User Interface Design Trends

16 May 2011 - 11:15am
3 years ago
24 replies
6870 reads
Rob Tannen
2006

What do you see as the current or emerging trends in user interface design.  I don't mean the big changes like gestural interfaces, mobile devices, social networking, etc - I mean the more specific changes to the information architecture and graphical design of screens across devices/platforms?

Comments

17 May 2011 - 11:23am
smitty777
2010

Hi Rob, 

I'll take a stab at this.  This is a really interesting and relevant question, so I'm a little surprised at the lack of  response from the rest of the IXDAers. 

I think we are seeing the results of at least three different trends right now in the development of IA and design.  The first is that of the technology catching up with the web.  By this, I mean the state of the web technology has for the most part caught up with non-web or "application" technology to the point where they are almost indistinguishable.  From a UI perspective, this means that we can do anything on the web as anywhere else.  

The second is an exporting of these screens to mobility.  From an IA/Design perspective, this means adaping the "normal" screen to a much more confined space that may or may not use touchscreen technology.  This also means designing for a mobile workflow, where the UI is taken out of the office and into the wild in nightclubs, subways, and supermarkes where the timelines and interactions are more compressed.  This trend will of course continue while we shrink our computers and make them more pervasive and wearable. 

The third trend is that of the field of Design/IA maturing, at least for the standard interfaces we've been developing up to this point.  By this, I mean that you're not going to get too many heated discussions on placement of labels, font sizes, etc.  Don't get me wrong - I've seen some really really creative web designs out there recently, but we're talking about trends.  I think there are a lot of technologies just around the corner that have the potential to really shake things up, too (just look at any of the papers from CHI this year).  I do realize you said in your original post "[not] gestural interfaces, mobile devces...",  but really, I don't think you can ignore the impact that these technologies are having on the "standard design", whatever that means nowadays. 

Bill

27 May 2011 - 3:58pm
Lisa Goldberg
2007

Bill,

Do you think this statement is still true if you take accessibility into account? Just curious.

Thanks, Lisa

> By this, I mean the state of the web > technology has for the most part caught up with non-web or "application" > technology to the point where they are almost indistinguishable.  From a UI > perspective, this means that we can do anything on the web as anywhere else.

17 May 2011 - 12:28pm
Jack L. Moffett
2005

1. Across the board, user interfaces are becoming more contextual. This includes location awareness as well as awareness of identity, platform/technology, environmental conditions, and the like. User interfaces are utilizing whatever information they can to tailor the experience to not just a specific user, but the user's specific context at any given point in time.

2. Very much related to item 1, applications are becoming more connected. Based on contextual information, applications can connect to data sources, other applications, and other devices.

3. User interfaces are becoming more dynamic. From ajax calls that allow web applications to display new information without refreshing the page, to animated transitions that cue the user into changes on the screen, to the natural interactions afforded by touch and gesture-based input, our user interfaces are becoming quicker, subtler, smoother, flashier—whatever adjective you need to improve the user experience. They are more nuanced.

4. User interfaces are becoming richer. They are richer both visually and experientially. I suppose you could say that richness is really just a combined measurement of the previous three items, but I see it as more than the sum of those qualities.

5. At the same time, applications are becoming more focussed, dealing with a smaller set of tasks and doing them very well. A combination of context and focus is allowing user interfaces to become clearer (not necessarily simpler).

17 May 2011 - 10:02pm
Paul Bryan
2008

1. Personalization - A digital bespoke suit per user, with options to customize further

2. Gamification - Contextual identities, incentives for playful diversions, on-going rivalries

3. Socialization - Pulling significant others directly into the viewfinder focus

4. Portability (-ization) - Moving to another device doesn't break the experience

/pb

18 May 2011 - 1:56pm
Dave Malouf
2005

I like the push that MS is making in content as navigation in their mobile UIs and how they are pushing the "anti-chrome" agenda to all areas of their organization (slowly). If I see another punched up high-res icon I'm going to puke. They are also re-inventing some neat signafiers for navigation because of this, using the content to tell you about navigation context in interesting ways.

In UI Design, I think we are seeing discoverability be pushed. Its growingly acceptable w/ minimal negative feedback from users to have UIs that don't tell you straight up (or easily) what it is they do. Of course, primary or required to get started activities can't be discoverable, but other deeper areas. This allows for a different type of mode to exist w/o having the modes that J. Raskin had been warning us against. I'm not sure if it fashion or folly, short term or long term, but it is an interesting trend.

