Re: HCI vs. Interaction Design vs. Human Factors

25 Feb 2004 - 5:18pm
10 years ago
1 reply
3072 reads
Christian Simon
2003

> on 2/24/04 19:56, id at ourbrisbane.com at id at ourbrisbane.com wrote:
> HCI looks at the computer and human in synonymous
> terms,
> ignoring environmental, physical and sociological variables.
>
>> On Feb 18, 2004, at 11:19 PM, Dan Saffer wrote:
>>> I feel that interaction design has a broader (some would argue less
>>> focused) scope, ...
> hmmm...sounds an awful lot like human factors actually... ;)

Human Computer Interaction
Is associated with Interaction
Design where interaction design
Includes additional factors
beyond computer interaction
and sounds like Human
Factors?

(>_<)

Human factors, for me, brings to
Mind the physical therapy
Side of humans interacting with
Technology. Of the two, the human
Is a far better adaptor. I find this
A comforting place to part from
The field.

x

_________________________________________________________________
Christian Simon | www.christiansimon.com | San Francisco Bay Area
_________________________________________________________________

Comments

29 Feb 2004 - 8:35pm
id at ourbrisba...
2004

Quoting Christian Simon <christiansimon at pacbell.net>:
> Human Computer Interaction
> Is associated with Interaction
> Design where interaction design
> Includes additional factors
> beyond computer interaction
> and sounds like Human Factors?
>
> (>_<)
>
> Human factors, for me, brings to
> Mind the physical therapy
> Side of humans interacting with
> Technology. Of the two, the human
> Is a far better adaptor. I find this
> A comforting place to part from
> The field.

Perhaps I did not articulate myself well enough. In explaining his view of
Interaction Design, Dan related an almost textbook definition of Human Factors -
a field of study that outdates HCI by a few decades.

Dan wrote:
> I feel that interaction design has a broader (some would argue less
> focused) scope, looking at interactions not only between humans and
> computers via interfaces, but also human-human, human-environment, and
> human-system interactions as well.

Human Factors is actually the study (both qualitative and quantitative) of
humans interacting with systems (where a system may be a piece of technology,
other humans, an environment, or a combination of these), and the application of
this knowledge to the subsequent design or re-design of said systems.

Chapanis (1985) defined it as follows:
"Human factors discovers and applies information about human behavior,
abilities, limitations, and other characteristics to the design of tools,
machines, systems, tasks, jobs, and environments for productive, safe,
comfortable, and effective human use."

Best regards,

Ash Donaldson
User Experience Designer

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