Design pattern for multiple add to basket / quantity discount

27 Sep 2010 - 9:08am
4 years ago
7 replies
1547 reads
Sam Menter
2008

Hi,

I'm looking for examples of best practice for a product page that has multiple buy options. The product has 4 different size options, all with different prices. In addition the prices are discounted if a user buys more than 10, 50, 250, or 1000. So effectively the product has 20 (4*5) different prices.

Now to simplify the page, the pricing could be displayed after a user selects size and quantity, but there's a benefit to the business of displaying all prices, so the customer realises the cost/benefit of buying more or larger product. 

One solution is to display a big table of prices with size on Y and quantity on X, but this looks quite intimidating for the user, particularly as lots of these users are 65+...

Can you show me some links where people have handled this well?

Thanks very much,

Sam

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www.pixelthread.co.uk

Comments

27 Sep 2010 - 11:22am
Sam Menter
2008

PS does this still work as an email list? It used to be really good, but then got spammy and then I stopped receiving email altogether...

27 Sep 2010 - 2:19pm
smitty777
2010

Sounds like Ajax to the rescue to me.  I would definitely not put all this in a table, if I'm understanding your problem correctly. Maybe not this exact interaction, but how about selecting dropdowns or (even better) sliders that automatically update the price based on the settings?  

27 Sep 2010 - 3:26pm
Sam Menter
2008

I'm liking the cut of your jib, definitely space for some ajax wizardry. I'd like to use sliders, but the site audience includes lots of 65+ users, who might find them a block, but I guess if they're intuitive enough they could work

28 Sep 2010 - 8:10am
smitty777
2010

I agree about the demographics issue too, Sam (that's actually why I had "...not this exact interaction.." in the orig post).  It's a tough one, not only because of the motor/coordination issue with that age group, but the possible lack of computer expertise.  Since you only have 4x5 options, you might be able to get away with using larger buttons (Fitt's  - it's the law!).   As far as the computer savvy aspect of it -that's where your design magic comes into play.  Oh yeah, and usability testing. 

28 Sep 2010 - 4:03pm
Ivan Burmistrov
2009

I think this case may have different solutions depending on the product. What product do they sell?

28 Sep 2010 - 4:24pm
Sam Menter
2008

Plants and trees - so sometimes people buy big batches e.g. if planting a hedge...

29 Sep 2010 - 4:35pm
Ivan Burmistrov
2009

In case of a hedgegrow, I might try the following approach:

ask the customer about the length of hedge and its height and then offer a “turnkey solution” showing the number of plants necessary and their (discounted) price.

(In case of a garden, ask about its acreage etc.)

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