info on Button Behavior

11 Sep 2005 - 12:54am
8 years ago
8 replies
353 reads
Jerry John
2004

hey all -
i need some help here! Scenario: ... when in a 'searchlist display page'
that runs into more than one page, and at the last page :- would you disable
the "Next" button? i have a reason to say why not "... that coz I can use
this instance to give the user information why there is no content to
display" ; i was wondering if it would be rude to the user to disabled a
button .... - i'm looking for a good reason to leave the button disabled ...

any takers? ? ?

Jerry John
Interaction Designer
NetContinuum Pvt Ltd

Comments

12 Sep 2005 - 3:15am
Tommy Eskelinen
2004

Hello,
I would not show a next button when there is nothing to show. You could take
away the button and give the cue that there are no more results. For
example:
"showing results 600-650 of 650"
"Page 10 (of 10)"

Best,
Tommy Eskelinen

12 Sep 2005 - 3:22am
Luis Silva
2005

Hello,

Like I said before I would disable the button. If you want to provide the
user the information that there is no more search results left, you could do
it with a mouse over message (ie: When the user tries to click the next
button, a message pops up warning that there is no more pages to see and
why), if the next button is an image you don't even have to use JavaScript
as you can use the 'alt' attribute of the 'img' tag.

Best Regards

Luis Silva

12 Sep 2005 - 1:59pm
Anonymous

Ola Jerry,

I was wondering, and this may sound crazy, but lets say in a hypothetical
situation, I would prefer to have the 'next' button on the last few pages of
a search/result to be named some thing more friendlier, for e.g. 'second
last page', 'whew last page at last'. I have observed, while searching,
people seldom (correct me here) go till the last page of a search result.
For me its kinda stranous 'all those big numbers' for my simple querey. So
may be this techneque migh encourage people to explore atleast the last few
pages. How ever, its always good to have it on the first page.

As for the other question about being rude to the users, the person is
already on the last page of his futil search? What more can you do?

On 9/11/05, Jerry John <jerry at netcontinuum.com> wrote:
>
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> hey all -
> i need some help here! Scenario: ... when in a 'searchlist display page'
> that runs into more than one page, and at the last page :- would you
> disable
> the "Next" button? i have a reason to say why not "... that coz I can use
> this instance to give the user information why there is no content to
> display" ; i was wondering if it would be rude to the user to disabled a
> button .... - i'm looking for a good reason to leave the button disabled
> ...
>
> any takers? ? ?
>
> Jerry John
> Interaction Designer
> NetContinuum Pvt Ltd
>
> _______________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixdg.org
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixdg.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixdg.org
> Home ....................... http://ixdg.org/
>

Vikram Singh,
Not An Interaction Designer Yet
[De-centralizing the central issues]@newMedia
National Institute of Design,
Paldi, Ahmedabad - 7

12 Sep 2005 - 2:27pm
Vassili Bykov
2005

I'd say what's really rude to the user is offering a "next" action only
to show an error message when it's known in advance that the action
cannot succeed.

Not sure relabelling the "next" button for last pages is such a good
idea. It's the same action--why create confusion by changing its name? A
separate label saying "this is the last page" would be a more gentle way
to communicate.

Vikram's Mail wrote:
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
> Ola Jerry,
>
> I was wondering, and this may sound crazy, but lets say in a hypothetical
> situation, I would prefer to have the 'next' button on the last few pages of
> a search/result to be named some thing more friendlier, for e.g. 'second
> last page', 'whew last page at last'. I have observed, while searching,
> people seldom (correct me here) go till the last page of a search result.
> For me its kinda stranous 'all those big numbers' for my simple querey. So
> may be this techneque migh encourage people to explore atleast the last few
> pages. How ever, its always good to have it on the first page.
>
> As for the other question about being rude to the users, the person is
> already on the last page of his futil search? What more can you do?
>
> On 9/11/05, Jerry John <jerry at netcontinuum.com> wrote:
>
>>[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
>>material.]
>>
>>hey all -
>>i need some help here! Scenario: ... when in a 'searchlist display page'
>>that runs into more than one page, and at the last page :- would you
>>disable
>>the "Next" button? i have a reason to say why not "... that coz I can use
>>this instance to give the user information why there is no content to
>>display" ; i was wondering if it would be rude to the user to disabled a
>>button .... - i'm looking for a good reason to leave the button disabled
>>...
>>
>>any takers? ? ?
>>
>>Jerry John
>>Interaction Designer
>>NetContinuum Pvt Ltd
>>
>>_______________________________________________
>>Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
>>To post to this list ....... discuss at ixdg.org
>>(Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixdg.org/
>>Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
>>Questions .................. lists at ixdg.org
>>Home ....................... http://ixdg.org/
>>
>
>
>
>
> Vikram Singh,
> Not An Interaction Designer Yet
> [De-centralizing the central issues]@newMedia
> National Institute of Design,
> Paldi, Ahmedabad - 7
> _______________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixdg.org
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixdg.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixdg.org
> Home ....................... http://ixdg.org/
>
>

