UX résumés- what does yours look like?

30 Apr 2010 - 12:24am
4 years ago
21 replies
3247 reads
Mike Dunn
2008

I've been aggressively job-hunting lately, and a couple of weeks ago I decided to revise the tired old résumé I had been sending out- I felt it didn't really represent me well anymore. Instead of just swapping templates or just changing a few lines or adding new positions, I treated it like I would any other UX project.  My end result turned out to be the best representation of my career I've had to date, and I even blogged about it here: http://www.foolishstudios.com/design/building-a-better-ux-resume.htm. What's kind of fun at this point, now that I've landed a few interviews with it, is that I'm getting user feedback and I'm already taking notes for the next revision.

I thought it would be interesting to see what other UX professionals have done. Have any of you customized your résumés in a way that better reflects your role in this profession?

 

 

 

Comments

30 Apr 2010 - 1:02am
Nathanael Boehm
2008

The furthest I got was turning my skills matrix into a competency-weighted tag cloud. But I apply mostly for Government roles so not sure how something as fancy as yours would go down with gov recruiters. Would probably be binned without consideration for not meeting certain blandness criteria.

On initial glance I love what you've done but from a recruiters perspective I'm not sure how easy it would be to match up job criteria with the aggregated data visualisations, even though you have provided legends. However if this was being pitched outside a selection process I'm sure it would be most impressive and certainly get you noticed!

30 Apr 2010 - 1:28am
Mathew Sanders
2009

I've tried to combine my resume and portfolio into a single document. My biggest struggle is trying to give people a flavour of the work I produce while at the same time not being able to disclose confidential information.

I like how you've managed to keep yours to 2 pages. Here's my current version: http://www.mathewsanders.com/downloads/A-Portfolio-Of-Interaction-Design-by-Mathew-Sanders.pdf

30 Apr 2010 - 2:49am
Yamil Gonzales
2009

With all you respect Mathew after reading 2 pages from your resumé I just scroll it down 'till the end, it made me feel like newspaper advertising, I think the best way to go is keeping it simple, and by simple I mean 2 pages at most with a small (2 lines at most) description and a small picture of your products, all the sections make it clickable (links inside the pdf) so If the person who's reading in want to know more about a specific project he/she can click it and find it by him self.

30 Apr 2010 - 3:59am
fj
2010

The problem with these great CVs or resumés is that recruiters and recruiting systems do not know what to do with them, as they subvert their need to do quick matching by scanning for keywords. Recruiting systems like monster or those in use at large company websites like Nokia and IBM specifically barf on trying to upload a PDF or creative Doc. It exposes how dreadfully mechanical recruiting for creative and design endeavors has become.

I, too, needed to re-approach my CV recently when a recruiter told me that he didn't want to submit me for a gig because my capabilities and experience were all over the place, and did not show off that I had done enough or specialized in UX and ID, even though I consider it central to everything I have been doing. Ok then, I thought, having come off a gig at a digital agency that prides itself on fresh approaches, if his feedback was a creative brief, how would I approach it were I still at this agency?

My result was this PDF.

Suddenly recruiters and employers understand how the variety of my work hangs together. I did not do fancy graphics because I did not want to promise what I do not do well.

I need to redo it because of the left margin, but the responses so far to it are interesting when people read it. I also do think that with more of these short gigs in my future, my timeline idea is collapsing, so I need to create a more skill-oriented summary.

30 Apr 2010 - 6:40pm
Mathew Sanders
2009

@FJ, I'm loving your timeline approach. I think it's clear, tells a story of how you've developed your skills over time and breaks your work into nice chunks for people to skim and review - great job. I think I've got the inspiration for my CV update :)

On 30 April 2010 23:01, fj <fj.ixda@exonome.com> wrote:

The problem with these great CVs or resumés is that recruiters and recruiting systems do not know what to do with them, as they subvert their need to do quick matching by scanning for keywords. Recruiting systems like monster or those in use at large company websites like Nokia and IBM specifically barf on trying to upload a PDF or creative Doc. It exposes how dreadfully mechanical recruiting for creative and design endeavors has become.

I, too, needed to re-approach my CV recently when a recruiter told me that he didn't want to submit me for a gig because my capabilities and experience were all over the place, and did not show off that I had done enough or specialized in UX and ID, even though I consider it central to everything I have been doing. Ok then, I thought, having come off a gig at a digital agency that prides itself on fresh approaches, if his feedback was a creative brief, how would I approach it were I still at this agency?

