Career Shift

7 Jun 2010 - 2:28am
4 years ago
24 replies
2303 reads
anuragd
2010

Hi Guys,

I am a recent Computer Science graduate. I am looking to move into the field of Interaction Design. I have very little prior experience in the field, although I have done a lot of Photography and graphic design(portfolio: http://anuragd.com/portfolio.html)

I am unsure as to how to move into the field. I am ready to apply to graduate school, but my low GPA and lack of a IX portfolio is a barrier. Kindly advice on how to go about this?

All help will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Anurag

Comments

7 Jun 2010 - 9:07pm
Paul Smokovitz
2010

Best advice I could give anyone is to jump in and take on projects even if they are for free. The best way to learn is to just get in over your head then you can find the answers. We all have failed and learned from it. If you have not failed then you are just playing everything safe and not pushing your self.

Have fun.

8 Jun 2010 - 7:05pm
Jarod Tang
2007

This tells the truth.

+ 2 cents, keep designing better and improving sensation on good design. If not tired of restless refinement process after some projects, you may stand in the right stream.

On Tue, Jun 8, 2010 at 4:52 PM, Paul Smokovitz <paul@smokestudios.com> wrote:

Best advice I could give anyone is to jump in and take on projects even if they are for free. The best way to learn is to just get in over your head then you can find the answers. We all have failed and learned from it. If you have not failed then you are just playing everything safe and not pushing your self.

Have fun.

8 Jun 2010 - 8:35am
.pauric
2006

What is it that attracts you to the field of Interaction Design?  /pauric

8 Jun 2010 - 9:05pm
elvenmuse
2010

Can we call it Information Design?

> What is it that attracts you to the field of Interaction Design?  /pauric > > ((

9 Jun 2010 - 9:05am
.pauric
2006

Elven: "Can we call it Information Design?"

No, we cannot, two reasons;

1) The OP asked about IxD

2) You need to read the Information Design mailing list which is a totally and completely different set of posts about what we should call 'Making User Interfaces For A Living(tm)'

 

The reason I asked the OP what attracted him to the field is this line on his website  "My current interest lies in Interaction Design, which I view as a path to create a technology based start up in the social sector."   .  I'd like to better understand the logic behind this path.

 

regards /pauric

 

9 Jun 2010 - 10:05am
Jayson Elliot
2008

Information Design is a very specific discipline which has more to do with the crossroads of statistics, data, and visual communication.



On Wed, Jun 9, 2010 at 4:47 AM, elvenmuse <vincenzi@lavabit.com> wrote:

Can we call it Information Design?

> What is it that attracts you to the field of Interaction Design?  /pauric
>
> ((

((
8 Jun 2010 - 3:36pm
ktangney
2010

Hi Anurag,

I am also a recent CS graduate (within the last year) with a concentration in HCI but at the same time was trying to finish a degree in studio art but didn't have enough time. I was a developer for a bit out of school but just recently landed a position as a UX architect. While I don't have the cognative science and design skills as the veterans yet I still find myself playing the liaison between the UX spaces and developer spaces as I soak up as much as I can from my colleagues.

Do what you can to get into the field even if it is as a developer, designer, etc. and use your colleagues, you'll learn an incredible amount from them. The versatility of CS and design is not a bad thing. A lot of places will honor it you just have to play it to your advantages.

 

8 Jun 2010 - 5:05pm
mdostert
2010

How does a computer science person land a UX architect position. This makes no sense to me.

Maureen Dostert 919.490.8405 mdostert2002@yahoo.com

----- Original Message ---- From: ktangney To: mdostert2002@yahoo.com Sent: Tue, June 8, 2010 5:13:37 PM Subject: Re: [IxDA] Career Shift

Hi Anurag,

I am also a recent CS graduate (within the last year) with a concentration in HCI but at the same time was trying to finish a degree in studio art but didn't have enough time. I was a developer for a bit out of school but just recently landed a position as a UX architect. While I don't have the cognative science and design skills as the veterans yet I still find myself playing the liaison between the UX spaces and developer spaces as I soak up as much as I can from my colleagues.

Do what you can to get into the field even if it is as a developer, designer, etc. and use your colleagues, you'll learn an incredible amount from them. The versatility of CS and design is not a bad thing. A lot of places will honor it you just have to play it to your advantages.

