What is interaction?

29 Apr 2006 - 6:04pm
7 years ago
10 replies
720 reads
codiuk
2006

I started a course on MA Design For Interaction in September 2005.
Coming from a design background, I was interested to experiment and
understand how design can clarify and define the role of interactive
media especially online. At the same time I started working on an
online fashion project with a programmer for technical support.
Together we were determine to try and change the way clothes are
catalogued online. Working within the fashion industry we were still
restricted on what we could do so we decided to try out two methods
the old style of displaying items and a new and innovative way of
displaying items. This is what we developed, click on link:
http://gussy.co.uk/styler.php?table=108,109,120,112,113,115,117,121,122,123,124,125,126,128,129,131,&selection=112,131#table=108,109,120,112,113,115,117,121,122,123,124,125,126,128,129,131,&selection=115,131,

The idea is that you can drag and drop items just as you would when
putting and taking off clothes in the shops, mirroring a physical
experience. What do you think? Does it work?
Is this an interactive media?

Comments

29 Apr 2006 - 7:25pm
Dave Malouf
2005

Hiya,

What I don't understand about your question scenario, is that you said you
are dedicated to changing the way people shop for clothes online, but you
didn't say what was wrong with it. Unless you define a problem, your
interactive solution will lack a viable direction. Now I'm not saying you
don't have a problem that needs to be solved, but I don't know what problem
you are trying to solve so it is hard for us to evaluate your attemtp at a
solution.

-- dave

29 Apr 2006 - 7:35pm
Mark Kot
2006

gussy.co.uk wrote:

> The idea is that you can drag and drop items just as you would when
> putting and taking off clothes in the shops, mirroring a physical
> experience. What do you think?

Very cool! I think it is an excellent app.

>> Does it work?

Yes, Mozilla 1.7.12 on Mac OSX 10.4.5. I did notice if you put
the hooded vest (position 1) on the model, and then try to put
the shirt in position 7, it does not update. You need to put the
vest away to see the shirt.

Also, maybe you may want to include a head on the model? It's a
little odd to see her neck chopped off at a 45 degree angle... :)

> Is this an interactive media?

Well, I interacted with it, and it is media, so my vote would be yes.

Mark

29 Apr 2006 - 7:45pm
codiuk
2006

I wanted to clarify my question that I posed earlier about displaying
clothes online.
Working for an online fashion store, we are in the process of updating
the website and catalogue and I wanted to know what the community
thinks about how clothes are currently displayed online. The route
most stores takes is spend a huge amount on models and photography and
I'm not saying that it isn't worth spending money on but what i would
like to know is whether just displaying items on beautiful models is
enough in engaging people to visit and enjoy the experience. Can good
photography make an interactive media? Can just taking a fashion
photography enough for pushing the boundaries of what the Internet
could offer online fashion or can ideas like this work?
http://gussy.co.uk/styler.php?table=108,109,120,112,113,115,117,121,122,123,124,125,126,128,129,131,&selection=112,131#table=108,109,120,112,113,115,117,121,122,123,124,125,126,128,129,131,&selection=115,131,

29 Apr 2006 - 9:21pm
Larry Tesler
2004

The term "interactive media" can be used to describe anything from a
web page with some pictures and links to 3-D multi-player games.

Visit http://www.landsend.com/ and click "My Virtual Model". It does
not use drag and drop but it allows you to dress the mannequin and
see front, side and rear views. Note that most of the Lands End site
uses traditional fashion photography.

J.C. Penney used to offer a similar feature. See
http://www.professionaljeweler.com/archives/features/site/2000/090500site.html.
I don't think they do any more. Perhaps it did not work well for them.

Other apparel sites let you change the color of a garment on a model.

Pushing boundaries sometimes results in higher sales. Sometimes it doesn't.

Larry Tesler

At 1:45 AM +0100 4/30/06, gussy.co.uk wrote:
>[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
>what i would
>like to know is whether just displaying items on beautiful models is
>enough in engaging people to visit and enjoy the experience. Can good
>photography make an interactive media? Can just taking a fashion
>photography enough for pushing the boundaries of what the Internet
>could offer online fashion or can ideas like this work?