My result was this PDF [1].

Suddenly recruiters and employers understand how the variety of my work hangs together. I did not do fancy graphics because I did not want to promise what I do not do well.

I need to redo it because of the left margin, but the responses so far to it are interesting when people read it. I also do think that with more of these short gigs in my future, my timeline idea is collapsing, so I need to create a more skill-oriented summary.

(
30 Apr 2010 - 5:20am
Rhonda Ranney
2010

Mike,

Thank you so much for posting this. I personally have been struggling with mine. I'm a newbie to the field and trying to find a job, I lack a portfolio an am working to build one. The standard resume is BORING, and it doesn't provide a clear representation of my skills. So thank you for posting this, it just ignited my fire to take a whole new approach to the dry dusty ole' resmume that has been choking me. Lol..

Thanks again for sharing some resume insight,
Rhonda

On Apr 30, 2010 4:46 AM, "Mike Dunn" <mike@foolishstudios.com> wrote:

I've been aggressively job-hunting lately, and a couple of weeks ago I decided to revise the tired old résumé I had been sending out- I felt it didn't really represent me well anymore. Instead of just swapping templates or just changing a few lines or adding new positions, I treated it like I would any other UX project.  My end result turned out to be the best representation of my career I've had to date, and I even blogged about it here: http://www.foolishstudios.com/design/building-a-better-ux-resume.htm [1]. What's kind of fun at this point, now that I've landed a few interviews with it, is that I'm getting user feedback and I'm already taking notes for the next revision.

I thought it would be interesting to see what other UX professionals have done. Have any of you customized your résumés in a way that better reflects your role in this profession?

 

 

 

(((Please l

30 Apr 2010 - 6:25am
akshadaks
2010

Hi Friends,

Please also give me suggestions to improve attached resume for UX designer.

Thanks in advance

 

30 Apr 2010 - 10:00am
Noa Dvoskin
2008

Here are some very interesting resumes:http://www.webdesignerdepot.com/2009/05/30-artistic-and-creative-résumés/


Noa

On Fri, Apr 30, 2010 at 1:47 AM, Mike Dunn <mike@foolishstudios.com> wrote:

I've been aggressively job-hunting lately, and a couple of weeks ago I decided to revise the tired old résumé I had been sending out- I felt it didn't really represent me well anymore. Instead of just swapping templates or just changing a few lines or adding new positions, I treated it like I would any other UX project.  My end result turned out to be the best representation of my career I've had to date, and I even blogged about it here: http://www.foolishstudios.com/design/building-a-better-ux-resume.htm [1]. What's kind of fun at this point, now that I've landed a few interviews with it, is that I'm getting user feedback and I'm already taking notes for the next revision.

I thought it would be interesting to see what other UX professionals have done. Have any of you customized your résumés in a way that better reflects your role in this profession?

 

 

 

(((Please lea
30 Apr 2010 - 11:21am
Benjamin Smith
2010

Developing a visually interesting resume doesn't necessarily mean you need to be adding more and more material so that your skills as a designer aren't underrepresented. Sometimes the most elegant solution is to design a very simple, clean interaction that is clear and communicable. 

As everything you do is a reflection of what you can do, adding a little flavor can make your abilities stand out. If you take it over the edge, the viewer is more than likely going to be overwhelmed with details. Mies van der Rohe was on to something when he said "less is more." The suggestion that your customization tells people something about your skills is more subtle in this way, but anyone can appreciate clear communication and intuitive visual progression, and experienced designers will appreciate it all the more.

This is just one end of the spectrum, but simplicity and elegance go hand in hand.

30 Apr 2010 - 1:26pm
Mike Dunn
2008

Thanks for all of the kind words, folks. Like I said, it was the first time working on my résumé was fun, and I'm happy to see that some of you found some inspiration in my approach- looking forward to see what you come up with!

Nathanael, FJ, naturally this execution isn't going to work for those employers or recruiters that require more traditional documents- that's why I have a text-only version as a backup. Pretty much the same thing but with the infographics formatted as bullet points.

Matthew- I've been having that same problem as well in regards to what I can and can't display in my portfolio. My solution so far has been to keep in close contact with clients that I have a confidentiality agreement with and get approval on specific pieces of what I want to show that don't give away any sensitive information. Might not always work but I've been lucky so far. In regards to your resume/portfolio, I think it might be a bit overwhelming to combine the two. Maybe splitting them up?

