UX feedback for client question

29 Nov 2011 - 12:15pm
2 years ago
6 replies
1039 reads
iokasti
2009

Hi everyone,

I have been asked to give UX feedback on a website, and prepared a lot of handwritten notes on it. I now want to give this feedback to the client and I was wondering what format to present this feedback in a "professional" way. This is my first UX gig so your reply is greatly appreciated.

Thank you,

Sofia

Comments

29 Nov 2011 - 2:41pm
akshay_IxD
2010

Hi Sofia,

I use Visio and screen capture tool (mainly SnagIt) to do this kind of work. You can take a screen grab and paste in Visio and use the Visio tools (callouts, notes, arrows etc) to add your comments specific to each screen. Visio lets you add multiple pages within one file, that way you can have all your feedback in one file and track the progress easily.

I hope this helps.

Regards,

Akshay

 

 

30 Nov 2011 - 2:05am
eliannaj
2010

Sofia -

Depending on the relationship with the client you should present it in the most professional manner. Pretend they are actually going to read it and take heed.

I try to provide an "Executive Summary" at the top -- just a paragraph or two that sums up your findings. If that is catchy enough they will read on. Break down your findings into natural catagories and assemble them in a priority order.

Always include compliments on whatever they've done right. I list suggestions of what they can do next in the order of most impact/ least cost or technical effort first and so on, down the line. You can consider it "biggest bang for the buck".

Congratulations on your first of many gigs!
elianna james

30 Nov 2011 - 6:05pm
iokasti
2009

Thank you for the feedback guys, it is all very useful. I don't have visio, so my choices are probably Powerpoint as Sachendra suggests or Illustrator. Would it be an overkill to use Illustrator for this?

Thanks,

Sofia

On Nov 30, 2011, at 2:30 AM, eliannaj wrote:

> Sofia - > > Depending on the relationship with the client you should present it in the most professional manner. Pretend they are actually going to read it and take heed. > > I try to provide an "Executive Summary" at the top -- just a paragraph or two that sums up your findings. If that is catchy enough they will read on. Break down your findings into natural catagories and assemble them in a priority order. > > Always include compliments on whatever they've done right. I list suggestions of what they can do next in the order of most impact/ least cost or technical effort first and so on, down the line. You can consider it "biggest bang for the buck". > > Congratulations on your first of many gigs! > elianna james > >

30 Nov 2011 - 8:05pm
willdonovan
2009

I like using power point or keynote as well.

I'd annotate it in Omnigraffle with the Kinogi stencils which have a great set of annotation icons you can number.



William Donovan
t, fb, in, b: @willdonovan
http://www.willdonovan.com.au/

Projects:
KiN : http://flavors.me/kin
State of Design Festival: See the projects Victoria-India Service Design Jam



On 1 December 2011 10:14, iokasti <sofia@copperbluemedia.com> wrote:

Thank you for the feedback guys, it is all very useful. I don't have visio, so my choices are probably Powerpoint as Sachendra suggests or Illustrator. Would it be an overkill to use Illustrator for this?

Thanks,

Sofia

On Nov 30, 2011, at 2:30 AM, eliannaj wrote:

> Sofia -
>
> Depending on the relationship with the client you should present it in the most professional manner. Pretend they are actually going to read it and take heed.
>
> I try to provide an "Executive Summary" at the top -- just a paragraph or two that sums up your findings. If that is catchy enough they will read on. Break down your findings into natural catagories and assemble them in a priority order.
>
> Always include compliments on whatever they've done right. I list suggestions of what they can do next in the order of most impact/ least cost or technical effort first and so on, down the line. You can consider it "biggest bang for the buck".
>
> Congratulations on your first of many gigs!
> elianna james
>
>

30 Nov 2011 - 8:05pm
willdonovan
2009

oops, that was meant to say Konigi stencils.


William Donovan
t, fb, in, b: @willdonovan
http://www.willdonovan.com.au/

Projects:
KiN : http://flavors.me/kin
State of Design Festival: See the projects Victoria-India Service Design Jam



On 1 December 2011 11:35, William Donovan <donovan.william@gmail.com> wrote:

I like using power point or keynote as well.

I'd annotate it in Omnigraffle with the Kinogi stencils which have a great set of annotation icons you can number.



William Donovan
t, fb, in, b: @willdonovan
http://www.willdonovan.com.au/

Projects:
KiN : http://flavors.me/kin
State of Design Festival: See the projects Victoria-India Service Design Jam



On 1 December 2011 10:14, iokasti <sofia@copperbluemedia.com> wrote:
Thank you for the feedback guys, it is all very useful. I don't have visio, so my choices are probably Powerpoint as Sachendra suggests or Illustrator. Would it be an overkill to use Illustrator for this?

Thanks,

Sofia

On Nov 30, 2011, at 2:30 AM, eliannaj wrote:

> Sofia -
>
> Depending on the relationship with the client you should present it in the most professional manner. Pretend they are actually going to read it and take heed.
>
> I try to provide an "Executive Summary" at the top -- just a paragraph or two that sums up your findings. If that is catchy enough they will read on. Break down your findings into natural catagories and assemble them in a priority order.
>
> Always include compliments on whatever they've done right. I list suggestions of what they can do next in the order of most impact/ least cost or technical effort first and so on, down the line. You can consider it "biggest bang for the buck".
>
> Congratulations on your first of many gigs!
> elianna james
>
>

30 Nov 2011 - 2:05am
Sachendra
2005

PowerPoint works very well for me

-- Sachendra Yadav http://sachendra.wordpress.com

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