30 Apr 2006 - 2:11am
mojofat
2004

I thought this was good work... especially for something that
essentially sounded like a school project. And I have also seen this
sort of interaction model used in a few other places as well, although
I am personally wary of purchasing something as non-standard as
clothing online (save for the occasional t-shirt, which is even fraught
with problems concerning size). At any rate, I was thinking during
dinner tonight that it would be cool to offer different sized
models/mannequins. That way, a user could choose a model that was
perhaps closer to their actual size and see what the clothes looked
like then. The belly shirt that looks hot on the size 0 model may give
a customer second thoughts when viewed on something closer to her own
reality. I haven't seen this option before.

-al

On Apr 29, 2006, at 7:21 PM, Larry Tesler wrote:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> The term "interactive media" can be used to describe anything from a
> web page with some pictures and links to 3-D multi-player games.
>
> Visit http://www.landsend.com/ and click "My Virtual Model". It does
> not use drag and drop but it allows you to dress the mannequin and
> see front, side and rear views. Note that most of the Lands End site
> uses traditional fashion photography.
>
> J.C. Penney used to offer a similar feature. See
> http://www.professionaljeweler.com/archives/features/site/2000/
> 090500site.html.
> I don't think they do any more. Perhaps it did not work well for them.
>
> Other apparel sites let you change the color of a garment on a model.
>
> Pushing boundaries sometimes results in higher sales. Sometimes it
> doesn't.
>
> Larry Tesler
>
> At 1:45 AM +0100 4/30/06, gussy.co.uk wrote:
>> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
>> material.]
>>
>> what i would
>> like to know is whether just displaying items on beautiful models is
>> enough in engaging people to visit and enjoy the experience. Can good
>> photography make an interactive media? Can just taking a fashion
>> photography enough for pushing the boundaries of what the Internet
>> could offer online fashion or can ideas like this work?
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>
>

29 Apr 2006 - 11:50pm
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

It's a little awkward how the price box keeps turning gray while
updating, but other than that, it's excellent. Very nice work.

-r-

On 4/29/06, gussy. co. uk <codiuk at gmail.com> wrote:
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
> I started a course on MA Design For Interaction in September 2005.
> Coming from a design background, I was interested to experiment and
> understand how design can clarify and define the role of interactive
> media especially online. At the same time I started working on an
> online fashion project with a programmer for technical support.
> Together we were determine to try and change the way clothes are
> catalogued online. Working within the fashion industry we were still
> restricted on what we could do so we decided to try out two methods
> the old style of displaying items and a new and innovative way of
> displaying items. This is what we developed, click on link:
> http://gussy.co.uk/styler.php?table=108,109,120,112,113,115,117,121,122,123,124,125,126,128,129,131,&selection=112,131#table=108,109,120,112,113,115,117,121,122,123,124,125,126,128,129,131,&selection=115,131,
>
> The idea is that you can drag and drop items just as you would when
> putting and taking off clothes in the shops, mirroring a physical
> experience. What do you think? Does it work?
> Is this an interactive media?
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>

30 Apr 2006 - 7:50am
Dave Malouf
2005

> Can good
> photography make an interactive media? Can just taking a fashion
> photography enough for pushing the boundaries of what the Internet
> could offer online fashion or can ideas like this work?

In and of itself, a photograph, good or bad is not interactive media.
Add a single hyperlink to the system for either getting to the image or
leaving the image, or adding or removing, or otherwise manipulating the
space that the image is in and you have an interactive system.

But the real question should be is it the RIGHT solution for what you are
doing.

Your solution offers some pieces that would interest people who are
shopping. The one thing it gives them is not just a shopping cart, but also
the ability to see in that shopping cart what matches and how to build an
outfit. This is a very important part of the offline shopping experience
that you are bringing online, which many online catalog based clothing
vendors don't do well.

That said, Photography is an incredibly important part of creating a fashion
experience. As someone said, the dicapitated person didn't work, and quite
honestly the underwear laiden woman as a base was also a little odd of an
experience, too. But fashion photography is important to the total
experience of shopping and while I agree with you that it shouldn't be the
only element, having an engaging story through media means a lot to the
total experience of shopping on or offline. It may not improve "usability"
but it will be a method of communication that strikes a difference.

-- dave

30 Apr 2006 - 1:33pm
Oleh Kovalchuke
2006

>can ideas like this work?

What you are offering is online version of cut out paper dolls game. It is
more engaging experience than watching photographs and will appeal to the
same people who used to dress up those cut out dolls.

