Bio/emotional feedback IxD

12 Apr 2005 - 12:53pm
9 years ago
8 replies
585 reads
Dave Malouf
2005

http://www.we-make-money-not-art.com/archives/005292.php

Would you want to drive a car that knows how you feel?

-- dave

David Heller
http://synapticburn.com/
http://ixdg.org
dave at ixdg.org
dave at synapticburn.com
AIM: bolinhanyc || Y!: dave_ux || MSN: hippiefunk at hotmail.com

Comments

12 Apr 2005 - 1:03pm
Dan Brown
2004

This example is a far cry from the advanced technology Dave mentions
below, but it's interesting nonetheless.

Though far from DETECTING how you feel, this exercise video for game
consoles will change depending on the mood you specify at the
beginning. If you indicate you're struggling to get motivated, the
virtual instructor will be more encouraging. Already enthusiastic
about your workout and the intstructor will tone down the
encouragements.

http://www.yourselffitness.com/default.aspx

The game takes into account all kinds of information -- your fitness
goals, the equipment you have on-hand, and your current level of
fitness -- to create a completely customized workout.

-- Dan

On Apr 12, 2005 1:53 PM, David Heller <dave at ixdg.org> wrote:
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
> http://www.we-make-money-not-art.com/archives/005292.php
>
> Would you want to drive a car that knows how you feel?
>
> -- dave
>
> David Heller
> http://synapticburn.com/
> http://ixdg.org
> dave at ixdg.org
> dave at synapticburn.com
> AIM: bolinhanyc || Y!: dave_ux || MSN: hippiefunk at hotmail.com
>
> _______________________________________________
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--
www.greenonions.com ~ brownorama at gmail.com ~ (301) 801-4850 ~ Murray RIP

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other people just like you."
-- Motto for Microsoft Research Asia (their most productive research team)

12 Apr 2005 - 1:04pm
Jack L. Moffett
2005

Would you want to drive a car that broadcast to the car in front of you how
you feel? Or that switched to classical music, instead of the upbeat rock 'n
roll you selected, because it decided you were agitated? Or decided to give
you a longer, scenic route because you didn't seem to be in a hurry?

Detecting that I driver is falling asleep is the one valuable concept
mentioned, but I don't think tone of voice would be the most effective way
to determine that. If I'm the only one in the car, I'm not talking. If other
people are in the car, and I'm talking to them, I'm probably not going to
fall asleep.

> Would you want to drive a car that knows how you feel?

Jack L. Moffett
Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.690.2360 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

I am in search of the
simple elegant seductive
maybe even obvious IDEA.
With this in my pocket
I cannot fail.

- Tibor Kalman

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13 Apr 2005 - 11:06am
Alain D. M. G. ...
2003

This is great! With a car showing to everybody else on the road how
the driver is feeling, then the nice persons who are on patrol to catch
speeders (or other miscreants) would know when to avoid ticketing a
speeder because he or she is feeling really, really depressed on that
day (no sense in driving the taxpayer towards suicide) or when not to
pull over somebody who is in an incredibly cheerful mood, lest their
day be ruined.

Alain Vaillancourt

--- David Heller <dave at ixdg.org> wrote:
> http://www.we-make-money-not-art.com/archives/005292.php
> Would you want to drive a car that knows how you feel?

__________________________________________________________
Lèche-vitrine ou lèche-écran ?
magasinage.yahoo.ca

13 Apr 2005 - 11:37am
Jack L. Moffett
2005

And of course, when you are angry, and you drive up behind somebody, they'll
get out of your way, rather than risk your wrath.

> This is great! With a car showing to everybody else on the road how
> the driver is feeling, then the nice persons who are on patrol to catch
> speeders (or other miscreants) would know when to avoid ticketing a
> speeder because he or she is feeling really, really depressed on that
> day (no sense in driving the taxpayer towards suicide) or when not to
> pull over somebody who is in an incredibly cheerful mood, lest their
> day be ruined.

Jack L. Moffett
Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.690.2360 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

If there's anything more annoying
than a machine that won't do what you want,
it's a machine that won't do what you want
and has been programmed to behave
as though it likes you.

