Left Nav, Right Nav. What Nav, Should It Have?

27 Oct 2005 - 6:57pm
8 years ago
18 replies
1467 reads
David Hatch
2005

Hi. My name is David and I like right navs (better than left navs).
Thank you for hearing my confession.

Why I like right nav...
Content in the main body of the page takes center stage. The body
content is the first thing you see when the page loads. Yes the nav is
always there but its not in your face. Its there when you need it but
doesn't seem to compete with the body content as much.

Right Nav Examples

* Macromedia.com (where I work) (Ex:
http://www.macromedia.com/software/flex/ )
* Sun.com (Ex:
http://www.sun.com/servers/index.jsp?cat=Sun%20Fire%20Entry-level%20Serv
ers&tab=3)

Why part of me worries the nav should be on the left...
My nagging internal voice keeps saying: Industry standards. Most
corporate sites have nav on the left (and my site, macromedia.com, is a
corporate site). Differing from this standard introduces an unnecessary
obstacle to users' learned behavior. Go with the flow. Leverage the
standard, leverage the user expectation.... <and on and on...>

Left Nav Examples

* Adobe (Ex:
http://www.adobe.com/products/photoshop/main.html?lid=//products//PS+Pdw
n)
* Microsoft (Ex:
http://www.microsoft.com/products/info/product.aspx?view=22&pcid=c199c1d
1-26e3-4bf9-bd45-7198b44562fb&type=ovr)
* IBM (Ex: http://www-306.ibm.com/software/awdtools/apl/)

Info bits I know about:
J. Kalbach, T. Bosenick (April 2003)
<http://jodi.tamu.edu/Articles/v04/i01/Kalbach/> say: The hypothesis
that the left-hand navigation would perform significantly faster than
the right-hand navigation was not supported.
Steve Outing and Laura Ruel (September 2004)
<http://www.poynterextra.org/eyetrack2004/navigation.htm> say: The
performance of right-nav placement was very similar to left.
A boxes and arrows discussion
<http://www.boxesandarrows.com/archives/challenging_the_status_quo_audi_
redesigned.php?page=discuss> on rt navs
IASlash discussion <http://www.iaslash.org/node/7350> on the Kalbach
article

What do you think?
In terms of overall user experience, what side do you like for
navigation? Do you share the concern of my inner voice saying: go with
the standard?

---

David Hatch
Chief Information Architect
macromedia.com

Comments

27 Oct 2005 - 9:24pm
andersr
2005

2005/10/27, David Hatch <dhatch at macromedia.com>:
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]

> What do you think?
> In terms of overall user experience, what side do you like for
> navigation? Do you share the concern of my inner voice saying: go with
> the standard?

This reminds me of an extensive discussion on another not-to-be-named
list about an equally important topic - should toilet rolls be
inserted such that the paper is pulled from on top or from the bottom?
While my inner voice tells me it should be pulled from the top, I
have to confess that I secretly flip the roll and pull it from the
bottom. Yes, I know the W3C recommendation is for it to be pulled
from on top, but that just feels too corporate. At the same time,
after doing extensive usability testing (we observed about 100 users
doing their business in the middle of our usability labs), we found
that user preference really is very mixed in this area - some users
would completely ignore interface boundaries and rip the whole roll
out if it's casing and do a free-style paper pull. (They were
apparently the same people who also like to apply their own CSS styles
on sites with navigation or styling not to their liking.) But overall,
what we heard from users was that they really don't give a [bleep] as
long as they can do their business and get out of there, which would
apply equally well to the equally important question of left or right
nav.

-Anders

27 Oct 2005 - 9:20pm
Donna Maurer
2003

My inner voice puts it like this:
- most sites have an information hierarchy of some type, an t is
often represented by navigation
- content is someway down the hierarchy
- visual hierarchies are good, they help us to make sense of what
we are looking at and how things fit together
- visual processing on the web is very basically left top to right
bottom
- matching the visual hierarchy with the information hierarchy is
a good thing.