8 Jun 2010 - 7:05pm
Wendy Fischer
2004

I'd suggest if you are a CS person, then you should have/or get experience in user interface implementation and engineering. Some people then tend to step into the role of design if they have the interest/background, particuarly if they are in a small company or in a department with a void in UX.  This type of person might start doing testing or start doing design work and prototyping before implementation Wendy

--- On Tue, 6/8/10, mdostert <mdostert2002@yahoo.com> wrote:


From: mdostert <mdostert2002@yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: [IxDA] Career Shift
To: erpdesigner@yahoo.com
Date: Tuesday, June 8, 2010, 4:24 PM

How does a computer science person land a UX architect position. This makes no sense to me.

Maureen Dostert
919.490.8405
mdostert2002@yahoo.com

----- Original Message ----
From: ktangney
To: mdostert2002@yahoo.com
Sent: Tue, June 8, 2010 5:13:37 PM
Subject: Re: [IxDA] Career Shift

Hi Anurag,

I am also a recent CS graduate (within the last year) with a concentration in HCI but at the same time was trying to finish a degree in studio art but didn't have enough time. I was a developer for a bit out of school but just recently landed a position as a UX architect. While I don't have the cognative science and design skills as the veterans yet I still find myself playing the liaison between the UX spaces and developer spaces as I soak up as much as I can from my colleagues.

Do what you can to get into the field even if it is as a developer, designer, etc. and use your colleagues, you'll learn an incredible amount from them. The versatility of CS and design is not a bad thing. A lot of places will honor it you just have to play it to your advantages.

9 Jun 2010 - 6:06am
MichelGrignon
2008

----- Original Message ----- From: "Wendy Fischer" To: Sent: Tuesday, June 08, 2010 9:58 PM Subject: Re: [IxDA] Career Shift

> I'd suggest if you are a CS person, then you should have/or get experience > in user interface implementation and engineering. Some people then tend > to step into the role of design if they have the interest/background, > particuarly if they are in a small company or in a department with a void > in UX. This type of person might start doing testing or start doing > design work and prototyping before implementation > > Wendy--- On Tue, 6/8/10, mdostert // wrote: >> From: mdostert Subject: Re: [IxDA] Career >> ShiftTo: erpdesigner@yahoo.comDate: Tuesday, June 8, 2010, 4:24 PM >>How does a computer science person land a UX architect position. This >>makes no sense to me.Maureen Dostert919.490.8405mdostert2002@yahoo.com >>[1]----- Original Message ----From: ktangneyTo: mdostert2002@yahoo.com >>[2]Sent: Tue, June 8, 2010 5:13:37 PMSubject: Re: [IxDA] Career ShiftHi >>Anurag,I am also a recent CS graduate (within the last year) with a >>concentration in HCI but at the same time was trying to finish a degree >>in studio art but didn't have enough time. I was a developer for a bit >>out of school but just recently landed a position as a UX architect. >>While I don't have the cognative science and design skills as the >>veterans yet I still >>find myself playing the liaison between the UX spaces and developer spaces >>as I soak up as much as I can from my colleagues.Do what you can to get >>into the field even if it is as a developer, designer, etc. and use your >>colleagues, you'll learn an incredible amount from them. The versatility >>of CS and design is not a bad thing. A lot of places will honor it you >>just have to play it to your advantages. >> > >

8 Jun 2010 - 9:05pm
elvenmuse
2010

before it was market-able, UX was first called Interface Design and was a specialization within the Computer Science field.

> How does a computer science person land a UX architect position. This > makes > no sense to me. > > Maureen Dostert > 919.490.8405 > mdostert2002@yahoo.com > > ----- Original Message ---- > From: ktangney > To: mdostert2002@yahoo.com > Sent: Tue, June 8, 2010 5:13:37 PM > Subject: Re: [IxDA] Career Shift > > Hi Anurag, > > I am also a recent CS graduate (within the last year) with a concentration > in > HCI but at the same time was trying to finish a degree in studio art but > didn't have enough time. I was a developer for a bit out of school but > just > recently landed a position as a UX architect. While I don't have the > cognative science and design skills as the veterans yet I still find > myself > playing the liaison between the UX spaces and developer spaces as I soak > up > as much as I can from my colleagues. > > Do what you can to get into the field even if it is as a developer, > designer, > etc. and use your colleagues, you'll learn an incredible amount from them. > The versatility of CS and design is not a bad thing. A lot of places will > honor it you just have to play it to your advantages. > >

8 Jun 2010 - 11:06pm
mdostert
2010

Actually that isn't true. In the 1990s, developers looked for graphic designers to do interface design, with the misguided notion that designers will make the ap pretty for the developers. This has been a big issue at least since the 1990s with computer science people doing development work and their inability to comprehend interaction, which is why the field arose. However, not all of them were misguided. The inadequate applications being developed by computer science people who deemed programming more important than the prospect of actually using the ap. Graphic designers and computer science do not have the skills to think about user interaction. Thinking about coding and designing are often two different thinking processes. I do both and after programming I usually can't write words and text for two days. I still can't figure out how you got this job. Perhaps it is a programming job. Just frustrated because I have been doing information development for at least ten years and I now have an MSIS in Information Science and HCI from a prestigious university and am having a slow time finding work.

