Eyetracking

23 Mar 2005 - 11:45am
9 years ago
3 replies
454 reads
Narey, Kevin
2004

I've read a little about eyetracking, but have waited for it to mature a
little before musing further. Has it been around for a sufficient enough
period to consider? From a modicum of personal research, it appears that
'market research' is the main target for those who provide this technology,
but it obviously has a wider potential. Anyone using it now?

I've long been an admirer of the work that has gone into css zen garden and
found the following article interesting:

http://blog.eyetools.net/eyetools_research/2005/02/css_zen_garden_.html

Kevin

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Comments

23 Mar 2005 - 12:11pm
Rebecca Grier
2005

Kevin,

In actuality eye tracking has been around since 1908, though it required
hand calculations back in the day. The earliest human factors
eye-tracking reference I have is Fitts, Jones, & Milton (1950)
Eye-movements of aircraft pilots during instrument landing approaches.
Aeronautical Engineering Review, 9, 24-29.

Eye-tracking has been used extensively in research on the human factors
of cockpit (both air and car) design, medical diagnosis from x-rays, and
many many other domains.

I used an eye-tracker in my dissertation research "Visual Attention and
Web Design." It is used extensively in market research. However,
usability professionals are also keen on the technology. One example can
be found at http://www.uie.com/articles/eye_tracking/

My point being a google search on eye movement and interface design or
human factors should turn up a bunch of references, it is a mature
technology used extensively to understand visual attention, moods,
cognitive workload, and much much more.

Rebecca Grier, Ph.D.
Human Systems Engineer

-----Original Message-----
From:
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[mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesign
ers.com] On Behalf Of Narey, Kevin
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2005 11:46 AM
To: IxD Mailinglist
Subject: [ID Discuss] Eyetracking

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I've read a little about eyetracking, but have waited for it to mature a
little before musing further. Has it been around for a sufficient enough
period to consider? From a modicum of personal research, it appears that
'market research' is the main target for those who provide this
technology,
but it obviously has a wider potential. Anyone using it now?

I've long been an admirer of the work that has gone into css zen garden
and
found the following article interesting:

http://blog.eyetools.net/eyetools_research/2005/02/css_zen_garden_.html

Kevin

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gedas united kingdom limited
Registered in England no. 1371338

This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential
and it may be privileged.

It is intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to
whom it is addressed.

If you have received this in error, please contact the sender
and delete the material immediately.
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23 Mar 2005 - 12:24pm
FelcanSmith, Mark
2004

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Narey, Kevin
> ... From a modicum of personal research, it appears that
> 'market research' is the main target for those who provide
> this technology, but it obviously has a wider potential.
> Anyone using it now?

I recently attended our local SIGCHI (Chicago SIG for Computer-Human
Interaction) where we had an eye tracking demo done by DePaul University
professors. DePaul has a relationship w/ User Centric with regards to
the eye tracking system.

A couple UX specialists from User Centric recently published an article
in UPA's User Experience magazine about eye tracking in the realm of
usability testing. (although I don't believe
http://www.upassoc.org/upa_publications/user_experience/current_issue/in
dex.html has the current issue available to the general public) This is
a good primer on eye tracking usage outside of a traditional market
research focus.

I went to the SIGCHI session thinking eye tracking is more for
research/academia, how is this applicable to my day-to-day work? Just
prior to attending I read UPA's UX article by User Centric on this
subject. If I had the ~$30k to bring in a system to my shop, I'd do
today because I see the value in integrating this type of research and
analysis well beyond market research activities. I primarily work on
browser-based applications, several projects deal w/ our customer
service center reps and how they interact w/ customer policy information
on-screen. In terms of information design, screen layout, system
interactions and responses (to name just a few) could all benefit from
incorporating eye tracking into my usability/analysis work.

User Centric eye tracking services page:
http://www.usercentric.com/UC/prodserv.asp?menu=0&sub=6

Tobii, eye tracking system manufacturer:
http://www.tobii.se/
Tobii usability applicability page:
http://www.tobii.se/usabAdver.html

hope this helps,
Mark

24 Mar 2005 - 12:21pm
Elizabeth Carpenter
2005

>Has it been around for a sufficient enough period to consider?

I was also at the SIGCHI eyetracking event here in Chicago.

The technology for eye tracking has been around for about 30 years, but it is only recently that the technology has matured enough. In the past participants had to either wear some type of head gear, or place their chin on a platform in order to stay still. With the system that Mark referenced (the same on DePaul and User Centric use) that is gone. People can sit in front of a moniter as they normally would.

In the past most research from this technology came out of psychology.

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