The NDA Barrier

15 Nov 2010 - 4:38pm
3 years ago
4 replies
1392 reads
JasonAlexander
2010

I have really had this day with a recruiter, going back and forth regarding work samples.  I am relatively new to the UX field and I do not have the 5+ years of experience that so many job postings are requiring!

I only have a few deliverables that are not protected by a "non-disclosure agreement" or "not to be shown without specific written consent of <"blank">.  I understand I won't make any headway with this recruiter, though I am perplexed at her attempt to even try to understand my deliervable's, since it has been clear they are very foreign to her!

What is a guy to do? Does anyone have any advice?  I have been already told, from more senior folks, that a portfolio is not very important, but they have a substantial work history to glean from, that I do not!

I am caught up in that ancient adage of "you need a job to get experience, but you can't get experience without a job"

Comments

15 Nov 2010 - 5:29pm
krystaylor
2010

First of all, portfolio is VERY important.  I won't consider a design candidate for anything other than trainee, if they don't have a portfolio.  Your work says EVERYTHING about you.

Second, I would make sure to clear deliverables with former employers before you leave.  I send a packet of stuff to my direct supervisor saying "I intend to put this in my portfolio.  Is that ok?"  You'd be surprised how reasonable people can be.

Third, unless everything you have designed is behind a firewall, you can show anything that is live on the web or was formerly live.  It's considered published material.

Fourth, if all else fails, I will let people glance over stuff in person.  They can give a cursory glance at your wireframes, test plans, reports or whatever else they want.  Make sure to redact or obscure (I use a sharpie marker or lipsum text) any information that could be considered a trade secret.

Good luck to you!  Even with all of this, you'll still run into people who say that's not enough.  I'd say that's a situation where you are not going to fit anyways, and you should thank them for their time and move on.

-Krys

15 Nov 2010 - 6:05pm
monkeyshine
2010

I would be very careful about showing work (just in person) that you shouldn't (under NDA agreement) be showing. If you happen to be showing it to a company who also has a strict NDA policy, you've just shot yourself in the foot. 
Deanna


On Mon, Nov 15, 2010 at 2:40 PM, krystaylor <krys@swankster.com> wrote:

First of all, portfolio is VERY important.  I won't consider a design candidate for anything other than trainee, if they don't have a portfolio.  Your work says EVERYTHING about you.

Second, I would make sure to clear deliverables with former employers before you leave.  I send a packet of stuff to my direct supervisor saying "I intend to put this in my portfolio.  Is that ok?"  You'd be surprised how reasonable people can be.

Third, unless everything you have designed is behind a firewall, you can show anything that is live on the web or was formerly live.  It's considered published material.

Fourth, if all else fails, I will let people glance over stuff in person.  They can give a cursory glance at your wireframes, test plans, reports or whatever else they want.  Make sure to redact or obscure (I use a sharpie marker or lipsum text) any information that could be considered a trade secret.

Good luck to you!  Even with all of this, you'll still run into people who say that's not enough.  I'd say that's a situation where you are not going to fit anyways, and you should thank them for their time and move on.

-Krys

(((Please l
15 Nov 2010 - 6:05pm
Marcus Blankenship
2010

Volunteer for companies willing to let you put their work on your portfolio/job history. Non-profits are often willing to accept help in this way.

-----Original Message----- From: ixdaor@host.ixda.org [mailto:ixdaor@host.ixda.org] On Behalf Of Jasalex Sent: Monday, November 15, 2010 2:03 PM To: marcus@creoagency.com Subject: [IxDA] The NDA Barrier

I have really had this day with a recruiter, going back and forth regarding
work samples. I am relatively new to the UX field and I do not have the 5+
years of experience that so many job postings are requiring!

I only have a few deliverables that are not protected by a "non-disclosure
agreement" or "not to be shown without specific written consent of <"blank">.
I understand I won't make any headway with this recruiter, though I am
perplexed at her attempt to even try to understand my deliervable's, since it
has been clear they are very foreign to her!

What is a guy to do? Does anyone have any advice? I have been already told,
from more senior folks, that a portfolio is not very important, but they have
a substantial work history to glean from, that I do not!

I am caught up in that ancient adage of "you need a job to get experience,
but you can't get experience without a job"

15 Nov 2010 - 6:05pm
blissfulguru
2010

Whoever told you a portfolio was not important was not being realistic. A portfolio is very important. I have recruiters and hiring managers constantly visit my portfolio and my sites, and examine the code behind the design.

Create a site to show off your work. Whether it is a personal site or a site you do for a friend or non-profit, give it all your best tricks and then use that as your showcase piece.

Debbie

On Mon, 15 Nov 2010 16:12:25 -0600, Jasalex wrote: > I have really had this day with a recruiter, going back and forth > regarding
> work samples.  I am relatively new to the UX field and I do not have the > 5+
> years of experience that so many job postings are requiring! > > I only have a few deliverables that are not protected by a "non-disclosure > > agreement" or "not to be shown without specific written consent of > <"blank">.
>  I understand I won't make any headway with this recruiter, though I am

> perplexed at her attempt to even try to understand my deliervable's, since > it
> has been clear they are very foreign to her! > > What is a guy to do? Does anyone have any advice?  I have been already > told,
> from more senior folks, that a portfolio is not very important, but they > have
> a substantial work history to glean from, that I do not! > > I am caught up in that ancient adage of "you need a job to get experience, > > but you can't get experience without a job" > > (((

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