There is a simplification to visual communiation in UIs. My correlation (don't know if it is causation) is that as we bring dev and desgn closer together (see Web/tech coming together) through modes of working like agile and trans-des we have less time for visual richness, but also we want to communicate agility (not the programming kind, but business kind) and so thinner UIs (not in function or dynamism) are coming up. I hope this is fashion.

I have to disagree on the personalization side. I think we are finally (thank G-d!) moving away from individual personalization and people are growingly realizing that personalization is overrated. Apple is leading this agenda and I pray that Android finds the light as much as Windows has.

-- dave

27 May 2011 - 3:59pm
DrWex
2006

Dave

On Wed, May 18, 2011 at 3:26 PM, Dave Malouf wrote: > I like the push that MS is making in content as navigation in their mobile > UIs and how they are pushing the "anti-chrome" agenda to all areas of their > organization (slowly). If I see another punched up high-res icon I'm going > to puke. They are also re-inventing some neat signafiers for navigation > because of this, using the content to tell you about navigation context in > interesting ways.

I take your point, but could you give some examples (perhaps a screen shot or something?) that illustrates what you see as "content as navigation" or signifiers for navigation?

30 May 2011 - 1:51pm
GeoffWill
2010

jump up and down. Discoverability is being destroyed and with it the capability of users to find what controls they need to work with and use them effectively. In usability tests I have seen participants fail repeatedly to understand the UI and perform their tasks.

Design has gone so far overboard towards minimalist appearance that some UIs are not usable. A UI does not have to be the peak of design cool. It has to work for the user and their goals. From my point of view this is a trend that needs to have been cut short years ago. The UI should adequately inform the user about how to work with itself. When it doesn't, neither the UI nor the designer are doing their job.

You're not building some showcase for your talents. You are building a tool for somebody to do their job with. Now if you are building for entertainment, for games, maybe for education, have fun. In your company, track down whatever passes for the Voice of the Customer, direct verbatim feedback from customers. See what they have to say by the thousands. It may not be consistent with the latest design trends.

Geoff Willcher, Ph.D. User Experience Researcher

-----Original Message----- From: Dave Malouf Sent: Wednesday, May 18, 2011 12:07 PM To: gwbando@msn.com Subject: Re: [IxDA] User Interface Design Trends

I like the push that MS is making in content as navigation in their mobile UIs and how they are pushing the "anti-chrome" agenda to all areas of their organization (slowly). If I see another punched up high-res icon I'm going to puke. They are also re-inventing some neat signafiers for navigation because of this, using the content to tell you about navigation context in interesting ways.

In UI Design, I think we are seeing discoverability be pushed. Its growingly acceptable w/ minimal negative feedback from users to have UIs that don't tell you straight up (or easily) what it is they do. Of course, primary or required to get started activities can't be discoverable, but other deeper areas. This allows for a different type of mode to exist w/o having the modes that J. Raskin had been warning us against. I'm not sure if it fashion or folly, short term or long term, but it is an interesting trend.

There is a simplification to visual communiation in UIs. My correlation (don't know if it is causation) is that as we bring dev and desgn closer together (see Web/tech coming together) through modes of working like agile and trans-des we have less time for visual richness, but also we want to communicate agility (not the programming kind, but business kind) and so thinner UIs (not in function or dynamism) are coming up. I hope this is fashion.

I have to disagree on the personalization side. I think we are finally (thank G-d!) moving away from individual personalization and people are growingly realizing that personalization is overrated. Apple is leading this agenda and I pray that Android finds the light as much as Windows has.

30 May 2011 - 2:37pm
Dave Malouf
2005

 

Hi Geoff,

I have heard this complaint before using usability testing as a measure for success (or lack there of) due to the lack of visual communication letting people know what is possible in their devices. I can't refute the evidence as I've also experienced it.

Yet there are 2 other factors I'm seeing:

  1. People who buy these devices with "horrible" usability keep on re-buying them, and we've reached the point where this isn't just about early techie adopters.
  2. No one is asking these same people who failed when they first approach these devices to be tested again months later to see how they fair.