- Don Norman

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14 Apr 2005 - 5:28am
Pierre Abel
2004

This article makes me think about the research CHI papers on
ubiquitous/pervasive computing I'm currently reading. .From my
understanding, one of the challenge is to use all possible inputs to
realize the communication between user and computer. It includes the
explicit input (e.g push the button ) as well as the implicit input (e.g
movement, mood, voice, etc..).
In this case, the implicit input is the user mood and how to use this
input in the context of a car. As it is written,the mood can be used to
choose the best road as well as telling everybody that you're angry
;-)... [note that the complex problem of evaluating your mood is out of
scope]
.
Well, I see this project as a typical research project, and from my
point of view it should not be analyzed in the same way as a industrial
project...researchers looks for an applications of an emerging
technology (here the possibility to analyze your mood) in a context of a
car. they are researchers not really practionners (even they talk about
putting this car in the market in 3-4 years...)
it makes me thinks about the recent thread (Bottom Line Design Awards)
where Robert Reimann spoke about disruptive technologies and the
associated applications which are successfully only 10 years after (I
remember Andrei gave nice examples such as Match.com)

Pierre

Jack L. Moffett wrote:

>[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
>
>Would you want to drive a car that broadcast to the car in front of you how
>you feel? Or that switched to classical music, instead of the upbeat rock 'n
>roll you selected, because it decided you were agitated? Or decided to give
>you a longer, scenic route because you didn't seem to be in a hurry?
>
>Detecting that I driver is falling asleep is the one valuable concept
>mentioned, but I don't think tone of voice would be the most effective way
>to determine that. If I'm the only one in the car, I'm not talking. If other
>people are in the car, and I'm talking to them, I'm probably not going to
>fall asleep.
>
>
>
>

14 Apr 2005 - 8:41am
Jack L. Moffett
2005

Pierre Abel wrote:

> Well, I see this project as a typical research project, and from my
> point of view it should not be analyzed in the same way as a industrial
> project...researchers looks for an applications of an emerging
> technology (here the possibility to analyze your mood) in a context of a
> car. they are researchers not really practionners (even they talk about
> putting this car in the market in 3-4 years...)

Perhaps I would have felt differently 7 years ago when I was working on my
masters degree. Obviously there is quite a bit of money, time, and effort
going into this research project, and they apparently believe that these
concepts are desirable in a car, as they do see the car as marketable in 3
or 4 years. I wonder what has led them to this conclusion. I can think of a
half dozen other car-related concepts off the top of my head that would
potentially be more practical. I can also think of a number of other
products in which "mood sensing" would be more useful or desirable.

Yes, it's interesting enough to think about the possibilities, but to
seriously take it as far as they have? I believe they are wasting their
time, and I don't think these will be a features (let alone a popular ones)
in cars four, or even ten years from now.

Jack

Jack L. Moffett
Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.690.2360 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

First, recognize that the Œright¹ requirements
are in principle unknowable by users, customers
and designers at the start.

Devise the design process, and the formal
agreement between designers and customers and users,
to be sensitive to what is learnt by any of the
parties as the design evolves.

- J.C. Jones

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14 Apr 2005 - 10:31am
Ted Booth
2004

On Apr 14, 2005, at 9:41 AM, Jack L. Moffett wrote:
> I believe they are wasting their time, and I don't think these will be
> a features (let alone a popular ones) in cars four, or even ten years
> from now.

I tend to agree that the execution in this case is brute and crude and
not all that desireable. But I'd be careful to dismiss the concept or
bio/emotional feedback as a whole. There are many different ways a
system, in this case a car, could respond to a user's perceived
emotional state.

What about simple things like adjusting the tone and volume of the
seatbelt-not-on and other alerts? Or, if the car senses anxiety in the
user and the doors are unlocked, it could lock the doors. I would think
there are a plethora of small, subtle things that could be changed
based on the perceived emotional state that would improve the user
experience or otherwise delight people.

14 Apr 2005 - 10:59am
Jack L. Moffett
2005

> What about simple things like adjusting the tone and volume of the
> seatbelt-not-on and other alerts? Or, if the car senses anxiety in the
> user and the doors are unlocked, it could lock the doors. I would think
> there are a plethora of small, subtle things that could be changed
> based on the perceived emotional state that would improve the user
> experience or otherwise delight people.

Don't get me wrong, it's not that I don't see any value at all in "mood
sensing." I just find it laughable in the way they are applying it. I even
think it would be a nifty feature in a stereo (whether in a car, in my
house, or in my pocket), but I'd better be able to turn the feature off.
Sometimes I know what I want to listen to, regardless of my mood.

The door locking isn't a bad idea (unless the cause of my panic is inside
the car with me ;). I don't think you're going to get a lot of bang for your
buck in dynamically changing the "your door is ajar" alert, though. Those
things are supposed to get your attention, usually for safety reasons, and
varying the volume or "emotion" of the tone based on your mood isn't
necessarily a good idea. I know the sound my car makes when I'm low on gas.
If it changed, I might not associate it with the same meaning.

Jack

Jack L. Moffett
Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.690.2360 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

To design is much more than simply
to assemble, to order, or even to edit;
it is to add value and meaning,
to illuminate, to simplify, to clarify,
to modify, to dignify, to dramatize,
to persuade, and perhaps even to amuse.

- Paul Rand

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