FJ- Looking at yours definitely makes me feel that the timeline concept is a strong one, and I like the additional data you related to the timeline.

Akshadaks- It doesn't look like you can attach the file to the thread. a web link maybe?

Benjamin- I absolutely agree, simplicity is paramount. Don't let the aesthetics get in the way of the data you are trying to present.


 

17 May 2010 - 12:56am
akshadaks
2010

Hi,

Please find my attached resume for discussion and improvements.

Would love to know your thoughts on it.

RESUME_Design_2.doc

Thanks

Akshay

AttachmentSize
RESUME_Design_2.doc 74 KB
30 Apr 2010 - 1:51pm
akshadaks
2010

Hi Mike,

Thanks for reply. I hope this this time resume is being uploaded. Friends, please have a look at it and your corrections, comments, suggestions are welcome.

 

Thanks

AttachmentSize
RESUME_Design_2.doc 74 KB
30 Apr 2010 - 9:40pm
Chris McLay
2005

Wow. This is a timely discussion as I spent most of the week considering how to sell myself and how to re-write my resume to make it easier to read and make it more appealing.

I’ve done a reasonable amount of hiring in the last few years and I used this experience as a driver for my reworking. When you receive a stack of 20+ resumés you have to sort through them quickly, and for me if I couldn’t quickly see that someone “gets” UX then it was quickly in the out pile. Then I looked for a balance of skills that I/we needed, e.g. design, research, visual, IA, stakeholder skills etc.

I really like Mike’s approach, but for me interpreting the infographics was too hard. They were pretty, but I couldn’t quickly interpret them. Maybe the next iteration will swing better. I did like the fact it was under three pages through, anything longer is just too much – I’ll talk to you if I want to know more.

That’s my 2¢, and it wouldn’t be fair if I didn’t put my own up for critique: http://eeoh.com.au/chris/resume/ which also goes alongsidehttp://eeoh.com.au/chris/about/ These, and the web site, are a current work in progress, but I’m happy with the direction.

It’s good to see people exploring this area more, it can definitely be improved.

One last comment, not everyone hiring UX people gets or understands UX. Getting a resume through these people makes the challenge much harder.

All the best, Chris

-- Chris McLay.

041 123 9190 http://eeoh.com.au/chris/

> (((Please leave all content

1 May 2010 - 6:30pm
mdostert
2010

love your resume chris!

Maureen Dostert 919.490.8405 mdostert2002@yahoo.com

----- Original Message ---- From: Chris McLay To: mdostert2002@yahoo.com Sent: Sat, May 1, 2010 12:51:30 AM Subject: Re: [IxDA] UX résumés- what does yours look like?

Wow. This is a timely discussion as I spent most of the week considering how to sell myself and how to re-write my resume to make it easier to read and make it more appealing.

I’ve done a reasonable amount of hiring in the last few years and I used this experience as a driver for my reworking. When you receive a stack of 20+ resumés you have to sort through them quickly, and for me if I couldn’t quickly see that someone “gets” UX then it was quickly in the out pile. Then I looked for a balance of skills that I/we needed, e.g. design, research, visual, IA, stakeholder skills etc.

I really like Mike’s approach, but for me interpreting the infographics was too hard. They were pretty, but I couldn’t quickly interpret them. Maybe the next iteration will swing better. I did like the fact it was under three pages through, anything longer is just too much – I’ll talk to you if I want to know more.

That’s my 2¢, and it wouldn’t be fair if I didn’t put my own up for critique: http://eeoh.com.au/chris/resume/ which also goes alongsidehttp://eeoh.com.au/chris/about/ These, and the web site, are a current work in progress, but I’m happy with the direction.

It’s good to see people exploring this area more, it can definitely be improved.

One last comment, not everyone hiring UX people gets or understands UX. Getting a resume through these people makes the challenge much harder.

All the best, Chris

-- Chris McLay.

041 123 9190 http://eeoh.com.au/chris/

> (((Please leave all content

(((Please leave all content be

2 May 2010 - 11:36am
seifip
2009

This is a very timely thread for me as I just recently finished my new CV...

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/118039/cv2.png

Please let me know what you think about it and how I could improve it :)

2 May 2010 - 1:20pm
mtumi
2004

Hi -

Happened to look at this, and it is nice looking, but I am unclear on what the line graph is meant to represent? Your skillset? If so, why did it take a dip after the financial crisis?