I'm not fixed on this and will do whatever suits the
site/information under question, but I really don't feel right
with a deeper-than-one-level nav bar on the right.

Donna

On Thu Oct 27 16:57:02 PDT 2005, David Hatch
<dhatch at macromedia.com> wrote:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> Hi. My name is David and I like right navs (better than left
> navs).
> Thank you for hearing my confession. Why I like right nav...
> Content in the main body of the page takes center stage. The body
> content is the first thing you see when the page loads. Yes the
> nav is
> always there but its not in your face. Its there when you need it
> but
> doesn't seem to compete with the body content as much. > What do
> you think?
> In terms of overall user experience, what side do you like for
> navigation? Do you share the concern of my inner voice saying: go
> with
> the standard?

27 Oct 2005 - 9:29pm
Ted Booth
2004

Hi David,

I love your post, particularly the first paragraph. Way to take on the
sacred cows!

In general I think sticking with the "industry standard" is useful when
you don't want to innovate that particular aspect of a product (because
you're innovating somewhere else and there is such a thing as too much
innovation), or because you're playing catch up (because your product
is so behind that just meeting a competitive baseline is progress).

Left, right, up, down, all together. I like them all, they all play a
roll. As an example:

http://www.eyebeam.org/

The point behind this nav is that it reinforces the multi-prong aspect
of Eyebeam's organizational charter - that was the idea when we were
designing it. If it's a little challenging to those 'left sided nav'
users then all the better - it's an arts organization that wants to
push the edge.

On Oct 27, 2005, at 7:57 PM, David Hatch wrote:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> Hi. My name is David and I like right navs (better than left navs).
> Thank you for hearing my confession.
>
> Why I like right nav...
> Content in the main body of the page takes center stage. The body
> content is the first thing you see when the page loads. Yes the nav is
> always there but its not in your face. Its there when you need it but
> doesn't seem to compete with the body content as much.
>
> Right Nav Examples
>
> * Macromedia.com (where I work) (Ex:
> http://www.macromedia.com/software/flex/ )
> * Sun.com (Ex:
> http://www.sun.com/servers/index.jsp?cat=Sun%20Fire%20Entry-
> level%20Serv
> ers&tab=3)
>
>
> Why part of me worries the nav should be on the left...
> My nagging internal voice keeps saying: Industry standards. Most
> corporate sites have nav on the left (and my site, macromedia.com, is a
> corporate site). Differing from this standard introduces an unnecessary
> obstacle to users' learned behavior. Go with the flow. Leverage the
> standard, leverage the user expectation.... <and on and on...>
>
> Left Nav Examples
>
> * Adobe (Ex:
> http://www.adobe.com/products/photoshop/main.html?lid=//products//
> PS+Pdw
> n)
> * Microsoft (Ex:
> http://www.microsoft.com/products/info/product.aspx?
> view=22&pcid=c199c1d
> 1-26e3-4bf9-bd45-7198b44562fb&type=ovr)
> * IBM (Ex: http://www-306.ibm.com/software/awdtools/apl/)
>
>
> Info bits I know about:
> J. Kalbach, T. Bosenick (April 2003)
> <http://jodi.tamu.edu/Articles/v04/i01/Kalbach/> say: The hypothesis
> that the left-hand navigation would perform significantly faster than
> the right-hand navigation was not supported.
> Steve Outing and Laura Ruel (September 2004)
> <http://www.poynterextra.org/eyetrack2004/navigation.htm> say: The
> performance of right-nav placement was very similar to left.
> A boxes and arrows discussion
> <http://www.boxesandarrows.com/archives/
> challenging_the_status_quo_audi_
> redesigned.php?page=discuss> on rt navs
> IASlash discussion <http://www.iaslash.org/node/7350> on the Kalbach
> article
>
>
> What do you think?
> In terms of overall user experience, what side do you like for
> navigation? Do you share the concern of my inner voice saying: go with
> the standard?
>
>
>
>
> ---
>
> David Hatch
> Chief Information Architect
> macromedia.com
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org

