What tools do you use for backing up files to cloud, time entry, and project management?

26 Feb 2012 - 11:40pm
2 years ago
13 replies
2089 reads
tamella
2008

Hello, I'm curious what tools others are using for backing up files now that idisk will be going away.  Any new project or time entry applications out?

What tools do you use for backing up files to cloud, time entry, and project management?

Thanks,

Tammy

Comments

27 Feb 2012 - 12:08am
rohitrmehta
2011

I use http://www.box.com to backup files.

Google Docs is a nice way to manage and track the project. What do you use?

27 Feb 2012 - 4:05am
philipbrook
2008

Basecamp for project management and file distribution. Drop box for cloud storage.

28 Feb 2012 - 2:50pm
Brian Peppler
2008

I second the nomination for DropboxCrashplan is great for backing up files too. I love Harvest for time entry.

29 Feb 2012 - 4:13am
Bernard Tyers
2011

Hi,

I use Dropbox for file management and moving files amongst machines. I do use it for backup of some files, but I also have a local backup (as you can never trust cloud 100%).

I also use Evernote for files like pdfs, docs, as they can be referenced in notes stored in the cloud with Evernote. This is very useful.

I hope that helps,

Bernard

29 Feb 2012 - 2:07pm
a2slbailey
2010

Backup to cloud: Carbonite (pure backup of all) and Sugar Synch (synching across computers of critical data)

Time tracking: Paymo.biz--very, very pleased with this service and use it for invoicing as well.

Project Management: Ugh; still waiting for the killer app.

 

sb

29 Feb 2012 - 4:06pm
hassan.schroede...
2009

 

> Backup to cloud: Carbonite (pure backup of all)

If you're on a Mac, DO NOT depend on Carbonite.

I just found out the hard way that it doesn't support versioning of files, so if your last backup included a file that was already e.g. corrupted or truncated -- that's all you can retrieve. You can't go back to find a last good version.

Recommendations for  a replacement are welcome  :-)

FWIW,

 

29 Feb 2012 - 5:37pm
Bernard Tyers
2011

I know Dropbox supports versioning on files.

But to be honest, if you are going to rely on cloud backup services ALONE, you are opening yourself up to a world of unnecessary pain.

Adopt a proper backup strategy.

29 Feb 2012 - 7:09pm
Alan Hogan
2007

I just used Backblaze (like Carbonite or Mozy) last night to restore files that I had been working on shortly before my computer died.

(It *does* allow the restore of old versions of files/folders, by the way.)

The files in question had not been backed up to Time Machine because I have a nasty habit of only connecting that drive every ~10 days, and it had been a week.

 

But to be honest, if you are going to rely on cloud backup services ALONE, you are opening yourself up to a world of unnecessary pain.

True.

For me, that means Time Machine (local) + Backblaze (remote) + some Dropbox, mostly for sync & convenience + GitHub for shared code as a final layer of redundancy (I do a lot of programming).

29 Feb 2012 - 8:11pm
hassan.schroede...
2009

 

> I just used Backblaze (like Carbonite or Mozy) 

> (It *does* allow the restore of old versions of files/folders, by the way.)

Good to know, thank you. (Mozy is also b0rk3d as far as I'm concerned -- restoral doesn't retain file modification time, or at least it didn't used to.)

> The files in question had not been backed up to Time Machine because I have a nasty habit of only connecting that drive every ~10 days, and it had been a week.

And that's exactly why cloud-based backup is desirable -- Time Machine/local backup only helps if you're in a fixed location (or carry around a drive, problematic on multiple levels). 

But my original point re' Carbonite is that backup is useless unless you can restore valid data from it :-)

 

Thanks for the BackBlaze tip.

 

1 Mar 2012 - 5:02am
Bernard Tyers
2011

Hi,

I'm glad you focused on that part of my reply Alan. I was trying to be helpful in general and not make the thread into a back-up strategy thread. Dropbox should not be a file backup strategy.

To address the points sent to me off-list (for some reason) by a list member:

>> "I know Dropbox supports versioning on files."

> but which is not a backup application per se'.

No Dropbox is not a backup application. It is a file sharing service, which allows you to store files "in the cloud". Unfortunately though, people do see this as a backup service, and it causes them alot of pain.

>> "Adopt a proper backup strategy."

> Thanks for the vague, arrogant directive. If you can't offer a useful response to the question, why bother?

It was not a directive, more so a suggestion. Because I did not want to make the thread overly technical speaking solely about backup strategies.

I think Alan has given a very good backup strategy for people to look at. But again, backup for each person can be different.

Mine would be different to his, but I know mine serves me. I use the Unix application rsync (free) to copy the contents of my machine to my small Network Attached Storage (NAS) device (Thecus N4100+ ~ $400-500) every hour. This NAS is setup so I will not loose data from if one disk crashes. It does require some technical knowledge, but it is not very difficult.

I have seen people using Time Machine but would be worried about it storing dynamic data, like DB files, and Outlook Mailboxes. If you backup just files, then Time Machine is good.

I just rememebered I also use this application Timesheet (http://bit.ly/timesheetandroid) on Android for recording my time on projects. While its not web based, I do store the time sheets files in my Dropbox and it allows me to send by e-mail, etc.

Hope that helps.

Bernard

1 Mar 2012 - 5:15am
Bernard Tyers
2011

Backblaze certainly does look interesting, here is a comparison to another service called "Crashplan":

http://gigaom.com/apple/backblaze-vs-crashplan-mac-backup-smackdown-round-2/

 

1 Mar 2012 - 10:00pm
tamella
2008

Thanks for all the great feedback.  I also am a fan of dropbox. 

Tammy

 

3 Mar 2012 - 2:22pm
Jochen Wolters
2010

Tammy,

for backups, have a look at CrashPlan. It is my favorite online backup solution for three reasons:

1. Indefinite storage timeframe: When you delete a file on your computer, most cloud backup services also deleted them from your cloud backup after a while. CrashPlan will keep all files indefinitely.

2. Multiple backup destinations: Besides supporting online backups, CrashPlan allows you to back up to local hard drives and even other computers outside of your local network, like a friend's machine. (Backups are encrypted, so there's no need to worry about privacy).

3. They offer "unlimited" plans: CrashPlan offers a subscription plan for up to ten machines and unlimited storage, so you don't have to worry about running out of online storage allowance.

The software runs on Windows, OS X, and Linux, which may be reason for its only (mild) drawback: Its UI does not feel native on any platform, and some of its options may be overwhelming to newbie users. Nevertheless, it's sufficiently accessible to get started without digging too deeply into its more advanced options.

In addition to using CrashPlan with a local hard drive for a versioned backup, I also have a clone backup created with SuperDuper! (Mac-only). The advantage of a clone is that if your computer's hard drive does break down, you can simply boot from the clone and continue working. Instead of having to wait for an hours-long file restore to finish, you lose only a few minutes and can defer the actual restore to a later time (when your clients are not breathing down your neck ;) ).

For synchronizing "in progress" files between several computers, I use Wuala. It's not as smoothly integrated into the computer's native UI as its key competitor, Dropbox, but it has some advanced features that are not available on Dropbox.

Wuala does have one major advantage over Dropbox, and that is encryption: Any data that is uploaded to Wuala is encrypted before it leaves your machine(s), so no-one can access it, not even the good folks working at Wuala. Dropbox also encrypts the transfer of the data, but not its storage on the Dropbox servers.

For time tracking and task planning in my one-guy-shop, I'm a very satisfied user of Billings and OmniFocus, respectively. 

Greetings,

Jochen

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