Considering UI and information design are frequently about simplifying and removing unnecessary data or abstractions, I would expect to field some questions on what the overall graph means and what you think graphing your skillset over time adds to the overall resume. Although the evolution of your career is interesting, I imagine most people are not hiring based on the skills you had in 05-09.

Props on taking the time to present in an original way.

Hope this is helpful - meant to be food for thought. Best of luck.

Michael

On May 2, 2010, at 12:51 PM, seifip wrote:

> This is a very timely thread for me as I just recently finished my new CV... > > http://dl.dropbox.com/u/118039/cv2.png [1] > > Please let me know what you think about it and how I could improve it :) > >

2 May 2010 - 2:50pm
Andrew Gill
2009

Seifip - Impressive CV - I like.

It's worth noting that many recruitment agencies do keyword searches on thousands of CV's in order to find candidates with appropriate skills and experience. I've often got work from having the right keywords on my CV - sad but true.


Andrew
Linkstream - SEO Web App

On 2 May 2010 20:04, Michael Tuminello <mt@motiontek.com> wrote:

Hi -

Happened to look at this, and it is nice looking, but I am unclear on what the line graph is meant to represent? Your skillset? If so, why did it take a dip after the financial crisis?

Considering UI and information design are frequently about simplifying and removing unnecessary data or abstractions, I would expect to field some questions on what the overall graph means and what you think graphing your skillset over time adds to the overall resume. Although the evolution of your career is interesting, I imagine most people are not hiring based on the skills you had in 05-09.

Props on taking the time to present in an original way.

Hope this is helpful - meant to be food for thought. Best of luck.

Michael

On May 2, 2010, at 12:51 PM, seifip wrote:

> This is a very timely thread for me as I just recently finished my new CV...
>
> http://dl.dropbox.com/u/118039/cv2.png [1]
>
> Please let me know what you think about it and how I could improve it :)
>
>

2 May 2010 - 2:06pm
seifip
2009

@Michael: It meant the amount and the diversity of projects I've had the opportunity to work on, and the experienced gained from working on them. I changed the wording to Amount of work and removed the financial crisis mark.

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/118039/cv2.png

Overall, I was trying to show my experience with a very diverse range of technologies and my will to learn new things and improve myself all the time.

2 May 2010 - 2:25pm
seifip
2009

Added some clients to the graph... Is it better or is it too cluttered and I should remove them again?

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/118039/cv3.png

8 May 2010 - 2:23am
Ericka Harshaw
2009

I am by no means an expert but from a graphic design standpoint I think your resume is pretty awesome especially compared to your old one which seemed a bit cluttered with text. I also think your use of persona creation as inspiration is also new and innovative. In addition, the layout is balanced, your use of  headings makes it easy to follow the content, and the color scheme is simple but not boring.

In terms of readability your font selections are great...different but legible. I also like that you used bullets for your Goals and Motivators section although the paragraphs of text in your Profile section seem a tad bit long. I think this has a lot to do with the fact that you're using landscape orientation...having long lines of paragraph text can be unappealing for some readers. Perhaps using bullets for that section (just to highlight key areas of your career) might make it a little more reader friendly.

With your categorization process, I think you've done a very nice job breaking down your areas of expertise. I'm currently revamping my resume so I'm going through the same process. Shifting the focus from types of software to more task oriented terms is an effective approach. However, I still think adding software expertise might be beneficial especially if the job you're applying for requires you to be experienced with specific software.

In terms of the infographics and timeline graphic they are great concepts but personally they seem overly complicated. While I understand them, it did take me some time to figure out how to interpret them. This is probably not a good thing, especially for potential employers who are generally short on time and will be sifting through tons of resumes. Because of this I commend you for having a  text-only version as a backup. 

Overall I think the changes that you've made are pretty cool. Your updated resume definitely gives me new ideas.

10 May 2010 - 7:01am
Junior Castro
2008

Hi everyone,

IMHO nowdays the best CV is a web-based one (ex. linkedin) supported by an online portfolio, this allows you to get feedback and community reputation, wich I think are very important while job hunting. PDF versions of CV and Portfolio could be sent upon request. In my case I linked both my linkedin public profile and my behance portfolio from my personal website: http://www.juniorcastro.com.

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