27 Oct 2005 - 9:30pm
Vassili Bykov
2005

David Hatch wrote:
> Info bits I know about:
> J. Kalbach, T. Bosenick (April 2003)
> <http://jodi.tamu.edu/Articles/v04/i01/Kalbach/> say: The hypothesis
> that the left-hand navigation would perform significantly faster than
> the right-hand navigation was not supported.
> Steve Outing and Laura Ruel (September 2004)
> <http://www.poynterextra.org/eyetrack2004/navigation.htm> say: The
> performance of right-nav placement was very similar to left.
> A boxes and arrows discussion
> <http://www.boxesandarrows.com/archives/challenging_the_status_quo_audi_
> redesigned.php?page=discuss> on rt navs
> IASlash discussion <http://www.iaslash.org/node/7350> on the Kalbach
> article

Here is another info bit

Oulasvirta, A., Kärkkäinen, L., & Laarni, J. (2005). Expectations and
memory in link search.
http://www.hiit.fi/uerg/publications/Memory_in_Navigation_AO_LK_JL.pdf

> What do you think?
> In terms of overall user experience, what side do you like for
> navigation? Do you share the concern of my inner voice saying: go with
> the standard?

As someone said, the nice thing about standards is there are so many to
choose from. I don't have a favorite side, I think it depends on the
role of navigation in the typical task flow on a particular site.

For example, right side navigation works great for blogs, and is used
there quite frequently from what I see. In that context, content is king
and the primary task is reading the current posts while scrolling down
the page. Navigation such as links to archives and other blogs is
clearly secondary.

On the other hand, in situations where the experience is all about
navigation and the mental model of the site is some sort of a
compartmentalized space, I'd expect that users would find left side
navigation more familiar because of existing stereotypes.

As for any standard, I'd first of all ask myself if it's applied in a
context just like mine, and not worry too much about not following it if
it isn't.

--
Vassili Bykov <vbykov at cincom.com>
tools technical lead, VisualWorks engineering

27 Oct 2005 - 8:57pm
Ash Donaldson
2005

On 28/10/05 9:57 AM, "David Hatch" <dhatch at macromedia.com> wrote:
> What do you think?
> In terms of overall user experience, what side do you like for
> navigation? Do you share the concern of my inner voice saying: go with
> the standard?

Two words. "Population stereotype".
A population stereotype is a learned cultural norm. In the world of the
web, left-hand navigation gained enough popularity (from CNET originally,
then all the others that followed suit) that the common behaviour is for
user gaze to fall to the left when navigating. Even though it may be more
efficient to have the navigation on the right (Fitt¹s law would apply for
those not using scroll wheels on their mice), and people will most likely
find the navigation if it¹s placed there, it¹s an addition of unnecessary
cognitive load which can hamper the Œtransparent experience¹.

Of course, that¹s not to say that left-hand navigation is an absolute. Just
as underlined, blue text to represent a hyperlink was a population
stereotype, the constant exposure to a mixed use of representations
(underlined, dashed underlined, or no underline) and colours has seen that
behaviour shift to users identifying any text that is a contrasting colour
to the words that surround it as a hyperlink. At first this inconsistency
frustrated users, but eventually it evolved a new population stereotype.

The same may happen with navigation placement, but there is a question you
may wish to ask yourself. Working with such a popular site as Macromedia,
you have a certain amount of influence, so do you want to be one of the
pioneers that adds that little bit of cognitive processing that can make for
a slightly more frustrating experience (and hope that enough other large
sites, and then smaller sites will follow suit), or would you prefer to play
the safe card and wait for others to lead the way until a new population
stereotype has been established?

