browser window size stats/studies ?

5 May 2006 - 12:54pm
8 years ago
10 replies
48324 reads
Johan Sjostrand
2005

There's obviously tons of material with data about users screen
resolution - but what about browser resolution?

Windows default - maximized.
OSX default - not maximized. (almost positive)

I think it's pretty safe to assume that most users have maximized window
but it would still be interesting to see if there's anything out there
that would back it up.

Best
Johan

Comments

11 May 2006 - 8:15am
David
2005

[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
material.]
------------
"I think it's pretty safe to assume that most users have maximized
window but it would still be interesting to see if there's anything out
there that would back it up."
------------

Johan, I asked a similar question on another board and a few have shared
their findings. With the help of another that was kind enough to share
their method, I set up a set a JavaScript on our Web pages to load an
image if either of these returns true: "document.body.clientWidth <
1024" and "screen.width >= 1024".

I am interested in knowing how many of our users with a display
resolution >= 1024 have their browser window maximized. So far the
numbers have been fairly consistent: 86% of our users with a display
resolution of 1024 or larger do not have their browser window maximized.

> David Jaeger, M.Ed.
> Florida Gulf Coast University
> Director, Web, Multimedia & Publication Services
> Instructional Technology & Broadcast Services
> Broadcast Building, Office #15
> 239.590-2315

11 May 2006 - 9:10am
Adrian Howard
2005

On 11 May 2006, at 14:15, Jaeger, David wrote:
[snip]
> I am interested in knowing how many of our users with a display
> resolution >= 1024 have their browser window maximized. So far the
> numbers have been fairly consistent: 86% of our users with a display
> resolution of 1024 or larger do not have their browser window
> maximized.
[snip]

It's also dependant on the platform. For example almost no Mac users
will have their windows set to their maximum screen resolution since
there isn't an "easy" way of doing it.

Adrian

11 May 2006 - 1:03pm
Gerard
2005

Hej,

My experience is that there is no easy way in windows either, at least
not for the common user! People stick to the resolution that comes with
the installation of IE.

Regards,
Gerard

Adrian Howard schreef:
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
>
> On 11 May 2006, at 14:15, Jaeger, David wrote:
> [snip]
>
>> I am interested in knowing how many of our users with a display
>> resolution >= 1024 have their browser window maximized. So far the
>> numbers have been fairly consistent: 86% of our users with a display
>> resolution of 1024 or larger do not have their browser window
>> maximized.
>>
> [snip]
>
> It's also dependant on the platform. For example almost no Mac users
> will have their windows set to their maximum screen resolution since
> there isn't an "easy" way of doing it.
>
> Adrian
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>
>
>

11 May 2006 - 1:58pm
Gerard
2005

Hej Jack,

Could be that people don't understand the maximize button. I just
observe that a lot of "common users" stick to what they get, even if
this is a window of about 200*200 pixels. I've seen people surf with a
window like that! If one thinks about it: does that second button from
the right top "afford" maximization? It has to be learned I think, like
most icons.

Regards,
Gerard

jackbellis.com schreef:
> Gerard,
> Is your point that users don't understand the Maximize button in the upper
> right corner of Windows apps?
> Thanks,
> www.jackbellis.com, www.workathomewednesday.com
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Gerard" <gos at xs4all.nl>
>
>
>> My experience is that there is no easy way in windows either, at least
>> not for the common user! People stick to the resolution that comes with
>> the installation of IE.
>>
>> Regards,
>> Gerard
>>
>>
>>
> 86% of our users with a display
>
>>>> resolution of 1024 or larger do not have their browser window
>>>> maximized.
>>>>
>
>
>

11 May 2006 - 4:37pm
Vassili Bykov
2005

Adrian Howard wrote:

> It's also dependant on the platform. For example almost no Mac users
> will have their windows set to their maximum screen resolution since
> there isn't an "easy" way of doing it.

I am a Mac user and I don't see that as the primary reason. I think the
main reason is the prevalence on the Mac of large displays with wide
aspect ratio. For most applications, a window of size and proportion
equal to a typical Mac screen is simply unnecessarily wide.

I actually find the "easy" maximizing Firefox provides on clicking the
Zoom button an annoyance (in contrast to Safari which maximizes the
window to match the *content* rather than the screen). If a typical web
page these days is designed for a screen 1024 or 800 pixels wide, when
a browser is resized to twice that--and even a mid-range Mac laptop
will allow you to go to 1440--you either get text with with 200+
characters on a line or a window that's mostly empty all the while
obscuring everything else you had on the screen.

--Vassili

11 May 2006 - 11:23pm
cfmdesigns
2004

From: Vassili Bykov <vbykov at cincom.com>
>
>Adrian Howard wrote:
>
>> It's also dependant on the platform. For example almost no Mac users
>> will have their windows set to their maximum screen resolution since
>> there isn't an "easy" way of doing it.
>
>I am a Mac user and I don't see that as the primary reason. I think the
>main reason is the prevalence on the Mac of large displays with wide
>aspect ratio. For most applications, a window of size and proportion
>equal to a typical Mac screen is simply unnecessarily wide.

I'm a Mac user and neither I nor any other Mac users I know outside
of pro photo and design people have those extra wide screens. I
think they are a lot less prevalent than you might assume. (Of
course, in the end, what sort of users are in the set being examined
tells the tale best.)

