Don Norman on the Aesthetics of IxD (well, I think so)

13 Apr 2006 - 3:59pm
8 years ago
2 replies
930 reads
Dave Malouf
2005

http://www.jnd.org/dn.mss/emotionallycentered.html

Don here talks about how the behavior of an application can increase the
visceral emotional response and thus increase engagement. To me this is
a prime and well articulated example of the aesthetics of IxD.

-- dave

Comments

13 Apr 2006 - 4:31pm
Mike Beltzner
2004

On 4/13/06, Dave Heller <dave at ixda.org> wrote:
> Don here talks about how the behavior of an application can increase the
> visceral emotional response and thus increase engagement. To me this is
> a prime and well articulated example of the aesthetics of IxD.

Very much in line with his "Emotional Design" (well, execept for the
bit where he went off for a few chapters about robots ...) which
stressed the idea of designing an item such that it effectively takes
on a personality (which could be "cute", "helpful", "efficient",
"slick", etc.)

I find that it's transitions, animations, and subtle cues in support
of tasks (like the WordPress / Basecamp background colour flash to
illustrate the location of a recent change or status message) which
end up getting this across.

Anyone else got examples of easy ways to make an application or device
more personable? Or when not to (level of difficulty: no references to
Clippit!).

cheers,
mike

--
/ mike beltzner / user experience lead / mozilla corporation /

13 Apr 2006 - 4:37pm
Dave Malouf
2005

Mike Beltzner wrote:
> Anyone else got examples of easy ways to make an application or device
> more personable? Or when not to (level of difficulty: no references to
> Clippit!).
My favorite examples are in Mac OS X:
1. The bounce of items opening on the dock
2. The genie in the bottle animation when minimizing or restoring
to/from the dock

These are borrowed by MS Office on the mac when the format panel moves
from the toolbar to the side of the doc/sheet/presentation you are
working on.

What I like about these is that the animation is delightful, but also
utilitarian. They help you remember the cause/effect and reinforce to
the user where to go to turn off/on that item again later.

In Windows, minimizing to the task bar also has a re-enforcing
animation, but it is very direct and doesn't "entertain" and so doesn't
have the same emotional response.

The one element that Don didn't mention is the use of sound to enhance
this experience even further. Something that AJAX apps don't do well,
but Flash based RIAs have easier access to.

-- dave

Syndicate content Get the feed