Re: [IxDA] Re: [IxDA] Re: [IxDA] Re: [IxDA] Simplicity is Not Overrated, Just Misunderstood

29 Sep 2010 - 2:16am
3 years ago
1 reply
820 reads
Janne Kaasalainen
2008

Hi Richard,

I was simply wishing to point out that buying in general is a situation where I think it should be reasonable to question whether the customer has sufficient information to make an informed decision. I would think it fair to assume that consumer electronics as well as as software, whether in web or not, are very difficult to judge without special interest to do so or previous exposure to them and their alternatives.

What comes to needs, if we explain everything by saying it satisfies some need, yes, we only buy things we need. However, I would think it is fair to question if people make rational, conscious analysis of themselves and what would fit them best when they are buying new things.

Claiming that people buy simple things because they know what they need relies on people having facts available, have them understood and that there are no conflicting reasons to choice otherwise. All of those are very fragile assumptions if made generally.

You are of course entitled to your opinion, I only tried to provide a few possibilities on why people may not buy what would perhaps be best for them. Early on in this thread there have already been links to material that suggests that simplicity on its own may have less impact on buying decisions than we'd hope for.

Back to work now, Janne Kaasalainen

Comments

29 Sep 2010 - 3:43am
hfjm
2010

 

Hi Janne,

 

As well as the customer having sufficient *information* to make an *informed* decision, designers also need to have sufficient consumer empathy, to guide them into the decision that suits our business objectives .Even without a special interest or previous exposure to them and their alternatives, it is surprisingly easy to do this - with powerful results.

 

If we apply the science of persuasive design to architect the decision space, it questions the very point you make - we can't explain everything by saying it satisfies some need. You are right to question if people make rational, conscious analysis of themselves and what would fit them best when they are buying new things.

 

I also like your point about "fragile assumptions" in persuasive design . Another important strand we must consider is 'trust'. Without trust (even with all the persuasion and emotion in the world), your customer still won't add to basket.

 

For more information, there's a short whitepaper written in a great conversational style, which  reviews key research findings on consumer decision making and persuasion. Real world examples of great persuasive design are illustrated, demonstrating how key persuasive strategies (such as: social proof, perceptual contrast, obedience to authority, framing, and scarcity) can be applied to improve designs.

 

Have a good day

 

https://www.humanfactors.com/downloads/whitepapersrequest.asp?whitepaper=convincing

 

PS - if you want to chat rather than read, feel free to contact me

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