 

My maybe gut based contention here is that maybe "usability" which tends to favor the unindoctrinated in these studies, is not really the right measure of problem sourcing, or measuring user experience (or product design) success. How do we measure long term use in these projects over weeks and months to determine:

  1. uptake of features
  2. learnability over long time
  3. learned mental models over time

 

As I think someone mentioned we do not have years of "in the lab" here like we did with WIMP before the masses got their hands on this stuff. But that also means we have to have new methods of measurement than we are used to. We assume the base is good and we only need to tweak. But now the base and the tweaks need to be understood together, which is something we commonly don't measure for. I have also contended for a long time that most usability testing is "of the moment" and "in the lab" and do not offer really useful measurements for long term success and vear us away from disruptive and successful changes. It is by its nature favoring the status quo.

-- dave

1 Jun 2011 - 5:54am
GeoffWill
2010

Dave

thanks for your response.

I well understand that lab studies have a very short time base and usually measure initial experiences only.

I did an extensive customer research study at MSFT on the customer acceptance of the ribbon UI. This involved no lab studies at all. I looked at many sources of data direct from customers who had been working with the ribbon for months. The remarks I remember most strongly reflect length periods of non-adaptation where maintaining performance levels was crucial.

On the lack of discoverability issue, it is very compelling watching a large percentage of 32 people have the same problem with an interaction. When they cannot identify a navigation or control from a distance so that they can move to it, I'm compelled to believe that we are carrying minimalism too far. A group that I was a part of at Msft had a slogan "design rules." Strong sign to me that design has gone too far. Customer performance and customer satisfaction rule. Fail them and the company can fail.

Asserting that Dev's rule, or Design rules, or rules leads to suboptimization where one part of a system operates at a high level and the system as a whole suffers. To build a good product requires teamwork and collaboration, not superstars and individual super achievers. Unfortunately our corporate structures mostly look for the "best" and reinforce that person when more often a well functioning cross functional team is responsible for an achievement.

People have to have the software to do their jobs. the market is highly constrained. Your company is going to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on a CRM product. You learn it, curse a lot and get your job done. The questions for us is could a different design have improved productivity, shortened learning, made the curses less volatile. The individual user didn't purchase the enterprise product.

Usability / user experience is one of the right measures for the long term experience. It is just that set of studies won't be carried out in the lab. The primary band of production will stop, largely, once the product is released. Once the product is out the door, the user experience folks will be tasked with the next product, next version or bug fixes, etc. Very few companies bother to investigate the user experience of the product after installation. Although it would be great for marketing.

thank you for your remarks

-----Original Message----- From: Dave Malouf Sent: Monday, May 30, 2011 2:32 PM To: gwbando@msn.com Subject: Re: [IxDA] User Interface Design Trends

Hi Geoff,

I have heard this complaint before using usability testing as a measure for success (or lack there of) due to the lack of visual communication letting people know what is possible in their devices. I can't refute the evidence as I've also experienced it.

Yet there are 2 other factors I'm seeing:

1) People who buy these devices with "horrible" usability keep on re-buying them, and we've reached the point where this isn't just about early techie adopters. 2) No one is asking these same people who failed when they first approach these devices to be tested again months later to see how they fair.

My maybe gut based contention here is that maybe "usability" which tends to favor the unindoctrinated in these studies, is not really the right measure of problem sourcing, or measuring user experience (or product design) success. How do we measure long term use in these projects over weeks and months to determine:

1) uptake of features 2) learnability over long time 3) learned mental models over time

As I think someone mentioned we do not have years of "in the lab" here like we did with WIMP before the masses got their hands on this stuff. But that also means we have to have new methods of measurement than we are used to. We assume the base is good and we only need to tweak. But now the base and the tweaks need to be understood together, which is something we commonly don't measure for. I have also contended for a long time that most usability testing is "of the moment" and "in the lab" and do not offer really useful measurements for long term success and vear us away from disruptive and successful changes. It is by its nature favoring the status quo.

11 Jun 2011 - 10:06am
Dave Malouf
2005

I love something else. It's that something else that no usability report will ever look at. It is that moment, that special moment of discovery. Whatever manner that is, it doesn't matter. It could be by accident, by friend, by demo. It doesn't matter. 

E.g. I just showed my mom something about her iPhone that she didn't know before. She didn't fret about not knowing it, but upon my revellation on her behalf she grinned ear to ear. THAT is special. That feeling is now imprinted back onto th edevice. 

