In case you missed it: A Recap of Our NYC IxDA Event with Adam Greenfield

10 Mar 2006 - 7:47pm
8 years ago
1 reply
581 reads
Ashley LaFrenais
2005

Hello fellow IxDA'ers,

We had a fantastic evening last night featuring Adam Greenfield
paired with some wine, snacks, and thought-provoking discussions
about the future of ubiquitous computing. Thanks to those of you who
attended! If you have any thoughts to add to my summary, please do...

Adam discussed the idea of Everyware--computing that's out there in
everyday life where people don't even know that they're using it or
it's use doesn't require much attention or explicit action. Some
examples he gave include:

1) BodyMedia's Senseware - wearable technology that monitors
physiological and lifestyle information, such as energy expenditure,
caloric intake, sleep, and adherence to exercise and healthy
lifestyle programs (http://www.bodymedia.com/main.jsp)

2) Sensacell Tiles - tiles that allow users to interact with a
surface via light - these can be positioned underneath a translucent
surface in groups to make applications ranging from an interactive
coffee table (shown below) to luminescent walls (http://
www.inhabitat.com/entry_102.php)

3) Smart CCTV camera systems with facial recognition in London

4) Panopticon Prison Surveillance System (http://cartome.org/
panopticon1.htm)

5) Octopus Card in Hong Kong - a multi-modal smart card system being
expanded for use with transportation systems, telephones, photo
booths and more (http://www.octopuscards.com and http://
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octopus_Card) also being implemented in London
(http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/3121652.stm)

The point was that everyware is not something of the future. It's
already out there. And changes in critical enabling technology, such
as the introduction of IPv6 which adds enough IP addresses for every
possible device you can think of, will only make Everyware more
prevalent. So, if this is the case, then as designers we must begin
to change our thinking about:

- How we define interactions: Our current design process and
technologies require a certain degree of explicitness in defining
interactions that just won't mesh with human and social interactions
that aren't explicit. Web pages have clear "states." What will states
look like for everyware??

- What are the value propositions from a user's perspective: Can we
make a compelling and clearly-articulated case for why this
technology adds value?

- What deliverables we create: Our current deliverables (e.g.,
wireframes, site maps) can't really account for 3-D space,
interactions of more than one person, ecological interactions, space
and time, and gestural interactions. So we might have to investigate
deliverables from other fields such as architecture (blueprints),
film and animation (storyboards), choreography (Labanotation and
Benesh notation), and UML modeling (use case diagrams). Or we need
something entirely new.

- How we can continue to be an advocate for and protect the human
right of our users: What guidelines can we help create and establish
around this technology? For example: The safety of the user is of
primary importance; Information/data being collected must be fully
and clearly disclosed to the user and there should always be
voluntary compliance.

Adam's key takeaway: This is a great time to be an interaction
designer - there will be a big need for good designers to create
meaningful, usable, and safe everyware. So step up to the plate!

You can read more about Everyware in Adam's new book Everyware: The
Dawning Age of Ubiquitous Computing (http://tinyurl.com/ejbk8).

Other resources/interesting projects/people Adam mentioned:
- Critical Cartography Project (http://ttt.media.mit.edu/research/
cartog.html)

- Mimi Ito (check out her book on Personal, Portable, Pedestrian and
her blog at http://www.itofisher.com/mito/)

- How Buildings Learn (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/
0140139966/103-5569055-1640605?v=glance&n=283155)

- Minority Report (movie with Tom Cruise - you can see great examples
of gestural interfaces)

Finally, we will have a podcast of this event available soon. If
you're interested email nyc (at) ixda (dot) org for more information.

Ashley LaFrenais
NYC IxDA Event Coordinator

Comments

10 Mar 2006 - 7:48pm
Ashley LaFrenais
2005

Hello fellow IxDA'ers,

We had a fantastic evening last night featuring Adam Greenfield
paired with some wine, snacks, and thought-provoking discussions
about the future of ubiquitous computing. Thanks to those of you who
attended! If you have any thoughts to add to my summary, please do...

Adam discussed the idea of Everyware--computing that's out there in
everyday life where people don't even know that they're using it or
it's use doesn't require much attention or explicit action. Some
examples he gave include:

1) BodyMedia's Senseware - wearable technology that monitors
physiological and lifestyle information, such as energy expenditure,
caloric intake, sleep, and adherence to exercise and healthy
lifestyle programs (http://www.bodymedia.com/main.jsp)

2) Sensacell Tiles - tiles that allow users to interact with a
surface via light - these can be positioned underneath a translucent
surface in groups to make applications ranging from an interactive
coffee table (shown below) to luminescent walls (http://
www.inhabitat.com/entry_102.php)

3) Smart CCTV camera systems with facial recognition in London

4) Panopticon Prison Surveillance System (http://cartome.org/
panopticon1.htm)

5) Octopus Card in Hong Kong - a multi-modal smart card system being
expanded for use with transportation systems, telephones, photo
booths and more (http://www.octopuscards.com and http://
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octopus_Card) also being implemented in London
(http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/3121652.stm)

The point was that everyware is not something of the future. It's
already out there. And changes in critical enabling technology, such
as the introduction of IPv6 which adds enough IP addresses for every
possible device you can think of, will only make Everyware more
prevalent. So, if this is the case, then as designers we must begin
to change our thinking about:

- How we define interactions: Our current design process and
technologies require a certain degree of explicitness in defining
interactions that just won't mesh with human and social interactions
that aren't explicit. Web pages have clear "states." What will states
look like for everyware??

- What are the value propositions from a user's perspective: Can we
make a compelling and clearly-articulated case for why this
technology adds value?

- What deliverables we create: Our current deliverables (e.g.,
wireframes, site maps) can't really account for 3-D space,
interactions of more than one person, ecological interactions, space
and time, and gestural interactions. So we might have to investigate
deliverables from other fields such as architecture (blueprints),
film and animation (storyboards), choreography (Labanotation and
Benesh notation), and UML modeling (use case diagrams). Or we need
something entirely new.

- How we can continue to be an advocate for and protect the human
right of our users: What guidelines can we help create and establish
around this technology? For example: The safety of the user is of
primary importance; Information/data being collected must be fully
and clearly disclosed to the user and there should always be
voluntary compliance.

Adam's key takeaway: This is a great time to be an interaction
designer - there will be a big need for good designers to create
meaningful, usable, and safe everyware. So step up to the plate!

You can read more about Everyware in Adam's new book Everyware: The
Dawning Age of Ubiquitous Computing (http://tinyurl.com/ejbk8).

Other resources/interesting projects/people Adam mentioned:
- Critical Cartography Project (http://ttt.media.mit.edu/research/
cartog.html)

- Mimi Ito (check out her book on Personal, Portable, Pedestrian and
her blog at http://www.itofisher.com/mito/)

- How Buildings Learn (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/
0140139966/103-5569055-1640605?v=glance&n=283155)

- Minority Report (movie with Tom Cruise - you can see great examples
of gestural interfaces)

Finally, we will have a podcast of this event available soon. If
you're interested email nyc (at) ixda (dot) org for more information.

Ashley LaFrenais
NYC IxDA Event Coordinator

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