Today's New Application for Making Applications...

6 Oct 2005 - 1:25pm
8 years ago
1 reply
649 reads
Dan Saffer
2003

Bunchball!

http://www.bunchball.com/
"You have an idea for a multi-user networked application. Maybe it’s
a game, maybe it’s a new way to share music or photos, maybe it’s
something nobody’s ever thought of. A beautiful little jewel of an
application, you know that you can make something fantastic. But then
you realize that in order to build your application, you need to
figure out user signup, and group creation, and invitations, and
permissions, and chat, and presence, and how to save changes in the
application, and how to figure out who to send those changes to, and
the list goes on. And oh yeah, don’t forget that you need to setup a
server, write server-side code, deal with a database somewhere, worry
about uptime and bandwidth and online file storage, and that list
goes on as well. All of a sudden you realize that your beautiful
little jewel is just the tip of a very large iceberg. You’re going to
spend 90% of your time implementing what’s below the water, out of
the user’s sight, and 10% of your time building a great application.

Bunchball gives you the iceberg. You just provide the tip. So now you
can spend your time doing what you wanted to do in the first place,
which is to create a great application.”

I created an interaction designers group for all of us to use and
experiment with. The invite code is: 0215c274c56649c989797d7558b17ec4

Dan

Dan Saffer
Sr. Interaction Designer, Adaptive Path
http://www.adaptivepath.com
http://www.odannyboy.com

Comments

10 Oct 2005 - 12:37am
Austin Govella
2004

Bunchball is headed in the right direction.

Written for developers, Ruby on Rails still requires extensive coding
to make it work. Automating *some* of the tedious "iceberg"
programming is a *good* thing, but they still make you do the rest.

Django goes a step further, automating more of the iceberg work.

But what we really need is a framework created for designers and
end-users that manages ontologies and lets us map those to both common
and custom interaction design patterns.

Sounds far-fetched, but we're halfway there now.

--
Austin Govella
Thinking & Making: IA, UX, and IxD
http://thinkingandmaking.com
austin.govella at gmail.com

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