I recently gave a demo as part of a workshop on gesture design about some of the more hidden gestural interface moments in Twitter. The audience never knew these gestures were there. Of course these gestures weren't the only ways to achieve these activities, so there was no functionality lost, but upon discovering these gestures there was this amazing mix of both anger and amazement with it. Again, going from "damn you, Twitter!" to "awesome!" faster than a ferarri can get from 0-60 is a positive achievement.

Yes, if your focus is "just getting shit done" then I hear ya, but there is more to life and even to work when designing and I would contend that the different contexts, even mission critical ones still have to have these moments of delight. I love the image of the Yin Yang. It reminds us that even at the most extremes of a dichotomy there is still a dot of opposition to help maintain that balance.

I find in general though that most people who pick up a well-designed application even where elements of discoverability are in question end up with positive experiences. That being said, I have never seen anyone happy w/ the Ribbon from MS. It was a design that seems filled with "wouldn't it be great" and failed b/c it didn't offer anything to the critical mass of people who are their most loyal users. 

-- dave

11 Jun 2011 - 3:05pm
Louise Hewitt
2010

If I here myself say the word 'Modular' or 'Flexible content space' one more time I might scream.

Guess that makes it a trend. :D

Lou.

On Sat, Jun 11, 2011 at 4:54 PM, Dave Malouf <dave.ixd@gmail.com> wrote:

I love something else. It's that something else that no usability report will ever look at. It is that moment, that special moment of discovery. Whatever manner that is, it doesn't matter. It could be by accident, by friend, by demo. It doesn't matter. 

E.g. I just showed my mom something about her iPhone that she didn't know before. She didn't fret about not knowing it, but upon my revellation on her behalf she grinned ear to ear. THAT is special. That feeling is now imprinted back onto th edevice. 

I recently gave a demo as part of a workshop on gesture design about some of the more hidden gestural interface moments in Twitter. The audience never knew these gestures were there. Of course these gestures weren't the only ways to achieve these activities, so there was no functionality lost, but upon discovering these gestures there was this amazing mix of both anger and amazement with it. Again, going from "damn you, Twitter!" to "awesome!" faster than a ferarri can get from 0-60 is a positive achievement.

Yes, if your focus is "just getting shit done" then I hear ya, but there is more to life and even to work when designing and I would contend that the different contexts, even mission critical ones still have to have these moments of delight. I love the image of the Yin Yang. It reminds us that even at the most extremes of a dichotomy there is still a dot of opposition to help maintain that balance.

I find in general though that most people who pick up a well-designed application even where elements of discoverability are in question end up with positive experiences. That being said, I have never seen anyone happy w/ the Ribbon from MS. It was a design that seems filled with "wouldn't it be great" and failed b/c it didn't offer anything to the critical mass of people who are their most loyal users. 

18 Jun 2011 - 2:05pm
Richard Carson
2010

@ GeoffWill

A UI may not have to peak of design cool, but once you're done meeting goals of users, you're going to have to present these users with a visual design. Eventually, you might want something a designer would find worthy to showcase it amongst his/her talents. I can also see your point in meeting objectives of the user and how designers can tackle these issues differently than you would. However, with all the research you've made, how much knowledge do you even provide your visual designer if any at all?

In terms of trends, you are either a follower of them or one who creates them. If you are looking at design trends, then you'd want to design one. would you go and interview 1,000 users or designers to design a trend? To put it another way, the latest trends in modern dance are not created by the people who sit in the audience, but from the dancers themselves. By the time you interview people to get the answer, I'm betting that it's already out of style.

Richard Carson

On May 30, 2011, at 5:21 PM, GeoffWill wrote: > . > > Design has gone so far overboard towards minimalist appearance that some UIs > are not usable. A UI does not have to be the peak of design cool. It has to > work for the user and their goals. From my point of view this is a trend > that needs to have been cut short years ago. The UI should adequately inform > the user about how to work with itself. When it doesn't, neither the UI nor > the designer are doing their job. > > You're not building some showcase for your talents. You are building a tool > for somebody to do their job with. Now if you are building for > entertainment, for games, maybe for education, have fun. In your company, > track down whatever passes for the Voice of the Customer, direct verbatim > feedback from customers. See what they have to say by the thousands. It may > not be consistent with the latest design trends. > > Geoff Willcher, Ph.D. > User Experience Researcher

19 Jun 2011 - 12:06pm
GeoffWill
2010

Richard / All

I like beauty and elegance and surprisingly effective features. We had one neat discovery in MS CRM where a user had to make a decision and in the task flow, the application politely asked if they would like the app to remember their choice. They were delighted with this option.