Cheers,

Ash Donaldson, Senior Experience Architect

Experts in Human Centred Design

T +61 2 9908 1077 F +61 2 9908 3443 M 0414 55 9996

www.different.com.au

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27 Oct 2005 - 9:53pm
Nathan Vincent
2004

<quote>
This reminds me of an extensive discussion on another not-to-be-named
list about an equally important topic - should toilet rolls be inserted
such that the paper is pulled from on top or from the bottom?
</quote>

Really? Can you e-mail me directly and tell me what that list was,
please? I feel very strongly that toilet paper should be pulled from the
top...

...and that it largely depends on the nature of the page design, and the
content/function of the site, as to whether or not a right menu would be
suitable or appropriate.

To expand: if the page content is such that it will *pull* the user into
the site, and for the most part they won't need the menu, then sticking
it on the right is fine, or even better. If however there are a lot of
dead ends, and the user will likely have to rely on the menu to get
around (and even to provide them with their mental model of the site),
then left navigation could be more appropriate, because in this case the
importance of the navigation is elevated.

But this is just my opinion. In the past I've used both methods, for
those reasons.

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This e-mail contains PRIVILEGED AND CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION intended solely for the use of the addressee(s). If you are not the intended recipient, please notify the sender by e-mail and delete the original message. Further, you are not to copy, disclose, or distribute this e-mail or its contents to any other person and any such actions are unlawful. This e-mail may contain viruses. Infosys has taken every reasonable precaution to minimize this risk, but is not liable for any damage you may sustain as a result of any virus in this e-mail. You should carry out your own virus checks before opening the e-mail or attachment. Infosys reserves the right to monitor and review the content of all messages sent to or from this e-mail address. Messages sent to or from this e-mail address may be stored on the Infosys e-mail system.
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27 Oct 2005 - 10:40pm
Katie Albers
2005

At 10:24 PM -0400 10/27/05, Anders Ramsay wrote:
>[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
>2005/10/27, David Hatch <dhatch at macromedia.com>:
>> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
>> What do you think?
>> In terms of overall user experience, what side do you like for
>> navigation? Do you share the concern of my inner voice saying: go with

Forget preferences. Forget Fitts Law. Forget all the other
rationales. Navigation on the right disappears in many cases if the
window is resized. If it's important, put it on the left.

Katie

27 Oct 2005 - 10:48pm
Vishal Subraman...
2005

Katie- You beat me to it by 4 mins...I was about to write the same.
Agree with u 100%

Notice how the macromedia site breaks on resizing the window. If the
content is on the right, parts of it would be on the screen giving us
an idea that there something missing in the picture. With the nav, one
could miss it entirely.

Vishal

Katie Albers wrote:
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
> At 10:24 PM -0400 10/27/05, Anders Ramsay wrote:
>
>>[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>>
>>2005/10/27, David Hatch <dhatch at macromedia.com>:
>>
>>> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>>
>>> What do you think?
>>> In terms of overall user experience, what side do you like for
>>> navigation? Do you share the concern of my inner voice saying: go with
>
>
> Forget preferences. Forget Fitts Law. Forget all the other
> rationales. Navigation on the right disappears in many cases if the
> window is resized. If it's important, put it on the left.
>
> Katie
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
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>

27 Oct 2005 - 10:49pm
James Melzer
2004

Just to throw a wrench in the works...

There is some consensus (but let's not call it an industry standard)
that on very large sites you have the following pattern: global
corporate nav across the top, major section and local nav on the left,
and more local nav and related materials on the right. You see this
pattern a lot on a whole range of content-rich sites. A good example
is in IT product vendor sites, where this pattern is something of a
standard - every company has virtually identical global nav (products,
solutions, partners, yada yada); then their left nav follows a
predictable pattern (within the products section, major categories on
the left, and product names as local nav nested within each category);
finally on the right you find material related to the page content -
the white papers, the product spec sheets and the industry vertical
links. Some examples are below. No surprises.

But here's the trick (I think) - if your content area is focused and
your audience is focused, then you can skip the left nav completely
and just use the right nav. Now, here is the part I consider crucial -
you can only do this if what's in the right nav includes 'right nav'
kinds of things - more detail about what's on the page or related
material nearby. So your Macromedia Flex example follows this model.
You could list other products in the same line on the left, but you
didn't. But with or without a left nav, the things you put in right
nav remain unchanged.

