Registration UI

17 Jan 2006 - 10:16am
8 years ago
5 replies
347 reads
Ganesh Gayakwad
2005

Hi All,

I have a question about user registration process. It is about gaming portal
where any user can register and his/her account is opened. The user can then
deposit the money online in the account and play games. Current registration
process has four steps requiring server trip and page refresh after every
page. The interaction is something like this:

Page 1 - {Nickname, First Name, Last name, email and acceptance of terms
check box} Continue >>

Page 2 - { Username, Password, preferred currency, Date of Birth} Continue
>>

Secure Pages warning browser dialogue box. OK >>

Page 3 - {Nationality, Country, Address and Phone Number} Submit >>

Secure Pages warning browser dialogue box. OK >>

Page 4 - {Registration success message} Deposit

Page 4 Pop Up Window - {Online Payment}

My question - Is it better to have a single long registration page instead
of split pages as above. The single page, although scrollable, can give all
the information required at once and users will not have to wait for each
page download. As a result, the entire page might have to be a secure page.
I appreciate your views and references if any.

Thanks a regards,

Ganesh Gayakwad

UID Group,

Mahindra British Telecom, India.

Ph. 91-20- 5601 8414

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Comments

17 Jan 2006 - 11:53am
Todd Warfel
2003

Just a quick question, why wouldn't you have this on one screen?

On Jan 17, 2006, at 10:16 AM, Ganesh Gayakwad wrote:

> My question - Is it better to have a single long registration page
> instead
> of split pages as above. The single page, although scrollable, can
> give all
> the information required at once and users will not have to wait
> for each
> page download. As a result, the entire page might have to be a
> secure page.
> I appreciate your views and references if any.

Cheers!

Todd R. Warfel
Partner, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | designing and usability consulting
--------------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (607) 339-9640
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
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In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

17 Jan 2006 - 12:57pm
Christopher Fahey
2005

> Just a quick question, why wouldn't you have this on one screen?

One possible reason for breaking up a registration would be to capture
potential customers' names and email addresses in a simple user information
step, before they might later decide to quit the process upon second
thoughts about the price, commitment, etc. While this doesn't make much
sense from the user's point of view, marketing folks often insist that this
makes good business sense, and they often have solid data to back them up.

-Cf

Christopher Fahey
____________________________
Behavior
http://www.behaviordesign.com

17 Jan 2006 - 9:05pm
andersr
2005

2006/1/17, Ganesh Gayakwad <gganesh at mahindrabt.com>:
> My question - Is it better to have a single long registration page instead
> of split pages as above. The single page, although scrollable, can give all
> the information required at once and users will not have to wait for each
> page download. As a result, the entire page might have to be a secure page.
> I appreciate your views and references if any.

Sometimes a single page makes sense, sometimes not...

* Long forms, especially if not well designed, can appear overwhelming to users.

* If form values are not being stored on the fly (at least locally)
and/or you've got a session-based model, you might frustrate users who
are slow filling out a long form, or users who may need to step away
from the computer to get some info required in the form, only to
return to discover that their session has ended and their data has
been lost.

*In some cases, it makes sense to just ask the user for the bare
minimum, e.g. username, pwd, email address, at which point they're on
record in the system, and then request all additional information
separately.

*If you can assume that you'll be able to do dom-level refresh (e.g.
with ajax), you can feed the user the whole form in bite-size pieces
without requring page-refresh.

*All this might be moot depending on the underlying architecture - the
registration/e-commerce package being used may require following
specific processes, such as registering users by first by sending them
an authorization key, before being able to accept additional
information, or being required to go to a new page to enter payment
information.

-Anders

18 Jan 2006 - 1:23am
bhakti भक्ति
2006

Sometimes a single page makes sense, sometimes not...

* Long forms, especially if not well designed, can appear overwhelming to
users.

Design may provide a visual differenciation (if required demarkation) while
displaying the the form element by classifying them into sub categories,
where in the User will not get a feel on the overwhelming input expected,
also will relate the importance of the expected input section-by-section
(eg. - contact information > Next > personal information > Account specific
information etc...)

User can them then hide/unhide these so-called categories to enter further
inputs, though this maynot be mandatory for the user.

My 2 cents
Bhakti

18 Jan 2006 - 10:51am
Alex Tarling
2006

It's not clear from your description, but I guess from other gaming
registration systems I have worked on that it is not mandatory to
deposit money when you first register. Most gaming systems have a
play-for-free mode to build player commitment.

If this is true for your case I would suggest keeping the
deposit/online payments screen separate at least. Best to get people
signed-up and fully engaged with your product before prompting them
for payment if you can afford to do that.

Alex

--
Alex Tarling
User Experience Consultant
T: +44 (0) 7776 233201
E: alex.tarling at gmail.com

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