Problems with current implementation and several suggestions:

- "Available Items" area is too big for smaller monitors - jeans will
not be visible. Put "There is more" indicator if user needs to scroll.
Consider constraints of future expansion of the catalogue due to company
growth. In the later case you might use this kind of page as an engaging
interaction for exclusive selection of "featured" items.
- Consider highlighting mutually nonexclusive items in the "Available
items" area.
- Consider using single click for item selection/removal instead of
drug-n-drop.
- Consider adding "Save This Outfit" option for side by side
comparison of two or more different ensembles.
- Disable "Buy Now" when no items are selected (for mannequin in
underwear).
- Present "Buy Now" action as visibly clickable button. Place it under
the list of selected items.
- Show both item description and price without animated rotation.

--
Oleh Kovalchuke
Interaction Design is Design of Time
http://www.tangospring.com/IxDtopicWhatIsInteractionDesign.htm

On 4/29/06, gussy. co. uk <codiuk at gmail.com> wrote:
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
material.]
>
> I wanted to clarify my question that I posed earlier about displaying
> clothes online.
> Working for an online fashion store, we are in the process of updating
> the website and catalogue and I wanted to know what the community
> thinks about how clothes are currently displayed online. The route
> most stores takes is spend a huge amount on models and photography and
> I'm not saying that it isn't worth spending money on but what i would
> like to know is whether just displaying items on beautiful models is
> enough in engaging people to visit and enjoy the experience. Can good
> photography make an interactive media? Can just taking a fashion
> photography enough for pushing the boundaries of what the Internet
> could offer online fashion or can ideas like this work?
>
http://gussy.co.uk/styler.php?table=108,109,120,112,113,115,117,121,122,123,124,125,126,128,129,131,&selection=112,131#table=108,109,120,112,113,115,117,121,122,123,124,125,126,128,129,131,&selection=115,131
,
> ________________________________________________________________

30 Apr 2006 - 3:20pm
Larry Tesler
2004

I agree it was good work and should have said so.

Multi-player games often provide tools to dress avatars. That is a
similar problem but obviously easier than dressing a real person who
is visiting a shopping site.

Larry

At 12:11 AM -0700 4/30/06, Allen Smith wrote:
>I thought this was good work... especially for something that
>essentially sounded like a school project. And I have also seen
>this sort of interaction model used in a few other places as well,
>although I am personally wary of purchasing something as
>non-standard as clothing online (save for the occasional t-shirt,
>which is even fraught with problems concerning size). At any rate,
>I was thinking during dinner tonight that it would be cool to offer
>different sized models/mannequins. That way, a user could choose a
>model that was perhaps closer to their actual size and see what the
>clothes looked like then. The belly shirt that looks hot on the
>size 0 model may give a customer second thoughts when viewed on
>something closer to her own reality. I haven't seen this option
>before.

2 May 2006 - 6:42pm
Frederik Fix
2006

Hi,
I'm the programmer behind gussy.co.uk and Jack (the starter of this
thread) pointed me to this discussion. First of all thank for all the
thoughtful comments, positive and negative. Some of the points raised
were concerns for me as well which is why I have been reworking the
whole site.

But before I go on let me state the problem we (at gussy) are trying
to solve:
Looking at most online fashion stores I struck me that they are
selling fashion just like others are selling electronics. They are
mostly missing the opportunities that the interactive, global
networks affords and thereby distort the way fashion is consumed in
the offline world. In particular they miss the combinatory aspects of
garments, something that I hope the stylist can improve on. On the
other hand the social aspects of shopping are missing. (A feature to
address this is in the works and will be out before the end of the
month...) In response to the other examples of this listed I found
them to be too slow and somewhat awkward because they are not
sufficiently integrated with the website.

Now I have put up a preview of the rework at http://
friends.gussy.co.uk/stylist. And I would appreciate your feedback on
the changes I have made. In particular I would like to hear your
thoughts on the lens (top box on the left) that allows you to browse
the catalogue and allows you to put items onto the table (the box
below it). Do you think the experience is intuitive? The reason I
split the interface into two box is that I expect people to browse
the catalogue and select a handful of items they like which they can
then switch between once on the table. Does this division sound
reasonable to you?
Another aspect that I would appreciate some feedback on is the redone
zoom interface. Look at http://friends.gussy.co.uk/products/show/2
for example. By moving the mouse over the main image a zoomed portion
of the image appears next to the cursor. Do you like this interface?
Robert raised the point that the way the shopping box is grayed out
when changing items is awkward. Do others share this view? If so how
do you best show the user that the system is doing a network
transaction that can take between 100 ms and 1 s, during which the
user has to wait?

Thanks in advance for any responses,

Frederik Fix

Syndicate content Get the feed