As I have said a usability engineer (I am one) could easily suck the life out of an application with too exclusive a focus on utility. My description of the attributes of usability has 27 attributes, not the 3 or 5 that ACM has diminished the concept down to. The 100 page paper on this is MS confidential, but I hope to rewrite the content and make it public. This was written when I was with Trustworthy Computing.

re: how much do I provide to my designers? Egad! we normally work hand in glove. Design and UX are normally a closely functioning team. When I was with MS OBA the designer and I were like non-lookalike twins. We went everywhere together. No silos. We each had different, related and overlapping contributions. Also worked tightly with designers in my last assignment in the startup business group. Good collaboration. Very capable designers.

With respect, your discussion on trends doesn't seem to fit my remarks. There is interesting literature on trends. I would rather start one and attract 1000 people than be reactive to find out what 1000 folks thought was a trend.

What I practice is both creative and systematic innovation. Deliberate innovation is hard, but can be understood and validated. Inspiration is valuable, but needs to be validated. GUT feelings need reality checks.

regards,

geoff

-----Original Message----- From: Richard Carson Sent: Saturday, June 18, 2011 12:49 PM To: gwbando@msn.com Subject: Re: [IxDA] User Interface Design Trends

@ GeoffWill

A UI may not have to peak of design cool, but once you're done meeting goals of users, you're going to have to present these users with a visual design. Eventually, you might want something a designer would find worthy to showcase it amongst his/her talents. I can also see your point in meeting objectives of the user and how designers can tackle these issues differently than you would. However, with all the research you've made, how much knowledge do you even provide your visual designer if any at all?

In terms of trends, you are either a follower of them or one who creates them. If you are looking at design trends, then you'd want to design one. would you go and interview 1,000 users or designers to design a trend? To put it another way, the latest trends in modern dance are not created by the people who sit in the audience, but from the dancers themselves. By the time you interview people to get the answer, I'm betting that it's already out of style.

Richard Carson

On May 30, 2011, at 5:21 PM, GeoffWill wrote: > . > > Design has gone so far overboard towards minimalist appearance that some UIs > are not usable. A UI does not have to be the peak of design cool. It has > to > work for the user and their goals. From my point of view this is a trend > that needs to have been cut short years ago. The UI should adequately inform > the user about how to work with itself. When it doesn't, neither the UI > nor > the designer are doing their job. > > You're not building some showcase for your talents. You are building a > tool > for somebody to do their job with. Now if you are building for > entertainment, for games, maybe for education, have fun. In your company, > track down whatever passes for the Voice of the Customer, direct verbatim > feedback from customers. See what they have to say by the thousands. It > may > not be consistent with the latest design trends. > > Geoff Willcher, Ph.D. > User Experience Researcher

19 May 2011 - 3:54am
Rob Tannen
2006

Thanks guys - that's exactly the kind of input I was looking for.  I've also thought about a bottom-up influence of handheld/mobile design on the desktop.  That is, desktops and laptops are starting to utilize some of the basic conventions that were designed for the limited inputs of a handheld - for example, more minimal UIs and physical interactions even though you have a full keyboard and mouse.

19 May 2011 - 9:01am
smitty777
2010

Hi Rob, 

I just wanted to follow up with one thing from my first point, about the lack of constraints around UI design (especially web). I think that advances in web technologies have led us away from a strong central trend towards almost anything being capable. Take this site for example (a link from a Smashing Mag article - make sure you scroll down!): 

http://benthebodyguard.com/index.php

It's a really interesting design, and full of neat technology.  Creative? Yes.  Usable? Intuitive?  Not so much.  The point is that the technology has opened the door for the designer to do almost anything, which is exactly what's happening. 

I agree with Jack that the UIs are becoming more connected, richer and dynamic. But I'm not really seeing that much of an impact on the IA/Design, as you had asked about in your original post. Yes, they are becoming richer too.  But not always in a good way, as we can see from the link above.  From my perspective, the current advances in technology seem to be outstripping the ability of the UX folks ability to keep pace in many ways. 

 

27 May 2011 - 3:59pm
Dave Malouf
2005

Huh? Not intuitive or usable? When this 1st came out it was lauded by the design community for its design AND its usability. Exactly the example we should be thinking about when we think of non-WIMP interfaces to compelling content.

Give me more!

