Re: [IxDA] Malicious User Interfaces

24 Nov 2010 - 6:01am
4 years ago
4 replies
933 reads
bitpakkit
2010

darkpatterns.org

On 10-11-23 10:54 PM, "interactive fiction" wrote:

> Some time back I picked up a PDF on malicious interfaces. I've attached the > PDF to this post for reference. Basically, it's the use of UI design to > effectively coerce the user into considering material (ads, etc) that they > don't want to deal with, or to create an outcome that may run counter to what > the user actually wants to do. > > It's not something that I've found a lot of research on. The PDF I've > attached is one publication. I can't remember where I picked it up, but it > was being distributed for free. I know another one is floating around > somewhere, but that's the extent of my knowledge. I would have though there > would be more information on this. Does anyone have insight into this trend? > > Attachment Size Malicious Interfaces.pdf [1] 580.23 KB > (((Please leave all content below this line))) > ________________________________________________________________ > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA) Discussion! > Manage Subscriptions or Unsubscribe .......... > http://www.ixda.org/user/35468/notifications > Discussion Guidelines .......... http://www.ixda.org/help > > -- > > View original post: > http://www.ixda.org/mailcomment/redirect/%3C35468.28550.0.1290569946.7192e80f7 > f6418233e42ddb595de39f2%40ixda.org%3E > > > [1] http://www.ixda.org/sites/default/files/Malicious Interfaces.pdf >

Comments

24 Nov 2010 - 8:05am
Chauncey Wilson
2007

Unethical persuasive user interfaces are discussed in B. J. Fogg's book on Persuasive Technology (Morgan Kaufmann).  Some time ago there was a talk that went into how various design principles could be used in unethical ways ranging from a negatively worded checkbox label that led you to believe you were opting out when in fact you were opting in to junk stuff.

  Some companies have advertising where they hide the link to close the ad in the upper right using 5 point type and white on a light background so in effect, they were using principles of contrast, size (Fitt's law), attention (peripheral vision) to make it hard to get out of an ad. 

There was a study on older users who got those "YOU MIGHT HAVE A VIRUS" messages that were really malicious ads but the elderly users thought that they had to buy a particular product (one of which was really malicious).

  This would make an excellent talk with the focus on how principles of design can be corrupted.    The Fogg book discusses ethical and unethical uses of persuasion and notes that much of what we do depends on persuasive technology now rather than persuasive people and many of the same principles from design and social psychology can be used for good or evil.

  This would make a great topic for next year IxDA conference.  Something like "Good Principles Gone Bad: When Design Goes from Persuasive to Malicious".   Chauncey
On Wed, Nov 24, 2010 at 7:31 AM, bitpakkit <watson@adobe.com> wrote:

darkpatterns.org

On 10-11-23 10:54 PM, "interactive fiction" wrote:

> Some time back I picked up a PDF on malicious interfaces. I've attached the
> PDF to this post for reference. Basically, it's the use of UI design to
> effectively coerce the user into considering material (ads, etc) that they
> don't want to deal with, or to create an outcome that may run counter to what
> the user actually wants to do.
>
> It's not something that I've found a lot of research on. The PDF I've
> attached is one publication. I can't remember where I picked it up, but it
> was being distributed for free. I know another one is floating around
> somewhere, but that's the extent of my knowledge. I would have though there
> would be more information on this. Does anyone have insight into this trend?
>
> Attachment Size Malicious Interfaces.pdf [1] 580.23 KB
> (((Please lea
24 Nov 2010 - 11:22am
bojcampbell
2010

This is a good argument for being a part of and promoting a credible professional interaction organization with rules of ethics such as the UPA.

24 Nov 2010 - 1:05pm
burlapdesign
2010

Think they are also referred to as "Dark Patterns " see http://darkpatterns.org

On Nov 24, 2010 6:26 AM, "bitpakkit" <watson@adobe.com> wrote:

darkpatterns.org

On 10-11-23 10:54 PM, "interactive fiction" wrote:

> Some time back I picked up a PDF on malicious interfaces. I've attached the
> PDF to this post for reference. Basically, it's the use of UI design to
> effectively coerce the user into considering material (ads, etc) that they
> don't want to deal with, or to create an outcome that may run counter to what
> the user actually wants to do.
>
> It's not something that I've found a lot of research on. The PDF I've
> attached is one publication. I can't remember where I picked it up, but it
> was being distributed for free. I know another one is floating around
> somewhere, but that's the extent of my knowledge. I would have though there
> would be more information on this. Does anyone have insight into this trend?
>
> Attachment Size Malicious Interfaces.pdf [1] 580.23 KB
>

25 Nov 2010 - 7:06am
James Page
2008


This would make an excellent talk with the focus on how principles of design can be corrupted. 

Harry Brignul the creater of darkpaterns.org gave a fantastic talk on this at UxBrighton 2010. You can see his slides here www.slideshare.net/harrybr/ux-brighton-dark-patterns
James Pagehttp://blog.webnographer.com


On 24 November 2010 19:30, burlapdesign <burlapdesign@dillonross.info> wrote:

Think they are also referred to as "Dark Patterns " see http://darkpatterns.org [1]

On Nov 24, 2010 6:26 AM, "bitpakkit" <watson@adobe.com [2]> wrote:

darkpatterns.org [3]

On 10-11-23 10:54 PM, "interactive fiction" wrote:

> Some time back I picked up a PDF on malicious interfaces. I've attached the
> PDF to this post for reference. Basically, it's the use of UI design to
> effectively coerce the user into considering material (ads, etc) that they
> don't want to deal with, or to create an outcome that may run counter to what
> the user actually wants to do.
>
> It's not something that I've found a lot of research on. The PDF I've
> attached is one publication. I can't remember where I picked it up, but it
> was being distributed for free. I know another one is floating around
> somewhere, but that's the extent of my knowledge. I would have though there
> would be more information on this. Does anyone have insight into this trend?
>
> Attachment Size Malicious Interfaces.pdf [1] 580.23 KB
>

(((P
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