Scrollbar sculpture

30 Jun 2005 - 7:47am
9 years ago
5 replies
685 reads
Coryndon Luxmoore
2004

Just got this over the transom and thought it might be of interest to
the group. Images of sculpture which are scrollbars in physical space.
Very strange effect when you see the images through the lens of a
computer...

http://www.druh.co.uk/medialounge/exhibitions.html

--Coryndon

--------------------------------------------
Coryndon Luxmoore
Interaction Designer

coryndon (at) luxmoore (dot) com
---------------------------------------------

Comments

30 Jun 2005 - 12:00pm
Tom Ollar
2005

Very cool.

And it makes me think: In actual software, scrollbars add excise. Has anyone
come up with viable alternatives which eliminate the scrollbar?

Tom

----- Original Message -----
From: "Coryndon Luxmoore" <coryndon at luxmoore.com>
To: <discuss at ixdg.org>
Sent: Thursday, June 30, 2005 6:47 AM
Subject: [ID Discuss] Scrollbar sculpture

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> Just got this over the transom and thought it might be of interest to the
> group. Images of sculpture which are scrollbars in physical space. Very
> strange effect when you see the images through the lens of a computer...
>
> http://www.druh.co.uk/medialounge/exhibitions.html
>
> --Coryndon
>
> --------------------------------------------
> Coryndon Luxmoore
> Interaction Designer
>
> coryndon (at) luxmoore (dot) com
> ---------------------------------------------
>
> _______________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
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30 Jun 2005 - 1:35pm
Juan Lanus
2005

On 6/30/05, Tom Ollar <tom at blix.net> wrote:
> ... scrollbars add excise. Has anyone
> come up with viable alternatives which eliminate the scrollbar?

One alternative is Acrobat's little hand.

Other is the mouse wheel.

My users seldom scroll. I (almost) always set "accelerators." One of
the most loathed actions it to scroll Windows lists, both the
drop-down (this is worse) and the alwaya-open kind.
For my users' listboxes (every-day bureaucratic-systems operators) I
always set a kind of accelerator that they give focus to the list and
start typing search text, not necessarily the leftmost characters of
the list items.
This may select the first match or shorten the list, depending on it's
content. For example if it's the canadian provinces list it's OK to
select the firat. The other example would be all cities in a province.
I also do it with grids when ths content is a (rather) long listing.

BTW, one thing I noticed by observing over my user's shoulders is that
they operate scrollbars by clickity-clicking the arrowheads many
times, by the hundreds. Instead of clicking the space between the
slider and the arrow for whole page scrolls.
Do your users scroll pages?

--
Juan Lanus
TECNOSOL
Argentina

30 Jun 2005 - 2:22pm
Tom George
2004

Raskin's Leap/Zoom approach. It presumes, however, that you are already
in the brave new Humane world. (The Humane Interface)

On Jun 30, 2005, at 01:00 PM, Tom Ollar wrote:
>
> And it makes me think: In actual software, scrollbars add excise. Has
> anyone come up with viable alternatives which eliminate the scrollbar?
>

30 Jun 2005 - 8:02pm
Tom Ollar
2005

Yes. Leaps are very nice. A similar techinique could be used for any domain
specific objectives. It seems like the key here is to use the data the user
entered or knows about if at all possible - then they're navigating their
own
stuff.

30 Jun 2005 - 8:21pm
Tom Ollar
2005

>
> BTW, one thing I noticed by observing over my user's shoulders is that
> they operate scrollbars by clickity-clicking the arrowheads many
> times, by the hundreds. Instead of clicking the space between the
> slider and the arrow for whole page scrolls.
>
When you think about the affordance, this makes a lot of sense. Only
"advanced" users would ever think to click the area above or below the
runner.

>
> Do your users scroll pages?
>
Ah yes. Good old-fashioned "Notepad" style scrolling.

Tom

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