It's likely to be what your users will expect and where they will expect it.

~ James

BEA/Plumtree combines top, left and right nav
http://plumtree.com/products/analytics/

SRA/NetOwl combines left and right nav
http://netowl.com/products/extractor.html

EMC/Documentum combines top, left and right nav
http://documentum.com/products/glossary/content_intelligence_services.htm

On 10/27/05, Nathan Vincent <Nathan_Vincent at infosys.com> wrote:
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
>
> <quote>
> This reminds me of an extensive discussion on another not-to-be-named
> list about an equally important topic - should toilet rolls be inserted
> such that the paper is pulled from on top or from the bottom?
> </quote>
>
> Really? Can you e-mail me directly and tell me what that list was,
> please? I feel very strongly that toilet paper should be pulled from the
> top...
>
> ...and that it largely depends on the nature of the page design, and the
> content/function of the site, as to whether or not a right menu would be
> suitable or appropriate.
>
> To expand: if the page content is such that it will *pull* the user into
> the site, and for the most part they won't need the menu, then sticking
> it on the right is fine, or even better. If however there are a lot of
> dead ends, and the user will likely have to rely on the menu to get
> around (and even to provide them with their mental model of the site),
> then left navigation could be more appropriate, because in this case the
> importance of the navigation is elevated.
>
> But this is just my opinion. In the past I've used both methods, for
> those reasons.
>
> **************** CAUTION - Disclaimer *****************
> This e-mail contains PRIVILEGED AND CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION intended solely for the use of the addressee(s). If you are not the intended recipient, please notify the sender by e-mail and delete the original message. Further, you are not to copy, disclose, or distribute this e-mail or its contents to any other person and any such actions are unlawful. This e-mail may contain viruses. Infosys has taken every reasonable precaution to minimize this risk, but is not liable for any damage you may sustain as a result of any virus in this e-mail. You should carry out your own virus checks before opening the e-mail or attachment. Infosys reserves the right to monitor and review the content of all messages sent to or from this e-mail address. Messages sent to or from this e-mail address may be stored on the Infosys e-mail system.
> ***INFOSYS******** End of Disclaimer ********INFOSYS***
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>

--
--
James Melzer

27 Oct 2005 - 11:33pm
Ash Donaldson
2005

On 28/10/05 1:49 PM, "James Melzer" <jamesmelzer at gmail.com> wrote:
> Just to throw a wrench in the works...
[..]
> But here's the trick (I think) - if your content area is focused and
> your audience is focused, then you can skip the left nav completely
> and just use the right nav. Now, here is the part I consider crucial -
> you can only do this if what's in the right nav includes 'right nav'
> kinds of things - more detail about what's on the page or related
> material nearby.

Just to pull that wrench out of the works...

As with everything in this industry there is no silver bullet, no single
answer. The old adage of ³it depends² can be extrapolated in this case to
³it depends on the purpose and context of use.² Expected items in the right
column have traditionally been loosely related materials or links on content
heavy sites such as blogs, but more commonly, it has been skyscrapers
(banner ads in their vertical form) on commercial sites and search engines.

Ads were placed here for a number of reasons ­ not least of which (as has
been pointed out) is users losing nothing of real value if the window is
resized in fixed-width sites. I¹m sure that the behaviour described as
Œbanner blindness¹ hasn¹t done anything to help the right-column.

Websites sometimes flaunt conventions for inane reasons such as designers
thinking Œusers will learn that¹s how we do things¹. That¹s rather
egocentric, considering that when task-focussed, people will most commonly
deep-link into your site from a search engine, get the information they want
as fast as possible and be gone again ­ jumping through a number of sites in
a few minutes. Just because you spend so much time with your website,
doesn¹t mean your users will. Breaking established population stereotypes
simply changes the landscape (the last 4 websites had nav here, where is it
on this one?), slows them down by adding that cognitive load and leaves a
negative impression.