There are two other obvious reasons I see for Mac users to not have
full width browser windows, however. First, anyone who uses the Dock
on the right or the left and doesn't auto-hide it cannot use full
width windows; they can't infringe in the Dock's space. And second,
the inherent nature of the Mac has the Finder as an app than can be
brought to the front by clicking past open windows and onto the
desktop. Mac users in general (in my experience) are more apt to
make use of overlapping app windows than Windows users are. (Indeed,
I use Windows at work and Mac at home. At work, my browser [Firefox]
is full width unless I need to be swapping between apps; at home, my
browser [Safari] is almost never full width.)
--

----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Jim Drew Seattle, WA cfmdesigns at earthlink.net
http://home.earthlink.net/~rubberize/Weblog/index.html (Update: 5/2)
(Subject: Movie Commentary: I, Robot)

12 May 2006 - 11:51am
Travis Chillemi
2006

We are looking for the exact same answers. I stumbled upon the following
site and it seems like a promising idea. The data collected is outdated, so
we plan to implement our own approach. It is essentially a javascript that
measures the viewable window size and writes it to a server log. We plan to
able to measure this information and store it in a database, skipping the
log. If this script works, we may include on all of our projects until we
establish some credible numbers.

http://www.chunkysoup.net/advanced/bugged/

Of curious note: 31- 42% of users are browsing at 'full screen'.
Travis Chillemi

On 5/11/06, Jim Drew / CFM Designs <cfmdesigns at earthlink.net> wrote:
>
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> From: Vassili Bykov <vbykov at cincom.com>
> >
> >Adrian Howard wrote:
> >
> >> It's also dependant on the platform. For example almost no Mac users
> >> will have their windows set to their maximum screen resolution since
> >> there isn't an "easy" way of doing it.
> >
> >I am a Mac user and I don't see that as the primary reason. I think the
> >main reason is the prevalence on the Mac of large displays with wide
> >aspect ratio. For most applications, a window of size and proportion
> >equal to a typical Mac screen is simply unnecessarily wide.
>
> I'm a Mac user and neither I nor any other Mac users I know outside
> of pro photo and design people have those extra wide screens. I
> think they are a lot less prevalent than you might assume. (Of
> course, in the end, what sort of users are in the set being examined
> tells the tale best.)
>
> There are two other obvious reasons I see for Mac users to not have
> full width browser windows, however. First, anyone who uses the Dock
> on the right or the left and doesn't auto-hide it cannot use full
> width windows; they can't infringe in the Dock's space. And second,
> the inherent nature of the Mac has the Finder as an app than can be
> brought to the front by clicking past open windows and onto the
> desktop. Mac users in general (in my experience) are more apt to
> make use of overlapping app windows than Windows users are. (Indeed,
> I use Windows at work and Mac at home. At work, my browser [Firefox]
> is full width unless I need to be swapping between apps; at home, my
> browser [Safari] is almost never full width.)
> --
>
>
> ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
> Jim Drew Seattle, WA
> cfmdesigns at earthlink.net
> http://home.earthlink.net/~rubberize/Weblog/index.html (Update: 5/2)
> (Subject: Movie Commentary: I, Robot)
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>

--
Travis Chillemi
Web Developer
1080media CITT/ATEL

13 May 2006 - 9:59am
Håkan Reis
2006

Actually, I did a highly non-scientific study of this. I went through
20-30 computers at work and checked their screen settings when surfing.I
turns out the size of most browsers stopped at about 800 x 800. The
width of 800 seems to be the sweet spot. Larger settings made the lines
unreadable long (on sites with expandable information).

However, moset of the users are at at least some technichal level.

Håkan Reis
HTTP://blog.reis.se

13 May 2006 - 1:25pm
cfmdesigns
2004

From: Håkan Reis <hakan.reis at dotway.se>

>Actually, I did a highly non-scientific study of this. I went through
>20-30 computers at work and checked their screen settings when surfing.I
>turns out the size of most browsers stopped at about 800 x 800. The
>width of 800 seems to be the sweet spot. Larger settings made the lines
>unreadable long (on sites with expandable information).
>
>However, moset of the users are at at least some technichal level.

Yes, that certainly makes sense. When using the
browser for reading purposes, a narrower window
makes sense. (Unless it's one of the many sites
that have scads of ads and links and such in both
the left and right columns (and maybe embedded in
the content itself), so you need the browser
wider to make the actual content wide enough to
get a decent column width.

When using the browser for data entry tasks,
checking stock portfolios, etc., the wider window
is apt to be desirable, to fit all the content in
comfortably. For myself, I'm not usually doing
both activities at once, so I change the browser
setting to match. (Or in some cases I use a
different browser completely, or at least a
second tabbed window, one for pages needing one
width and one for those needing another. But
that's less likely to be tactic used by the
general population, since it's both multiple
windows *and* tabs.)
--

----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Jim Drew Seattle, WA cfmdesigns at earthlink.net
http://home.earthlink.net/~rubberize/Weblog/index.html (Update: 5/2)
(Subject: Movie Commentary: I, Robot)

15 May 2006 - 12:12am
Vassili Bykov
2005

Here is a site with some fresh data I stumbled upon today:

http://www.collylogic.com/?/comments/the-importance-of-browser-window-width/

It would be interesting to see how browser window width and screen width
correlate.

Syndicate content Get the feed