapters are useful simply to
put in a theoretical perspective exactly how this kind
of design fits in with the other two aspects of design, which
Norman calls "Visceral" and "Reflective" design.

The truth of the matter is that these 3 aspects of design are all
a part of IxD, because the interplay of visceral, behavioral,
and reflective are subtle, and very much related to user goals,
perceptions, behaviors, and aspirations. I recently gave a lecture
at CMU linking these three aspects of design directly to the three
types of user goals (experience goals, end goals, and life goals)
discussed in About Face 2.0.

As for Jesse's book, it does a great job of showing the
interplay of two related design fields: content design (IA)
and IxD. To define the boundaries of IxD is to understand its
relationship to its sister disciplines.

And finally, I suggest that one should call himself/herself an
IxDer who is not thoroughly versed in techniques for understanding
and interpreting user behaviors.

Note that there's ID, graphic design, and architecture books in
my list as well. IxDers are, and must be, by nature, generalists,
because IxD is not just about design of behavior, but about design
of *form as it relates to behavior* and as it relates to people.
Lada makes the rest of this argument quite eloquently.

I think if we attempt to over-specialize (especially for political
reasons), it will be at our peril.

Robert.

-----Original Message-----
From: David Heller [mailto:dave at ixdg.org]
Sent: Monday, March 14, 2005 2:43 PM
To: Reimann, Robert;
discuss-interactiondesigners.com at lists.interactiondesigners.com
Subject: Re: [ID Discuss] IxD

Robert (and others), While I think these lists are great ... I'm
"concerned" that we are putting examples out there that are beyond the
realm of IxD.

The ones that jump out at me are "Elements of UX", "observing UX", and
"emotional design".

One of our primary caveats in creating a viable and feasible
organization is that we must remained focused on Interaction Design, and
not be about everything. This person's request was about IxD, no?

Is there a space for us to even begin to talk about IxD w/o crossing
into the realm of all of UX? I realize that everything listed is
completely relevant, but if I was to create a taxonomy where UX is the
parent and I wanted to put resources into it where IxD is a child of UX
... Using the books below as a sample set, I see many of them being in
UX, and only a few in IxD.

I realize this might seem like an academic exercise, but I am also
thinking of this as a group building exercise ( and in fact a test run)
to determine viability and feasibility.

-- dave

15 Mar 2005 - 2:58am
Jonas Löwgren
2003

My take on the request for readings is rather that exhaustive and
eclectic is good. Ultimately, it would be up to the reader to make her
own demarcations anyway.

In light of that, let me point you to a small annotated bibliography of
books that I think may be useful for interaction designers:
http://webzone.k3.mah.se/k3jolo/idBookshelf/index.htm

Regards,
Jonas Löwgren

----
Arts and Communication
Malmö University, SE-205 06 Malmö, Sweden

phone +46 7039 17854
web http://webzone.k3.mah.se/k3jolo

15 Mar 2005 - 2:39pm
Manu Sharma
2003

Chris Kelly
> What would you recommend as a good introduction to IxD?

Don't miss these gems on Tog's site:

First Principles of Interaction Design
http://www.asktog.com/basics/firstPrinciples.html

Maximizing Human Performance
http://www.asktog.com/basics/03Performance.html

Manu.

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