12 Sep 2005 - 3:21pm
Rajesh Sidharthan
2005

The nature of the content being displayed, should dictate the way the
pagination mechanism work.
I am scared of mechanisms and standards that fits all needs :)

Here is an example, why I believe that the content should dictate UI
mechanisms.
A friend of mine designed a page that had a list of servers. He was
wondering what kind of delete mechanism he should use. There were three
candidates.
1) A check box next to each list item, so that the user can select
multiple and delete (like Yahoo mail. Delete as much as you want).
2) A delete button next to each list item.
3) No delete button at the list level. However you can delete an item
once you are in the item details page (after making sure you are about
to delete the right server).

In this case, what worked the best was (3) because. Deleting a server is
a very un common activity and there is no need for being able to delete
multiple items at the same time.
Also deleting a server is a very critical task. An admin takes hours to
set up a server. So it is wise to force the deleter to read and
absolutely ensure which server he/she is deleting.

</raj>

Vassili Bykov wrote:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> I'd say what's really rude to the user is offering a "next" action
> only to show an error message when it's known in advance that the
> action cannot succeed.
>
> Not sure relabelling the "next" button for last pages is such a good
> idea. It's the same action--why create confusion by changing its name?
> A separate label saying "this is the last page" would be a more gentle
> way to communicate.
>
> Vikram's Mail wrote:
>
>> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
>> material.]
>>
>> Ola Jerry,
>>
>> I was wondering, and this may sound crazy, but lets say in a
>> hypothetical situation, I would prefer to have the 'next' button on
>> the last few pages of a search/result to be named some thing more
>> friendlier, for e.g. 'second last page', 'whew last page at last'. I
>> have observed, while searching, people seldom (correct me here) go
>> till the last page of a search result. For me its kinda stranous 'all
>> those big numbers' for my simple querey. So may be this techneque
>> migh encourage people to explore atleast the last few pages. How
>> ever, its always good to have it on the first page.
>>
>> As for the other question about being rude to the users, the person
>> is already on the last page of his futil search? What more can you do?
>>
>> On 9/11/05, Jerry John <jerry at netcontinuum.com> wrote:
>>
>>> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
>>> material.]
>>>
>>> hey all -
>>> i need some help here! Scenario: ... when in a 'searchlist display
>>> page'
>>> that runs into more than one page, and at the last page :- would you
>>> disable
>>> the "Next" button? i have a reason to say why not "... that coz I
>>> can use
>>> this instance to give the user information why there is no content to
>>> display" ; i was wondering if it would be rude to the user to
>>> disabled a
>>> button .... - i'm looking for a good reason to leave the button
>>> disabled ...
>>>
>>> any takers? ? ?
>>>
>>> Jerry John
>>> Interaction Designer
>>> NetContinuum Pvt Ltd
>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
>>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixdg.org
>>> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixdg.org/
>>> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
>>> Questions .................. lists at ixdg.org
>>> Home ....................... http://ixdg.org/
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Vikram Singh, Not An Interaction Designer Yet
>> [De-centralizing the central issues]@newMedia
>> National Institute of Design,
>> Paldi, Ahmedabad - 7
>> _______________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixdg.org
>> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixdg.org/
>> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
>> Questions .................. lists at ixdg.org
>> Home ....................... http://ixdg.org/
>>
>>
> _______________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixdg.org
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixdg.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixdg.org
> Home ....................... http://ixdg.org/

13 Sep 2005 - 1:10am
Ryan Nichols
2005

I think you are exactly right. Funny that you mention the delete
scenario. I find that one all the time. People often either use the
multiple delete scenario when users will never need such functionality
or, as you stated, having a TOO quick and easy delete button for an
extremely dangerous and low-usage task. Ugh.

