Re: [IxDA] Is it really necessary to master TYPE to be an IxD?

22 Jul 2010 - 8:12am
3 years ago
4 replies
547 reads
DrWex
2006

Another way to frame this is to look at the body of knowledge that is available. Typography has easily 150 years of trial, error, experimentation, learning, growth, adaptation to new technologies, etc. behind it. Very few of the other areas we draw on have such a long history. In terms of looking at a body of knowledge from which one can draw useful principles, patterns, and examples you can find quite a lot in typography that speaks to general areas of UX concern such as - what is persuasive? What aids visibility? What sort of feel are you conveying? How do you help people gain trust in what you're presenting? How do you optimize for scanning/searching? What works well for in-depth reading?

As David Malouf pointed out you don't have to become a well-known innovator in the field, but I feel it would be a mistake to ignore the opportunities and lessons available here.

--Alan

(I will admit that I'm heavily influenced by Muriel Cooper who advocated very strongly for her students to study typography; I found her arguments and examples quite persuasive.)

Comments

23 Jul 2010 - 8:31am
jonkarpoff
2009

If you really want people to read your content you would greatly benefit from learning typography. Letter height relative to interline spacing and line width are critical for optimal readability. Also understanding that smaller type needs to be more 'open'. Light type fces tend to break at small sizes. The platform matters to typography. Learn how differently type is rendered at 768x1024 on a computer monitor and on an iPad. I don't know of any great typography site or book. I started learning at my Father's knee and have just kept going for 37 years.

23 Jul 2010 - 11:05am
Oleh Kovalchuke
2006

I found 'The Elements of Typographic Style' by Robert Bringhurst both interesting and useful in my work.

 

Oleh Kovalchuke (816) 808-6177 Skype: tangospring     On Fri, Jul 23, 2010 at 10:36 AM, jon karpoff <jon.karpoff@ogilvy.com> wrote: > > If you really want people to read your content you would greatly benefit from learning typography. Letter height relative to interline spacing and line width are critical for optimal readability. Also understanding that smaller type needs to be more 'open'. Light type fces tend to break at small sizes. The platform matters to typography. Learn how differently type is rendered at 768x1024 on a computer monitor and on an iPad. I don't know of any great typography site or book. I started learning at my Father's knee and have just kept going for 37 years.

> > (((Pl

23 Jul 2010 - 3:19pm
Jack L. Moffett
2005

Ellen Lupton's more recent book, Thinking with Type, is outstanding: http://www.papress.com/other/thinkingwithtype/index.htm

Eric Spiekerman's Stop Stealing Sheep is a very good introductory book: http://amzn.to/16UnUu

The Elements of Typographic Style Applied to the Web is another good resource: http://webtypography.net/

23 Jul 2010 - 3:35pm
bente
2010

I second Jack L Moffett on all three - and allow me to suggest a more whimsical, scribbly and inspirational tome: the art of looking sideways, by Alan Fletcher.

i was trained in "classical" (read: from the precambrian period of pre 90's) typography. It is a craft, as there are good carpenters and bad carpenters, so with typography too. Your house will not fall down, but a good job can be felt. I see no reason to make it a big discussion; today everyone is a designer, but look at what the good guys do.

Syndicate content Get the feed