  • Dave
19 May 2011 - 9:15am
Josh B Williams
2010

I think one smaller point is people love instant gratification. Technology is now fast enough to give people that in ways it wasn’t before. So we are seeing a lot of experimentation on how dynamic and how instantaneous to make things. Seems almost a dated example now, but the Google instant search is a dramatic departure to how things are traditionally done.

19 May 2011 - 10:07am
Jack L. Moffett
2005

Smitty said:

"It's a really interesting design, and full of neat technology.  Creative? Yes.  Usable? Intuitive?  Not so much. [snip] Yes, they are becoming richer too.  But not always in a good way, as we can see from the link above."

I strongly disagree. That website is completely a marketing piece. It was designed as entertainment. It was designed to grab your attention; intrigue you; get you interested in the product they are working on. It is very well designed and beautifully executed. The goal was not to be "usable" or "intuitive" but to be discoverable and surprising, more like a game than an application. Don't think that "usability" is the end-all be-all of interaction.

I don't believe technology is ahead. I believe designers are chomping at the bit to be able to do more than what technology currently allows.

19 May 2011 - 10:19am
smitty777
2010

Hi Jack - I agree with you that the site is completely a marketing piece.  That's exactly why I chose it as an example of bad design and user experience.  Yeah, it looks cool, and it's immersive (I think).  But as "a website that is completely a marketing piece", it's a failure.  There are no clear affordances, very few links...shoot, I was on the site for 5 minutes, and I still don't know what he's selling.  Please don't get me wrong.  I've seen these types of sites done very well, and I'm not one of those "creativity is bad" guys.  But I don't think this is one of those examples. 

19 May 2011 - 10:55am
Jack L. Moffett
2005

The bouncy "SCROLL" seems like enough affordance to me. And as for what is being sold, it seems perfectly clear to me: nothing yet, but presumably an iApp that will help protect your files. It is a teaser intended to get interest. In that, I argue that it is extremely effective, although you would need to find out what their subscription rate is to prove that. I'm willing to bet you did scroll all the way to the bottom. In fact, I'd argue that the fact that it held your attention for five minutes is a testament to its success.

27 May 2011 - 3:58pm
a2slbailey
2010

When it comes to the web, two trends that seem to be cropping up more and more are "mega menus" where the global nav can be expanded/exploded out on the homepage (or whatever page the user is on) to show multiple levels of the hierarchy for one-click access. I'm very curious about the usability of these kinds of menus and haven't had an opportunity to test one yet. 
The other thing I'm seeing a lot of, which is somewhat parallel, is extended footers that can be hundreds of pixels in height and repeat a lot of the navigation in the footer. Ditto when it comes to usability, although since it's in the footer I wouldn't expect there to be as much potential for problems.
sb

27 May 2011 - 3:58pm
Richard Carson
2010

I see a trend in transparent interfaces being used more and more.

Sent from my iPhone

On May 16, 2011, at 12:34 PM, Rob Tannen wrote:

> What do you see as the current or emerging trends in user interface design. I don't mean the big changes like gestural interfaces, mobile devices, social networking, etc - I mean the more specific changes to the information architecture and graphical design of screens across devices/platforms? > >

28 May 2011 - 11:20am
sdowney
2008

a2sbailey -

Nielsen reports his study of mega menus in 2009 -  http://www.useit.com/alertbox/mega-menus-wrong.html and updates it in 2010 - http://www.useit.com/alertbox/mega-dropdown-menus.html.   

(Am I a nOOb for quoting Nielen with this group? ;)

30 May 2011 - 1:51pm
mcaskey
2008

Love the HULU example of a mega-menu done wrong. I have always been frustrated with that one, because it looks nice, but is not great when you actually try to use it.

Also liked the usa.gov example because the mention of the use of columns served as a reminder that I need to re-examine the use of columns on my most recent imlementation of a mega-menu, on this sports supplements site: http://ast-ss.com/ (hover over the PRODUCTS menu to see that one). Also, would love any tips from the group on other ways to improve this instance of a mega menu.

Thanks!

  • Mike Caskey

On May 28, 2011, at 10:23 AM, sdowney wrote:

> a2sbailey - > > Nielsen reports his study of mega menus in 2009 - http://www.useit.com/alertbox/mega-menus-wrong.html and updates it in 2010 - http://www.useit.com/alertbox/mega-dropdown-menus.html.
> > (Am I a nOOb for quoting Nielen with this group? ;) > >

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