Match your user¹s expectations, support their goals and have a business
model that exploits these behaviours and you¹ll do well.

If you¹re building a blog with relative sizing, then sure, use that right
column to your heart¹s content. If you¹re building a commercial website,
I¹d weigh up the consequences first.

Cheers,

Ash Donaldson, Senior Experience Architect

Experts in Human Centred Design

T +61 2 9908 1077 F +61 2 9908 3443 M 0414 55 9996

www.different.com.au

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28 Oct 2005 - 1:38am
Steve Baty
2009

On 28/10/05, Ash Donaldson <ash.donaldson at different.com.au> wrote:[Please
voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]

If you¹re building a blog with relative sizing, then sure, use that right
column to your heart¹s content. If you¹re building a commercial website,
I¹d weigh up the consequences first.

Speaking from a business perspective, I'd want to be sure on the results,
particularly for a corporate site. If putting the nav on the left hand side
makes navigation a no-brainer and results in a higher rate of 'success'
(however that's measured) on the site, the stick to the canonical,
stereotypical form and be creative elsewhere.

If the result will be the same whether the nav is on the left or the right,
then I'd be a lot more sanguine about where you position that element.

As Ash points out quite clearly, there is a real danger that a negative
experience is the result of such 'tinkering' with established norms, and
that is typically bad news for the business.

Steve Baty
Senior Analyst, Red Square
www.redsquare.com <http://www.redsquare.com>

28 Oct 2005 - 2:25am
Jim Kalbach
2005

Hi,

I agree with Anders. Users just want to do their business and get out of
there. In hindsight, this whole discussin isn't necessary.

That said, for the Audi sites we found that people weren't there to
navigate, but look at the content. And our client wanted users to look at
the content too (image that). Not reported in our study is some fairly
strong evidence that the page content got much more attention when the
navigation was on the right. And having the navigation on the right didn't
reduce findability of that content at all.

Also note that part of the Audi brand is being "innovative." Though moving
the navigation from left to right isn't as radical as some folks think (even
people on this list), being different was OK for this project. Mercedes and
BMW both had a left-hand navigation at the time as well.

Finally, we solved the issue with the navigation dissappearing on the right.
Our approach was admittedly overcomplicated. But if you just design a
flexible page, it's pretty easy to do.

So, for the Audi site we:
- Aligned user goals with business goals (looking at content first, then
navigating)
- Reflected a core brand value in the overall design of the site
(innovation)
- Solved any technical issue of the navigation dissappearing (flexible
layout)

I question the notion of left-hand navigations being standard. They're not.
And it's not necessarily the best design to have the navigation on the left.
Let's stop propagating design myths.

The point of our study was that "it depends." But we did user testing to
validate our designs before launching to mitigate any risk in usage. Design
for the situation and be explicit about why you've made the decision you've
made. But always test with users.

Cheers,
Jim Kalbach

28 Oct 2005 - 4:22am
Omri Eliav
2004

What about the content? No one talk about it.
Where IT should be?
How easy it to read when the Nav is to the left (or right) of it?

Personally, in scale of importance, I prefer to get the current
content in most easy way (understand, read, grasp ...), second, the
tool to go to other pages (content).
Now you know :-) I like Right Nav.

Is there research from that point of view?

On Oct 28, 2005, at 1:57 AM, David Hatch wrote:

> Why I like right nav...
> Content in the main body of the page takes center stage. The body
> content is the first thing you see when the page loads. Yes the nav is
> always there but its not in your face. Its there when you need it but
> doesn't seem to compete with the body content as much.

_________
Omri Eliav
guiguy|::| - Interaction Design
omri at guiguy.co.il

28 Oct 2005 - 7:19am
Rafa Lopez Callejon
2006

As far as I can remember they did a test at Audi website. Users
find left navigation faster, but after the first pages, people use
right navigation more.