Maureen Dostert 919.490.8405 mdostert2002@yahoo.com

----- Original Message ---- From: elvenmuse To: mdostert2002@yahoo.com Sent: Tue, June 8, 2010 11:37:25 PM Subject: Re: [IxDA] Career Shift

before it was market-able, UX was first called Interface Design and was a specialization within the Computer Science field.

> How does a computer science person land a UX architect position. This > makes > no sense to me. > > Maureen Dostert > 919.490.8405 > mdostert2002@yahoo.com > > ----- Original Message ---- > From: ktangney > To: mdostert2002@yahoo.com > Sent: Tue, June 8, 2010 5:13:37 PM > Subject: Re: [IxDA] Career Shift > > Hi Anurag, > > I am also a recent CS graduate (within the last year) with a concentration > in > HCI but at the same time was trying to finish a degree in studio art but > didn't have enough time. I was a developer for a bit out of school but > just > recently landed a position as a UX architect. While I don't have the > cognative science and design skills as the veterans yet I still find > myself > playing the liaison between the UX spaces and developer spaces as I soak > up > as much as I can from my colleagues. > > Do what you can to get into the field even if it is as a developer, > designer, > etc. and use your colleagues, you'll learn an incredible amount from them. > The versatility of CS and design is not a bad thing. A lot of places will > honor it you just have to play it to your advantages. > >

9 Jun 2010 - 1:06pm
Andrei Herasimchuk
2004

"Graphic designers and computer science do not have the skills to think about user interaction."
Not true. Not sure why one even make such a claim.
-Andrei

13 Jun 2010 - 10:05pm
mdostert
2010

No they are not mutually exclusive thanks to the potentially overlap and degrees of certain skills area but still they are all different fields of study with a different focus meant for different parts of the big picture. As I read these posts, I find that this discussion is really one about semantics.

----- Original Message ---- From: Andrei To: mdostert2002@yahoo.com Sent: Wed, June 9, 2010 10:24:25 PM Subject: Re: [IxDA] Career Shift

"Graphic designers and computer science do not have the skills to think about user interaction." Not true. Not sure why one even make such a claim. -Andrei

9 Jun 2010 - 6:07pm
Michel Vuijlsteke
2007

On 9 June 2010 09:28, mdostert <mdostert2002@yahoo.com> wrote:

[...] with computer science people doing development work and their inability to comprehend interaction [...] Graphic designers and computer science do not have the skills to think about user interaction. Thinking about coding and designing are often two different thinking processes.


I wuld most strongly disagree with this. Graphic design, coding, interaction design and information architecture are not mutually exclusive skills. Far from. 
Michel Vuijlsteke www.namahn.com
(

8 Jun 2010 - 9:05pm
elvenmuse
2010

I have to agree; being able to Design and Code is a big plus when searching for jobs.

> Hi Anurag, > > I am also a recent CS graduate (within the last year) with a concentration > in > HCI but at the same time was trying to finish a degree in studio art but > didn't have enough time. I was a developer for a bit out of school but > just > recently landed a position as a UX architect. While I don't have the > cognative science and design skills as the veterans yet I still find > myself > playing the liaison between the UX spaces and developer spaces as I soak > up > as much as I can from my colleagues. > > Do what you can to get into the field even if it is as a developer, > designer, > etc. and use your colleagues, you'll learn an incredible amount from them. > The versatility of CS and design is not a bad thing. A lot of places will > honor it you just have to play it to your advantages. > >   > > ((

8 Jun 2010 - 10:06pm
Alvin Woon
2007
How does a computer science person land a UX architect position. This makes no sense to me


Why?
On Wed, Jun 9, 2010 at 11:01 AM, elvenmuse <vincenzi@lavabit.com> wrote:

I have to agree; being able to Design and Code is a big plus when
searching for jobs.