In this case a hypothetical for a last page scenario might be to display
a friendly message such as "We see you are at the last page of your
search results, would you like to _refine your search_ or _enter a new
one_?" somewhere close to the pager.

Ryan Nichols
Apples To Oranges
http://www.apples-to-oranges.com

Rajesh Sidharthan wrote:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> The nature of the content being displayed, should dictate the way the
> pagination mechanism work.
> I am scared of mechanisms and standards that fits all needs :)
>
> Here is an example, why I believe that the content should dictate UI
> mechanisms.
> A friend of mine designed a page that had a list of servers. He was
> wondering what kind of delete mechanism he should use. There were
> three candidates.
> 1) A check box next to each list item, so that the user can select
> multiple and delete (like Yahoo mail. Delete as much as you want).
> 2) A delete button next to each list item.
> 3) No delete button at the list level. However you can delete an item
> once you are in the item details page (after making sure you are about
> to delete the right server).
>
> In this case, what worked the best was (3) because. Deleting a server
> is a very un common activity and there is no need for being able to
> delete multiple items at the same time.
> Also deleting a server is a very critical task. An admin takes hours
> to set up a server. So it is wise to force the deleter to read and
> absolutely ensure which server he/she is deleting.
>
> </raj>
>
>

13 Sep 2005 - 11:24am
Rajesh Sidharthan
2005

I think the greyed out next buttom communicates exactly as you had
mentioned ("We see you are at the last page of your search results,
would you like to _refine your search_ or _enter a new one_?")
Writing an explicit message is a very good thing. But sometimes smart
visual representations communicate better.

There is a restaurant across the street from the place where I live.
Most of the time, I determine if they are open by looking to see if the
lights are on.
Ofcourse they have a large 'Open' or "Close' sign outside. But I dont
care to read :)

The greyed out button = Lights off at the restaurant.
I feel comfortable when I see such real life representations on a UI, so
that I dont have to read.
( By the way, I have pretty good reading skills )

</raj>

Ryan Nichols wrote:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> I think you are exactly right. Funny that you mention the delete
> scenario. I find that one all the time. People often either use the
> multiple delete scenario when users will never need such functionality
> or, as you stated, having a TOO quick and easy delete button for an
> extremely dangerous and low-usage task. Ugh.
>
> In this case a hypothetical for a last page scenario might be to
> display a friendly message such as "We see you are at the last page of
> your search results, would you like to _refine your search_ or _enter
> a new one_?" somewhere close to the pager.
>
> Ryan Nichols
> Apples To Oranges
> http://www.apples-to-oranges.com
>
> Rajesh Sidharthan wrote:
>
>> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
>> material.]
>>
>> The nature of the content being displayed, should dictate the way the
>> pagination mechanism work.
>> I am scared of mechanisms and standards that fits all needs :)
>>
>> Here is an example, why I believe that the content should dictate UI
>> mechanisms.
>> A friend of mine designed a page that had a list of servers. He was
>> wondering what kind of delete mechanism he should use. There were
>> three candidates.
>> 1) A check box next to each list item, so that the user can select
>> multiple and delete (like Yahoo mail. Delete as much as you want).
>> 2) A delete button next to each list item.
>> 3) No delete button at the list level. However you can delete an item
>> once you are in the item details page (after making sure you are
>> about to delete the right server).
>>
>> In this case, what worked the best was (3) because. Deleting a server
>> is a very un common activity and there is no need for being able to
>> delete multiple items at the same time.
>> Also deleting a server is a very critical task. An admin takes hours
>> to set up a server. So it is wise to force the deleter to read and
>> absolutely ensure which server he/she is deleting.
>>
>> </raj>
>>
>>
> _______________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixdg.org
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixdg.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixdg.org
> Home ....................... http://ixdg.org/

13 Sep 2005 - 11:39am
Juan Lanus
2005

Also, the grayed button works as a placeholder.
Should it dissapear then the user would have to rebuild his mental map
of the controls locations and maybe reposition his mouse. This is
annoying and breaks flow.
Sometimes when this happens the [back] button moves where the fainting
[forward] button was and one that's clickity-clicking [forward] might
end up one page before the end. mumbling an opinion about the
designer.
--
Juan

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