New shopping interaction

12 Jan 2006 - 1:36pm
8 years ago
8 replies
765 reads
Susan Farrell
2004

http://www.panic.com/goods
drag and drop shopping
one page checkout

I'd like to tweak the checkout some (e.g.: "ship to different
address?") etc., but I think this is a big leap forward because it's
all visible all the time, and it looks easy and fun to use.

Kudos to Panic.com. They make good OS X software too, in Portland OR.

Susan

Comments

12 Jan 2006 - 1:51pm
Noah Pan
2006

This does seem like a fun interface, though I can see a potential problem
when attempting to select a quantity and size. If the user just drags the
product to the shopping cart without changing either of those options, the
item is added to the cart with the default options (in this case quantity 1
and size S). In the shopping cart, I don't see a way to change the quantity
or size if you made a mistake (you have to drag the item out of the cart to
remove it, find the item again, change the options, then drag it back to the
cart or click on the plus sign to add it). Allowing the user to change
options in the cart itself would be fairly easy to do, though, and I like
the fact that the shopping cart is ever--present.

Noah

On 1/12/06, Susan Farrell <farrell at nngroup.com> wrote:
>
> http://www.panic.com/goods
> drag and drop shopping
> one page checkout
>

12 Jan 2006 - 2:43pm
Austin Govella
2004

On 1/12/06, Noah Pan <noah.a.pan at gmail.com> wrote:
> This does seem like a fun interface, though I can see a potential problem
> when attempting to select a quantity and size. If the user just drags the
> product to the shopping cart without changing either of those options, the
> item is added to the cart with the default options (in this case quantity 1
> and size S).

Maybe adding "1 small t-shirt: $24.95" would clarify thigns more?

--
Austin Govella
Thinking & Making: IA, UX, and IxD
http://thinkingandmaking.com
austin.govella at gmail.com

12 Jan 2006 - 3:26pm
Susan Farrell
2004

I thought the same when I made that mistake, and I tried to
right-click the shirt to change the options. Luckily you can change
these on the checkout page, but there it's too late to prevent the
anxiety about the problem.

Susan

On 1/12/06, Noah Pan <noah.a.pan at gmail.com> wrote:
> This does seem like a fun interface, though I can see a potential problem
> when attempting to select a quantity and size. If the user just drags the
> product to the shopping cart without changing either of those options, the
> item is added to the cart with the default options (in this case quantity 1
> and size S).

14 Jan 2006 - 9:50am
jbellis
2005

I feel that this is more than just a fun, new thing, it is a design that
will ultimately prevail. It is also a fascinating demonstration of our
craft's and our industries logisitics:

1) On the one hand, it represents simply applying a trend in UI design that
has been unstoppable: "docking" more and more controls. Whether you call
them palettes, docked panels, or non-modal windows, this is all they've
done. (That is: There was a time when, in graphics editors, you had to open
and close a dialog for every color change. Now the color swatches stay on
the screen all the time if you want... docked.)

2) Yet they thought of it first, so they still deserve tremendous credit.

3) And why did it take 11 (?) years of the web of the web to dock a shopping
cart... in an industry that we think moves fast? One reason shows up if you
look under the hood. It's not meant as a slight on MS, just a comment on
complexity and industry tradeoffs:

<!-- This bizarre chunk of magic IE CSS conditional code is an attempt
to get IE to display our floating cart div properly. Hopefully, future
versions
of IE will natively understand position: fixed, and this can go away.
Source: http://devnull.tagsoup.com/fixed/ -->

4) If we teach highschool programmers when to dock things, we will have
extracted the right moral from this thread and served our craft well. Now as
long as Panic doesn't think that the mere notion of docking itself (as
opposed to their code) is protected by their patent claim...
<!-- PanicGoods Product Page v1.0 -->
<!-- (C) 2005 Panic, Inc. / Cabel Sasser -->
<!-- Patent Pending -->

www.jackBellis.com, www.UsabilityInstitute.com

----- Original Message -----
From: "Susan Farrell" <farrell at nngroup.com>
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] New shopping interaction

> http://www.panic.com/goods
> drag and drop shopping
> one page checkout

14 Jan 2006 - 1:09pm
Coryndon Luxmoore
2004

Jack said

> 3) And why did it take 11 (?) years of the web of the web to dock a
> shopping
> cart... in an industry that we think moves fast?

I don't know how you are defining a "docked" shopping cart. There
have been many flavors of persistent and always available shopping
carts, lists, etc over the years on the web. I worked on one for an
office supply company back in '99. These have all the functionality
of what you describe as a "docked" cart except the 'new' interaction
of item drag and drop.

So I am guessing that it only took ~5 years for this kind of behavior
to start showing up. It is hard to remember but it was over these
same five years that the web was evolving from essentially a static
data retrieval tool to one that truly supported two way interactive
communication. Still pretty fast IMHO.

-Coryndon

--------------------------------------------
Coryndon Luxmoore
Interaction Designer

coryndon (at) luxmoore (dot) com
---------------------------------------------

14 Jan 2006 - 2:59pm
Baldo
2005

> I don't know how you are defining a "docked" shopping cart. There
> have been many flavors of persistent and always available shopping
> carts, lists, etc over the years on the web. I worked on one for an
> office supply company back in '99.

like this (very basic) cart:
http://www.sanbaldo.com/wordpress/wp-content/carrello.html

14 Jan 2006 - 5:25pm
Coryndon Luxmoore
2004

On Jan 14, 2006, at 4:54 PM, jackbellis.com wrote:
> I understand, but the prominence of the site you are describing is
> only as high as "an office supply company?" That's my point.

Jack you may want to rethink that statement..

http://216.239.51.104/search?
q=cache:O__q23mHAj4J:www.internetretailer.com/article.asp%3Fid%3D12109
+Staples+Office+Supplies+Annual+web+revenue&hl=en&client=safari

"And despite the fact that just four office supply companies made it
into the Top 300 retail web sites, they account for a stunning 13% of
total web sales of the group and comprise the third largest
merchandise category on the Internet, according to the Top 300 Guide.
Indeed, as a measure of how well-suited office supplies are on the
web, the two largest office supply chains—Office Depot Inc. and
Staples Inc.—have the third and fifth largest retail web sites
respectively."

Staples had sales of 14.4 billion in 2004 with web sales of 3 billion...

--Coryndon

--------------------------------------------
Coryndon Luxmoore
Interaction Designer

coryndon (at) luxmoore (dot) com
---------------------------------------------

14 Jan 2006 - 9:52pm
Chris McLay
2005

On 14/01/2006, at 10:50 PM, jackbellis.com wrote:
> 3) And why did it take 11 (?) years of the web of the web to dock a
> shopping
> cart... in an industry that we think moves fast? One reason shows
> up if you
> look under the hood. It's not meant as a slight on MS, just a
> comment on
> complexity and industry tradeoffs:

Getty Images has had a similar system for some time. It's not drag
and drop, but it has time to iron out many of the issues already
raised about the panic version. For example, when selecting an image
you just add the image to your cart or light box, and then when you
decide to buy it you choose specifics about size and format etc.

--
Chris McLay …// designer

Mobile 041 123 9190
Email chris at eeoh.com.au
iChat & AIM chrismclay at mac.com
Web http://www.eeoh.com.au/chris/

Syndicate content Get the feed