In my company, we did a similar test. People have often the cursor
near the scroll bar, and they have to move the mouse
less if the navigation is on the right. Right navigation was easier.

I can think of more examples of right navigation
A9
Plenty of blogs
Maybe I´m mistaken, but usability.gov mention that is better to put
navigation on the right
Best

On 10/28/05, Omri Eliav <omri at guiguy.co.il> wrote:
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
> What about the content? No one talk about it.
> Where IT should be?
> How easy it to read when the Nav is to the left (or right) of it?
>
> Personally, in scale of importance, I prefer to get the current
> content in most easy way (understand, read, grasp ...), second, the
> tool to go to other pages (content).
> Now you know :-) I like Right Nav.
>
> Is there research from that point of view?
>
>
>
> On Oct 28, 2005, at 1:57 AM, David Hatch wrote:
>
> > Why I like right nav...
> > Content in the main body of the page takes center stage. The body
> > content is the first thing you see when the page loads. Yes the nav is
> > always there but its not in your face. Its there when you need it but
> > doesn't seem to compete with the body content as much.
>
> _________
> Omri Eliav
> guiguy|::| - Interaction Design
> omri at guiguy.co.il
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
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--
Rafa López Callejón
lopezcallejon at gmail.com
+34 606 43 52 95

28 Oct 2005 - 9:26am
penguinstorm
2005

On Oct-27-2005, at 8:40 PM, Katie Albers wrote:

> Navigation on the right disappears in many cases if the
> window is resized. If it's important, put it on the left.

This is an overgeneralization. Navigation that is on the right in a
fixed size window can disappear.

I used to - several years ago - argue the same point by explaining
that the browser window started mapping from the top left; the
farther away we got from the top left corner, the less precision we
had in how it was controlled.

Stylesheets and absolute positioning change this; we more or less
have control over the entire page. I think this rationale isn't all
that valid, as long as the page is planned properly.

(I shove non-important content out to a fourth column on my personal
home page that extends beyond 800 pixels, but still plan on being
read an 800-ish pixel window.)
--
Scott Nelson
skot at penguinstorm.com
http://www.penguinstorm.com/

skype. skot.nelson

31 Oct 2005 - 2:16am
Stewart Dean
2004

hi,

Before looking at others responces my view and experiences is very much the
same as yours. Assuming western left to right, top to bottom use then the
navigation is more visible if the navigation is on the left. Without
thinking I recently put navigation on the right for a small content based
site I was working on whilst all the big nasty sites tends to have the
navigation on the left.

If the content can tell the story and is the focus then why break that up by
navigation on the left. Also navigation often doesnt tell much of a story as
it's restricted to a word or two - why not let the main body do that job and
then have the right hand nav as 'if that fails use this' - that is use
contextual navigation rather than hirachical navigation. There's always top
horizontal navigation as well (for example apple).

Stewart Dean

31 Oct 2005 - 11:58am
Todd Warfel
2003

In many cases? Surely, you jest. If you know you want to put the
navigation on the right side, and you know your target audiences'
browser window size, then navigation won't disappear when the window
is resized.

And the "Well, once in a blue moon" argument simply isn't a way to
design.

On Oct 27, 2005, at 11:40 PM, Katie Albers wrote:

> Navigation on the right disappears in many cases if the
> window is resized. If it's important, put it on the left.

Cheers!

Todd R. Warfel
Partner, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | making products & services easier to use
--------------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (607) 339-9640
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
--------------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

31 Oct 2005 - 11:59am
Todd Warfel
2003

And how often does this happen (in the real world)?

On Oct 27, 2005, at 11:48 PM, Vishal iyer wrote:

> Notice how the macromedia site breaks on resizing the window. If the
> content is on the right, parts of it would be on the screen giving us
> an idea that there something missing in the picture. With the nav, one
> could miss it entirely.

Cheers!

Todd R. Warfel
Partner, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | making products & services easier to use
--------------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (607) 339-9640
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
--------------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

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