> Hi Anurag,
>
> I am also a recent CS graduate (within the last year) with a concentration
> in
> HCI but at the same time was trying to finish a degree in studio art but
> didn't have enough time. I was a developer for a bit out of school but
> just
> recently landed a position as a UX architect. While I don't have the
> cognative science and design skills as the veterans yet I still find
> myself
> playing the liaison between the UX spaces and developer spaces as I soak
> up
> as much as I can from my colleagues.
>
> Do what you can to get into the field even if it is as a developer,
> designer,
> etc. and use your colleagues, you'll learn an incredible amount from them.
> The versatility of CS and design is not a bad thing. A lot of places will
> honor it you just have to play it to your advantages.
>
>  
>
> ((

((
28 Jun 2010 - 6:44am
alisonboncha
2010

Definately agree. Work that CS degree! Get in as a rapid prototyper extraordinaire, they will love you! And make sure you get an excellent Interaction Design mentor. Ask to be tasked with layout, workflow, and design challenges. You will gain magnificent experience.

9 Jun 2010 - 12:52am
anuragd
2010

Thanks for the advice. The issue is, I can't seem to find enough work(even for free) around. I have plans on taking on a few personal projects as of now.

9 Jun 2010 - 6:07pm
Jarod Tang
2007

beside personal project, you may also like this,
   https://creative.mozilla.org/challenges/4,
   http://boards.core77.com/viewforum.php?f=35,


On Wed, Jun 9, 2010 at 5:28 PM, anuragd <anurag.dutta1@gmail.com> wrote:

Thanks for the advice. The issue is, I can't seem to find enough work(even for free) around. I have plans on taking on a few personal projects as of now.

(((P
9 Jun 2010 - 1:16am
hersh
2010

Hi Anurag,

A formal education in cognitive sciences or hci is helpful but not necessary by any means. UX specialists can easily emanate from CS.

UX design is a practice. You need to learn it by doing it again and again under someones mentorship. It's immensely crucial that you research your own course material and come up with projects that have a strong theoretical ground. This will help compile your portfolio. Future employers will be able to gauge your potential by your work, dedication to the field and testimonial by mentor. In addition you would have a CS/tech background that will set you apart. I've yet to come across a UX professional who really understands code. I often see puzzled UX pros working with legacy setup bouncing between business requirements and estimates. That could be your usp. Cheers.

9 Jun 2010 - 10:06am
Jayson Elliot
2008

Anurag,

I would suggest looking for an internship first, if you can afford to take an unpaid gig for a while. The opportunity to work on a day-to-day basis with UX professionals in a real world environment is invaluable.




On Tue, Jun 8, 2010 at 3:58 AM, anuragd <anurag.dutta1@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi Guys,

I am a recent Computer Science graduate. I am looking to move into the field of Interaction Design. I have very little prior experience in the field, although I have done a lot of Photography and graphic design(portfolio: http://anuragd.com/portfolio.html)

I am unsure as to how to move into the field. I am ready to apply to graduate school, but my low GPA and lack of a IX portfolio is a barrier. Kindly advice on how to go about this?

All help will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Anurag

9 Jun 2010 - 10:24pm
Dave Malouf
2005

Heck in many circles, developers OWN the final implementation of the design and as noted in other threads there are places where IxD/IA are not official/separate roles at all, so development is as good an owner as design. Take your passion into what you know and extend up or down from there. Just BE the designer on the projects where you are already a developer/engineer.

As to the whole debate about who can or can't think like an IxD ... what a silly debate. It isn't about ability, but about actually doing it. There is nothing genetic here about IxDs. If you take the time to learn it you can do it, but it is a decision and it is clear by the examples of horrible GD and UI Dev trying that it takes more than intention, it takes practice and education.

The same could be said about GD, Engineering, or for that matter any mode of being.

-- dave

15 Jun 2010 - 5:05am
Stew Dean
2007

My tuppence on this is that a good techncial knowledge and graphic design knowledge helps but are not central to the role of large scale interaction design, both of these are implimentation skills.  Interaction / User Experience design is often more about concepts and blueprints and many fall into this feild because of the mindset that goes with it. An 'engineering' mindset can often be a hinderance as can lead to too much of a focus on details and how things are going to be built rather than what needs to be built, the reason why many very capable programmers cannot design usable software, they are far to logical in their approach and make mistakes like the user being a perfect being who perceives and understand everything on the page all the time.

  It's worth reading at least one conceptual book on the subject, Alan Cooper has written several good ones. At least get a copy of 'Don't make me think' by Steve Krug.   Cheers   Stew Dean

  On 8 June 2010 06:16, anuragd <anurag.dutta1@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi Guys,

I am a recent Computer Science graduate. I am looking to move into the field of Interaction Design. I have very little prior experience in the field, although I have done a lot of Photography and graphic design(portfolio: http://anuragd.com/portfolio.html)

I am unsure as to how to move into the field. I am ready to apply to graduate school, but my low GPA and lack of a IX portfolio is a barrier. Kindly advice on how to go about this?

All help will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Anurag

(((Pleas
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